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Chapter 18
 

Chapter 18

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  • Review chapter objectives.
  • Review clause, independent clause, and dependent clause.
  • Discuss Option 4 & 5 for combining simple sentences.
  • Discuss using subordinate conjunctions.Review INFO BOX: Subordinating Conjunctions.
  • Discuss punctuating complex sentences.

Chapter 18 Chapter 18 Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CHAPTER 18: BEYOND THE SIMPLE SENTENCE: SUBORDINATIONCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CHAPTER OUTLINE AND LEARNING OBJECTIVESIn this chapter, you will be learn to: identify sentence-combining techniques that rely on subordinating conjunctions, distinguish between dependent and independent clauses, and generate and punctuate sentences. Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • MORE ON COMBINING SIMPLE SENTENCES Review  A clause has a subject and a verb.  An independent clause is a simple sentence; it is a group of words, with a subject and verb, that makes sense by itself.  Another kind of clause, a dependent clause, has a subject and a verb, but it does not make sense by itself. It depends on the rest of the sentence to give it meaning.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • MORE ON COMBINING SIMPLE SENTENCES Review Chapter 16 for Options 1–3 Option 4: Using a Dependent Clause to Begin a Sentence  Combine simple sentences by changing an independent clause from one sentence into a dependent clause and placing it at the beginning of the new sentence. Option 5: Using a Dependent Clause to End a Sentence  Combine simple sentences by changing an independent clause from one sentence into a dependent clause and placing it at the end of the new sentence.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • MORE ON COMBINING SIMPLE SENTENCES  Using Subordinate Conjunctions Changing an independent clause to a dependent one is called subordinating. To subordinate, you add a subordinating word, called a subordinating conjunction, to an independent clause, making it dependent, or subordinate, in the new sentence. INFO BOX: Subordinating ConjunctionsCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • MORE ON COMBINING SIMPLE SENTENCES  Punctuating Complex Sentences A complex sentence is a sentence that has one independent clause and one (or more) dependent clause(s). If the dependent clause comes at the beginning of the sentence, put a comma after the dependent clause. If the dependent clause comes at the end of the sentence, do not put a comma in front of the dependent clause. INFO BOX: Options for Combining SentencesCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHAT IS A DEPENDENT CLAUSE?A. The basic building block of an essay.B. The basic building block of the paragraph.C. A clause that has a subject and verb, but it does not make sense by itself.D. A clause that has a subject and verb and makes sense by itself.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHAT IS A DEPENDENT CLAUSE?A. The basic building block of an essay.B. The basic building block of the paragraph.C. A clause that has a subject and verb, but it does not make sense by itself.D. A clause that has a subject and verb and makes sense by itself.distinguish between dependent and independentclausesCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • OF THE FOLLOWING, WHICH IS THE CORRECT WAY TO COMBINETHE TWO SENTENCES BELOW?I was late for school.My car had a flat tire.A. Because my car had a flat tire: I was late for work.B. Because my car had a flat tire; I was late for work.C. Because my car had a flat tire, I was late for work.D. Because my car had a flat tire I was late for work.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • OF THE FOLLOWING, WHICH IS THE CORRECT WAY TO COMBINETHE TWO SENTENCES BELOW?I was late for school.My car had a flat tire.A. Because my car had a flat tire: I was late for work.B. Because my car had a flat tire; I was late for work.C. Because my car had a flat tire, I was late for work.D. Because my car had a flat tire I was late for work.identify sentence-combining techniques that rely onsubordinating conjunctions,Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.