Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Beyond the simple sentence

3,546 views

Published on

Aligned with Chapters 17 & 18 of Along Those Lines 5th edition

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Beyond the simple sentence

  1. 1. Beyond the Simple Sentence<br />ED 095<br />Mrs. Jefferson<br />
  2. 2. The Clause<br />A group of words containing a subject and a verb is called a clause.<br />Makes sense by itself = independent clause<br />One independent clause = simple sentence<br />
  3. 3. Combining Simple Sentences<br />Sentence variety is necessary for good writing<br />Mixing a simple with a complex one or in other words mixing a short sentence with a long one.<br />Three Options…<br />
  4. 4. Option 1: Using a Comma With a Coordinating Conjunction<br />Combine two simple sentences with a comma and a coordinating conjunction.<br />Coordinating conjunction examples: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so<br />
  5. 5. Option 1: Using a Comma With a Coordinating Conjunction<br />Jennifer likes Italian food. Mark prefers Korean dishes.<br />Jennifer likes Italian food, and Mark prefers Korean dishes.<br />Jennifer likes Italian food, but Mark prefers Korean dishes.<br />
  6. 6. Where Does the Comma Go?<br />Comma comes before the coordinating conjunction.<br />It comes before the new idea, the second independent clause.<br />
  7. 7. Where Does the Comma Go?<br />She joined the army, and she traveled overseas.<br />She joined the army any. She traveled overseas.<br />She joined the army. And she traveled overseas.<br />Let’s Practice: <br />Exercise 1 – 1 & 3<br />Exercise 2 –8& 10<br />
  8. 8. Answers<br />Cruiser Auto Parts offers a wide range of accessories for Toyota Tundras, so Edward spends half his paycheck on gadgets for his truck.<br />My mother won’t tell me about her trip to the emergency room, nor will she explain her decision to take a class in self defense.<br />
  9. 9. Answers<br />Ramon Ramirez played football in high school, and Hector Ramirez went to college on a baseball scholarship.<br />I caught a bad cold at the hockey game last weekend, so I couldn’t go to work yesterday.<br />I might send my child to the day-care center, or I might drop him off at my mother’s house.<br />
  10. 10. Option 2: Using a Semicolon Between Two Simple Sentences<br />Don’t want to use a coordinating conjunction? Use the semi colon.<br />Ex. I cooked the turkey. She made the stuffing.<br />I cooked the turkey; she made the stuffing.<br />
  11. 11. Option 3: Using a Semicolon and a Conjunctive Adverb<br />You can join two simple sentences with a conjunctive adverb.<br />See Info Box on page 395.<br />Ex: My parents check my homework every night. I did well in math.<br />My parents checked my homework every night; thus I did well in math.<br />
  12. 12. Punctuating after a Conjunctive Adverb<br />Put a comma after the conjunctive adverb if the conjunctive adverb is more than one syllable long.<br />Furthermore, consequently, moreover, etc. = comma<br />Thus, also, next, etc. = semicolon<br />Let’s Practice: <br />Exercise 3 – 3 &5<br />Exercise 4 – 2 & 5<br />
  13. 13. Answers<br />My first year in college is almost over; soon I’ll be a sophomore with a fairly respectable academic record.<br />Shane never paid me back for the loan of twenty dollars; instead, he took me to the movies yesterday.<br />
  14. 14. Answers<br />The band on the stage started throwing trinket to the audience; as a result, a huge crowd pushed toward the first row of seats.<br />The first snow of the year began to fall; soon the white coating transformed the hills and trees into a strange scene.<br />
  15. 15. Independent Practice<br />On a sheet of loose leaf paper<br />Exercise #5 (all)<br />Exercise #8 (7 additions/1 deletion)<br />Early Finishers:<br />Begin reading “Spanglish” – pg. 603<br />Answer Comprehension Check – pg. 605<br />
  16. 16. Avoiding Run-On Sentences and Comma Splices<br />
  17. 17. Run-on Sentences<br />Independent clauses that has not been joined correctly.<br />Also caused a fused sentence.<br />Ex. Carol cleans her kitchen every week shines shines every pot and pan.<br />Corrected: Carol cleans her kitchen every week; she shines every pot and pan.<br />
  18. 18. Correcting the Run-On Sentence<br />Step 1: Check for two independent clauses<br />Step 2: Check that the clauses are separated by either a coordinating conjunction and a comma or by a semicolon.<br />Let’s Practice: Exercise 1 – 2, 4, 7, 8<br />
  19. 19. Answers<br />OK<br />The puppy eats anything on the floor,and it pulls the toilet paper off the bathroom roller.<br />The apples in our high school cafeteria tasted mushy, so I avoided eating apples for year.<br />OK<br />
  20. 20. Comma Splices<br />An error that occurs when you punctuate with a comma but should use a semicolon instead.<br />If you are combining two independent clauses without a coordinating conjunction, you must use a semicolon.<br />Ex: The crowd pushed forward, people began to panic.<br />Correct: The crowd pushed forward; people began to panic.<br />
  21. 21. Correcting Comma Splices<br />Step 1: Check for two independent clauses.<br />Step 2: Check that the clauses are separated by a coordinating conjunction. CC? = comma ok. No CC? = needs a semicolon<br />Let’s Practice: Exercise 2 – 2, 3, 6, 7<br />
  22. 22. Answers<br />The leather jacket is soft and stylish; however, it is extremely expensive.<br />OK<br />The actor has a reputation for throwing temper tantrums on movie sets; nevertheless, he is good at his craft.<br />OK<br />
  23. 23. Independent Practice<br />Exercise 5 (9 errors)<br />Early Finishers:<br />Begin reading “Spanglish” – pg. 603<br />Answer Comprehension Check – pg. 605<br />

×