Beyond the simple sentence

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Aligned with Chapters 17 & 18 of Along Those Lines 5th edition

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Beyond the simple sentence

  1. 1. Beyond the Simple Sentence<br />ED 095<br />Mrs. Jefferson<br />
  2. 2. The Clause<br />A group of words containing a subject and a verb is called a clause.<br />Makes sense by itself = independent clause<br />One independent clause = simple sentence<br />
  3. 3. Combining Simple Sentences<br />Sentence variety is necessary for good writing<br />Mixing a simple with a complex one or in other words mixing a short sentence with a long one.<br />Three Options…<br />
  4. 4. Option 1: Using a Comma With a Coordinating Conjunction<br />Combine two simple sentences with a comma and a coordinating conjunction.<br />Coordinating conjunction examples: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so<br />
  5. 5. Option 1: Using a Comma With a Coordinating Conjunction<br />Jennifer likes Italian food. Mark prefers Korean dishes.<br />Jennifer likes Italian food, and Mark prefers Korean dishes.<br />Jennifer likes Italian food, but Mark prefers Korean dishes.<br />
  6. 6. Where Does the Comma Go?<br />Comma comes before the coordinating conjunction.<br />It comes before the new idea, the second independent clause.<br />
  7. 7. Where Does the Comma Go?<br />She joined the army, and she traveled overseas.<br />She joined the army any. She traveled overseas.<br />She joined the army. And she traveled overseas.<br />Let’s Practice: <br />Exercise 1 – 1 & 3<br />Exercise 2 –8& 10<br />
  8. 8. Answers<br />Cruiser Auto Parts offers a wide range of accessories for Toyota Tundras, so Edward spends half his paycheck on gadgets for his truck.<br />My mother won’t tell me about her trip to the emergency room, nor will she explain her decision to take a class in self defense.<br />
  9. 9. Answers<br />Ramon Ramirez played football in high school, and Hector Ramirez went to college on a baseball scholarship.<br />I caught a bad cold at the hockey game last weekend, so I couldn’t go to work yesterday.<br />I might send my child to the day-care center, or I might drop him off at my mother’s house.<br />
  10. 10. Option 2: Using a Semicolon Between Two Simple Sentences<br />Don’t want to use a coordinating conjunction? Use the semi colon.<br />Ex. I cooked the turkey. She made the stuffing.<br />I cooked the turkey; she made the stuffing.<br />
  11. 11. Option 3: Using a Semicolon and a Conjunctive Adverb<br />You can join two simple sentences with a conjunctive adverb.<br />See Info Box on page 395.<br />Ex: My parents check my homework every night. I did well in math.<br />My parents checked my homework every night; thus I did well in math.<br />
  12. 12. Punctuating after a Conjunctive Adverb<br />Put a comma after the conjunctive adverb if the conjunctive adverb is more than one syllable long.<br />Furthermore, consequently, moreover, etc. = comma<br />Thus, also, next, etc. = semicolon<br />Let’s Practice: <br />Exercise 3 – 3 &5<br />Exercise 4 – 2 & 5<br />
  13. 13. Answers<br />My first year in college is almost over; soon I’ll be a sophomore with a fairly respectable academic record.<br />Shane never paid me back for the loan of twenty dollars; instead, he took me to the movies yesterday.<br />
  14. 14. Answers<br />The band on the stage started throwing trinket to the audience; as a result, a huge crowd pushed toward the first row of seats.<br />The first snow of the year began to fall; soon the white coating transformed the hills and trees into a strange scene.<br />
  15. 15. Independent Practice<br />On a sheet of loose leaf paper<br />Exercise #5 (all)<br />Exercise #8 (7 additions/1 deletion)<br />Early Finishers:<br />Begin reading “Spanglish” – pg. 603<br />Answer Comprehension Check – pg. 605<br />
  16. 16. Avoiding Run-On Sentences and Comma Splices<br />
  17. 17. Run-on Sentences<br />Independent clauses that has not been joined correctly.<br />Also caused a fused sentence.<br />Ex. Carol cleans her kitchen every week shines shines every pot and pan.<br />Corrected: Carol cleans her kitchen every week; she shines every pot and pan.<br />
  18. 18. Correcting the Run-On Sentence<br />Step 1: Check for two independent clauses<br />Step 2: Check that the clauses are separated by either a coordinating conjunction and a comma or by a semicolon.<br />Let’s Practice: Exercise 1 – 2, 4, 7, 8<br />
  19. 19. Answers<br />OK<br />The puppy eats anything on the floor,and it pulls the toilet paper off the bathroom roller.<br />The apples in our high school cafeteria tasted mushy, so I avoided eating apples for year.<br />OK<br />
  20. 20. Comma Splices<br />An error that occurs when you punctuate with a comma but should use a semicolon instead.<br />If you are combining two independent clauses without a coordinating conjunction, you must use a semicolon.<br />Ex: The crowd pushed forward, people began to panic.<br />Correct: The crowd pushed forward; people began to panic.<br />
  21. 21. Correcting Comma Splices<br />Step 1: Check for two independent clauses.<br />Step 2: Check that the clauses are separated by a coordinating conjunction. CC? = comma ok. No CC? = needs a semicolon<br />Let’s Practice: Exercise 2 – 2, 3, 6, 7<br />
  22. 22. Answers<br />The leather jacket is soft and stylish; however, it is extremely expensive.<br />OK<br />The actor has a reputation for throwing temper tantrums on movie sets; nevertheless, he is good at his craft.<br />OK<br />
  23. 23. Independent Practice<br />Exercise 5 (9 errors)<br />Early Finishers:<br />Begin reading “Spanglish” – pg. 603<br />Answer Comprehension Check – pg. 605<br />

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