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Teaching for Artistic Behavior (TAB)
 

Teaching for Artistic Behavior (TAB)

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An overview of TAB philosophy and practice from an elementary studio classroom.

An overview of TAB philosophy and practice from an elementary studio classroom.

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  • Wonderful 'slide show'! I really love seeing all of the different centers and the materials and visuals that are included in each. Two questions: I have read that it is the students responsibility to care for the materials in all of the centers; how do you ensure that they are effectively fulfilling this responsibility? And - In my experience, many (most) students have a tendency to rush and not develop a piece to its fullest potential; do you encourage students to slow down and really try to make a piece as good as they possibly can before moving on, and if so, how? Mary Alice Flynn
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  • Katherine - Great overview! Love the visuals hanging around the classroom!
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    Teaching for Artistic Behavior (TAB) Teaching for Artistic Behavior (TAB) Presentation Transcript

    • Teaching for Artistic Behavior Choice-Based Art Education Katherine Douglas
    • Artistic Choice:
      • “ The job of the artist is to have an idea and find the best material to express it, or to find a material that leads to an idea.”
      • Pauline Joseph
    • In a TAB classroom students can
      • Work at their own speed
      • Work from strengths
      • Follow a line of thought over time
      • Learn from and work with peers
      • Be “on task” for a great portion of the class—there is no waiting for materials to be passed out, for instance, and when finished, students can move on to another piece without assistance.
      • Develop a working style
      • Use what they know to show what they know: student interests can be explored in visual form.
      • Form cooperative groups and engage in positive social interactions
      • Take responsibility for care of materials and centers.
    • In a TAB classroom teachers can
      • Observe students working independently to determine strengths and weaknesses
      • Work with small groups of interested students while others work independently, allowing for more in-depth instruction.
      • Offer special “scaffolding” to struggling students
      • Get to know students well through their very individual personal styles
      • Expect students to come to class highly motivated and ready to work
    • Teachers in a choice-based classroom provide:
      • TIME
      • SPACE
      • MATERIALS
      • INSTRUCTION
      • SPIRIT
      • Classrooms are arranged as studios, with organized centers for available art media.
    • Learning and Teaching
      • Each class starts with a five minute demonstration for the whole group.
    • Students may try the new focus or work independently in centers.
    • Materials and techniques in centers have been introduced whole-group.
    • Students learn from the teacher.
    • Students learn from center directions.
    • Students learn from each other.
    • Students learn from resources in the centers.
    • Student teach themselves.
    • When students work independently…
      • the teacher is able to observe what students know and
      • can do.
    • Paint Center
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    • Printmaking Center
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    • Maskmaking Center
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    • Weaving Center
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    • Sculpture Center
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    • The Shipyard Project
      • Student had an interest in The Titanic outside of school.
      • Over the summer he researched, drew blueprints and recruited his best friend to help.
      • He approached the teacher with his plan in September.
      • He and his friends worked on it for 7 months.
      • Other students in class were influenced to work on smaller versions.
      • The teacher served as a materials resource and offered technical advice, as well as negotiating extra work time for them.
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    • Collage Center
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    • Puppet Center
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    • Drawing Center
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    • Chalkboard
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    • Architecture
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    • Art History Connections
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      • We face a critical need for innovative thinkers in the 21st century. The arts are one of the few places left in the curriculum where students can take creative ownership of their learning.
      • Valuing students' ideas and arranging the classroom for child-centered authentic learning promotes deep inquiry and reflection for all learners in our diverse school communities.
      • Diane Jaquith, 2008
    • For More Information Visit: http://teachingforartisticbehavior.org