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Atlas Shoved!

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This is my report and it will give a basic overview to better understand where we stand and what are the motivations driving the actions of publishers …

This is my report and it will give a basic overview to better understand where we stand and what are the motivations driving the actions of publishers

I started with gaps in my understanding of how all the pieces fit together, what I will do here is lay it all out in a narrative that you can use it to craft a response that works for you..

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  • DLDS was kind enough to sponsor a trip to attend the Tools of Change for Publishing Conference in NYC in February.This is my report and it will give a basic overview to better understand where stand and what are the motivations driving the actions of publishers I started with gaps in my understanding of how all the pieces fit together, what I will do here is lay it all out in a narrative that you can use it to craft a response that works for you..
  • This is the starting point for many of our patrons and many of our staff I would also add frustration
  • Traditionally Publishers print 8 books in the theory that 1 of them will make moneyAnd the Profits from Best sellers allow publishers to publish mid-list titles.But Profits and advances are squeezed due to downward price pressure, competition and a crappy economy
  • How did they lose control? Authors, Agents, Publishers, and Retailers can now do each others jobsContent acquisitions – self publishContracts and agreements – standard kindle and B&N contracts, search the webEditorial development – social networks and social editingProduction editorial – graphic artists can be hiredOperations – hire a printerMarketing sales, and promotion – facebook, twitter, book talks
  • Put yourself in their place
  • In today’s world, there is nothing noble about not being able to monetize our content
  • The Old relationships don’t work for commoditized content. (Think of Border’s, Tower Records, BlockBuster)Publishers don’t want the library to be the channel for the public to get eBooks. They don’t want the impression that eBooks are cheaper than pBooks, That was the point of the whole Agency Pricing agreement.
  • Huge leverage of publishers as 60-75 % of revenue stream comes from 1 sellerAmazon’s pricing of 9.99 and its willingness to be a Lose money on each eBook sale lead to Agency Pricing model
  • Like music, movies, software, news, advertising
  • Music industry went digital (CD) before DMCA took effect. This allowed consumers to Rip music from CDs to computer and MP3 format legally.As mp3 was dominant format, the music vendors eventually came around.
  • What have they tried and why it reinforces that theyneed a channel to sell directly to the reader. Print on DemandStreaming BooksBundlingSubscription Agile publishing iBooks Author and Inkling - complete end to end publishing for the iOSBookboon.com - give away the drm free eBook with 6-9 advetrisments within each book, 11Million copies dirstributed
  • books aren't like movies, sculptures are like poems, emails and business documents aren't like Harry Potter books. Yet, we treat every single copyrighted work exactly the same way."The evidence in the marketplace shows that different works have a different market expectancy. I think what we need to do is give works the expectancy that they need, but not more ... If you look at the renewal records in the copyright office, you'll find a 15% renewal rate after 28 years, and you'll find different renewal rates — motion pictures have 75%; books have 7%. I think those are market signals. If copyright is an economic right, it makes sense to look at the market signals to see what the expected market life is for certain works and give them that term.“ (link) http://radar.oreilly.com/2012/03/copyright-terms-market-expectancy-toc.html
  • http://www.toccon.com/toc2012/public/schedule/detail/22283Joe Karaganis of the Social Science Research Council says He argued that the new enforcement measures (SOPA/PIPA/ACTA) realize this futility and so they instead focus on abridging due process: "The only way to scale up enforcement is to take it out of the courts, to make it an administrative function, and whenever possible, and automated one."
  • This action created an opening for Amazon to innovate and adopt library practices through their Prime Subscription program.
  • Both are words and sentences, the only difference is their location ePub format = Books as web pages Just another slice of the content pie
  • Our opportunity to use reader data as a means to target services or gain leverage has passed, we should focus our reader data on meeting local goals and objectivesNew publishers have all the data they need, we give it over every time we click.Digital divide will shift to:Device owners vs. not device ownersDesktop vs. mobile
  • Transcript

    • 1. “Atlas Shoved” “Publishers”Dude, What’s Your Problem? John Taube, MAPLA Presentation, 4/26/2012
    • 2. Typical Patron ExperienceSource: http://www.slideshare.net/bfoleary/read-2-is-mobile-and-global
    • 3. Where are we now ?• Publishers have lost control of the Book publishing marketplace and their existing relationships no longer work the way they used to.• Consequently, Libraries have also lost control
    • 4. What changed?• Thanks to web technologies all the traditional functions of a publisher can now be done by the author – Content acquisitions – Contracts and agreements – Editorial development – Production editorial – Operations – Marketing sales, and promotion
    • 5. Web Based Author Driven Publishing• 2 example -videos – Inkling -- https://vimeo.com/26935354 – Booktype -- https://vimeo.com/36686694
    • 6. Industry Comparison• Imagine you are the Ford Motor Company and• Imagine the availability of 3-D printable aerocar templates on torrents that you can print at the library, competing with existing cars. Source: Digital Books and Flying Cars: Libraries as Collateral Damage: Peter Brantley. Hatcher Gallery Recordings, University of Michigan Libraries. Presented 3/14/2012. URL: http://inst-tech.engin.umich.edu/leccap/view/gallery1-qs62mnczzu/16965
    • 7. What did the Web do?• “cut out the middle man”• Web is famous for driving out intermediaries between content and consumer.• We (libraries) are “middle men”
    • 8. On the Web, Books lose their aura• Books are now viewed as commodities – “ a good without qualitative distinction” – “the same regardless of who produces or sells it”• Books are consumable media just like music, movies, video games, news, & advertising• Cheapest way to distribute commodities is via web
    • 9. Publisher’s Holy Grail• Publishers need a channel to sell directly to the reader. Photo Courtesy of http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/mphg/mphg.htm
    • 10. The Masters of the Web have huge Advantages as New “Publishers”• The New Publishers… – Amazon – Apple – Google
    • 11. What Kind of Advantages?• They already have a comprehensive consumer facing content distribution platform• The web is their media, turf, and their marketplace• They have already mastered selling other content, music, books, grills, electronics, mail, news• They are responsible for 60-75% of all online book sales• They are making a profit – They can sell eBooks at a loss to increase sales of their devices. – They can give authors pre-pub advances.
    • 12. The New Publishers Viewpoint• eBooks are just another form of content to sell on the web that will attract consumers to purchase other goods and services.
    • 13. The Mechanics of New Publishers• Amazon, Apple, Google, “purchase” the eBooks from publishers• Publishers sell eBooks in “ePub” format.• Use publishers requirement of a DRM “wrapper” to prevent re-distribution of content to their advantage. – New publishers then add “Special Sauce”
    • 14. Special Sauce?• New Publishers agree to the DRM wrapper but go a step further, they add a “special sauce” to the wrapper so that the eBook is only readable on their own device. – Prevents reader from reading it on a competitors device – Locks consumer into purchasing future content from them and drives demand for their device.• Loss of a standard eBook format hurts competition (like mp3 for music). Source: Digital Books and Flying Cars: Libraries as Collateral Damage: Peter Brantley. Hatcher Gallery Recordings, University of Michigan Libraries. Presented 3/14/2012. URL: http://inst-tech.engin.umich.edu/leccap/view/gallery1-qs62mnczzu/16965
    • 15. Some Publisher’s efforts to re-take the market• Digitizing old content (backlist and mid list) – But still selling it thru current market? - nonstarter – Must negotiate digital rights with authors/agents• Outsource components of publishing model• Alternate publishing models – All the alternatives are web based, so still not native to publishers.
    • 16. Publisher’s efforts to re-take the market - 2 Using Copyright• Publishing has a business problem. Copyright is a legal tool, it is not a tool to solve a business problem.• Copyright does not add value to content – A works copyright status is not an added incentive to purchase it – Authors don’t get bigger advances if their work has a 70 year copyright vs. a 50 year copyright Source: Can We Have a Rational Discussion About Copyright?: Edward Nowatka and William Patry. Presentation at Tools of Change for Publishing Conference on 2/14/2012. Slides accessible: http://http://www.toccon.com/toc2012/public/schedule/detail/24466
    • 17. Publisher’s efforts to re-take the market – 3 SOPA/PIPA/ACTA/CISPA – Anti-Piracy• High prices for content, low incomes, and cheap digital technology are the main ingredients to keep piracy a viable model• The piracy infrastructure and tools enabling piracy have proliferated, but there have been no concurrent increases in income that would allow people to purchase content.• The majority of people do not view file sharing as a serious offense.• Corporate recourse to combat piracy is typically a “Raid” – "Its cheaper to buy cops than lawyers — raids are cheap, but due process is expensive and slow." Source: Copy Cultures: Joe Karaganis. Presentation at Tools of Change for Publishing Conference on 2/14/2012. Slides accessible: http://www.toccon.com/toc2012/public/schedule/detail/22283
    • 18. Publisher’s efforts to re-take the market - 4 Lock out Library eBook loaning• Kindle lending library is up to 100,000 titles, for $6.58 per month and publishers/authors get paid, each time the item is lent
    • 19. Publisher’s efforts to re-take the market - 5 Agency Pricing and the DoJ Lawsuit• eBooks will become dominant format• Publishers will have little control over whether their readers chooses e or p books• Publishers will not be able to create price barriers to eBook adoption by controlling price• Price of eBooks will go down in all venues
    • 20. Fickle Finger of Fate - Books• Distribution of Books via the internet will become the norm• Distinction between Books and web pages will further blur• Acceleration of eBook adoption• Books will never be finished• Books will never go out of print• Books will exist in a more densely packed media space.
    • 21. Fickle Finger of Fate - Libraries• Library’s role as content aggregator for the public will continue to dissipate. – Because eBooks and streaming media are not covered by the “First Sale Doctrine” we will have less to circulate• Young people switch media 27 times per hour – Libraries cannot provide that much content• The Digital Divide will persist
    • 22. Next Steps• As Library relationships and business models are permanently disrupted we cannot re take control in a marketplace with vanishing models, partners, and firms.• We must find a way to generate community profit from the current disruption found within our existing networks.
    • 23. Credits• Digital Books and Flying Cars: Libraries as Collateral Damage: Peter Brantley. Hatcher Gallery Recordings, University of Michigan Libraries. Presented 3/14/2012. URL: http://inst- tech.engin.umich.edu/leccap/view/gallery1-qs62mnczzu/16965• Study: Young Consumers Switch Media 27 Times An Hour: Brian Steinberg. Advertising Age, 4/9/2012. Accessed at: http://adage.com/article/news/study-young-consumers-switch-media-27-times- hour/234008/• Fallen agents - how everything just changed: Philip Jones. FutureBook, 4/12/2012. Accessed at: http://futurebook.net/content/fallen-agents• Read2.0 is mobile(and global): Brian O’Leary. NFAS Mobile Workshop Presentation given on 3/16/2012. Accessed at http://www.slideshare.net/bfoleary/read-2-is-mobile-and-global• Copy Cultures: Joe Karaganis. Presentation at Tools of Change for Publishing Conference on 2/14/2012. Slides accessible: http://www.toccon.com/toc2012/public/schedule/detail/22283• Can We Have a Rational Discussion About Copyright?: Edward Nowatka and William Patry. Presentation at Tools of Change for Publishing Conference on 2/14/2012. Slides accessible: http://http://www.toccon.com/toc2012/public/schedule/detail/24466• Battledecks- Julie Zamostny, Roller Derby suggested names, Thread on Facebook• PW Talks to Ann Arbor District Library’s Josie Parker and Eli Neiburger: Peter Brantley. Publisher’s Weekly, April 3, 2012. URL: http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/digital/content-and-e- books/article/51329-pw-talks-to-ann-arbor-district-library--s-josie-parker-and-eli-neiburger.html• Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto: Essays from the bleeding edge of publishing: Hugh McGuire, and Brian O’Leary, Eds. O’Reilly Media., 2012. URL: http://pressbooks.com/about/book-a-futurists-manifesto

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