Transforming your Organizational Culture (Omaha Young Professionals)
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Transforming your Organizational Culture (Omaha Young Professionals)

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slides from a joe gerstandt presentation on making your organizational culture more inclusive

slides from a joe gerstandt presentation on making your organizational culture more inclusive
@joegerstandt

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Transforming your Organizational Culture (Omaha Young Professionals) Transforming your Organizational Culture (Omaha Young Professionals) Presentation Transcript

  • “We need in every community a group of angelic troublemakers.” Bayard Rustin
  • joegerstandt.com joe.gerstandt@gmail.com linkedin.com/in/joegerstandt youtube.com/joegerstandt twitter.com/joegerstandt slideshare.net/joeg 402.740.7081
  • 1.language & logic 2.employment practices 3.orientation toward difference 4.decision making 5.relational networks 6.balanced outcomes 7.employee access 8.behavioral intelligence 9.inclusive leadership
  • 1.language & logic 2.employment practices 3.orientation toward difference 4.decision making 5.relational networks 6.balanced outcomes 7.employee access 8.behavioral intelligence 9.inclusive leadership what why how (measure) how (move)
  • 1.language & logic 2.employment practices 3.orientation toward difference 4.decision making 5.relational networks 6.balanced outcomes 7.employee access 8.behavioral intelligence 9.inclusive leadership
  • 1.language & logic 2.employment practices 3.orientation toward difference 4.decision making 5.relational networks 6.balanced outcomes 7.access 8.behavioral intelligence 9.inclusive leadership
  • What looks like resistance is often a lack of clarity. Switch, Dan and Chip Heath
  • The concept of diversity encompasses acceptance and respect.It means understanding that each individual is unique,and recognizing our individual differences.These can be alongthe dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs,political beliefs, or other ideologies.It is the explorationof these differences in a safe, positive, and nurturing environment.It is about understanding each other and moving beyondsimple tolerance to embracing and celebrating therich dimensions of diversity contained within each individual.
  • Similarities and differences amongemployeesinterms of age, cultural background, physicalabilitiesand disabilities, race, religion,sex, and sexualorientation.
  • diversity…
  • difference diversity…
  • di·ver·si·ty [dih-vur-si-tee] noun, plural –ties 1.the state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness. 2.variety; multiformity. 3.a point of difference.
  • difference relational diversity…
  • difference relational takes many forms diversity…
  • difference relational takes many forms disruptive diversity…
  • ↑diversity = ↑variance in performance groups with morediversity perform better or worse than groups with lessdiversity
  • identity diversity: Differences in our social identities. cognitive diversity: Differences in how we think and solve problems.
  • inclusion: The actions that we take to include additional difference in a process or group.
  • inclusion: “…being at home…” “…belonging…” “…able to bring my whole selfto work…” “…feeling that my unique contribution was valued…” “…my perspective is always considered…” “…I have a say in what happens…”
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness high valuein uniqueness
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. high valuein uniqueness
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high valuein uniqueness
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high valuein uniqueness differentiation: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider in the work group but their unique characteristics are seen as valuable and required for group / organization success.
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high valuein uniqueness differentiation: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider in the work group but their unique characteristics are seen as valuable and required for group / organization success. inclusion: Individual is treated as an insider and also allowed/encouraged to retain uniqueness within the work group.
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high valuein uniqueness differentiation: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider in the work group but their unique characteristics are seen as valuable and required for group / organization success. inclusion: Individual is treated as an insider and also allowed/encouraged to retain uniqueness within the work group.
  • self censorship playing small covering downplaying differences conforming Fear of Being Different Stifles Talent
  • •29% altered their attire, grooming or mannerisms to make their identity less obvious •40% refrained from behavior commonly associated with a given identity •57% avoided sticking up for their identity group •18% limited contact with members of a group they belong to
  • ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ??????Is it safe to be unpopular here???????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????
  • Groups often fail to outperform individuals because they prematurely move to consensus, with dissenting opinions being suppressed or dismissed. -Hackman & Morris, Advances in Experimental Social Psychology
  • groupthink: mode of thinking that happens when the desire for harmony in a decision-making group overrides a realistic appraisal of alternatives. Group members try to minimize conflict and reach a consensus decision without critical evaluation of alternative ideas or viewpoints.
  • dysfunctional
  • also dysfunctional
  • Group intelligence is not strongly tied to either the average intelligence of the members or the team’s smartest member. -Thomas Malone, MIT Center for Collective Intelligence
  • language & logic 1.Common language. 2.Clear and concise. 3.Consistently known. (what, why & how) 4.Business case.
  • 1.language & logic 2.employment practices 3.orientation toward difference 4.decision making 5.relational networks 6.balanced outcomes 7.employee access 8.behavioral intelligence 9.inclusive leadership
  • behavioral intelligence 1.Accurate understanding of human nature. 2.Variance in employee experience.
  • It requires no hatred or fear to assign meaning to the things that we see, we do it automatically. The problem is that we forget, do not realize, or deny that this even happens.
  • stereotype waitress librarian
  • smoke bowl eat hamburgers
  • smoke bowl eat hamburgers knit wear glasses eat salad
  • pygmalion effect Based on research by Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson, showing that biased expectations affect reality and create self- fulfilling prophecies as a result.
  • confirmation bias Our tendency to search for or interpret new information in a way that confirms preconceptions and avoids information and interpretations which contradict prior beliefs.
  • fundamental attribution error An unjustified tendency to assume that a person’s actions depend on what kind of person that person is rather than on the social environmental forces influencing the person.
  • homophily:the tendency of individuals to associate andbondwith similar others. More than 100studies have observed homophily in some form or another establishing that similarity breeds connection. These include age, gender, class, and organizational role.
  • If you do not intentionally, include, you will unintentionally exclude.
  • When Performance Trumps Gender Bias: Joint versus Separate Evaluation Iris Bohnet Alexandra van Geen Max H. Bazerman Harvard Business School Working Paper 12-083 | March, 2012
  • work to have a beginners mind
  • seek novelty
  • “We need in every community a group of angelic troublemakers.” Bayard Rustin