Stratofox Aerospace Tracking Team Presented by Ian Kluft KO6YQ ARRL EmCommWest/ Pacificon  2009 Reno, Nevada May 2, 2009
About Stratofox
About Stratofox <ul><li>We're an amateur group which performs tracking services for high altitude rocket and balloon flights
Our team has familiarity with the Black Rock Desert region, a rocket launch site in Northern Nevada
Members have experience in high-power rocketry, Ham Radio, 4x4, amateur astronomy, search & rescue, wilderness first respo...
Our goal is to get invitations to “all the cool launches” for our members and help the civilian entrepreneurial aerospace ...
What does Stratofox's name mean? <ul><li>It stands for “Stratospheric foxhunt”
The Stratosphere is the layer of the atmosphere from 40,000' to 120,000'
Hams call a hidden transmitter search a “foxhunt”
The most challenging type of transmitter hunt is one where the transmitter fell from the sky
So no one can tell you where they hid it
That's what we do </li></ul>
Quick History <ul><li>Founded in late 2002
First high-altitude rocket recovery in June 2003 – Paragon Labs' Dragoon I (mid-altitude systems test) altitude 16 miles, ...
Recovered first amateur rocket launched to space, CSXT Space Shot in May 2004 altitude 72 miles, found 18 miles away
Recovered 8 high-altitude balloons in 2007-2008 for Stanford University and NASA Ames which flew to altitudes up to 100,00...
Which events has Stratofox supported? <ul><li>Paragon Dragoon I, II, IIB 2003-2005
CSXT Space Shot 2004
AeroPac To100K (3 launches) 2005-2006
Stanford BioLaunch B07A-F/B08A-B 2007-present
Soka University (Japan) CanSat recovery 2008 </li></ul>
Stratofox and Paragon start together <ul><li>Paragon's test launch of Dragoon I in 2003 was Stratofox's first recovery
Continued to support Paragon space launch efforts in 2004 and 2005
Assistance planned as ground crew for Lunar Lander Challenge </li></ul>Stratofox locates Paragon Dragoon I in 15 minutes (...
CSXT Space Shot 2004 <ul><li>First amateur rocket launch to space
Launched 11:12AM May 17, 2004
Suborbital flight to 72 mi, 115km, 380,000'
Landed 18 mi / 25 km away
ARRL news reported on success of “rocket carrying amateur radio”
This photo on display in ARRL HQ lobby in Newington CT </li></ul>Photo by Ian Kluft KO6YQ
CSXT Space Shot 2004 Stratofox recovers the spacecraft <ul><li>Used radio direction finding for secondary beacon (by Merli...
almost got there on first day – had to get everyone off mountain before dark
rescued two spectators who were also trying to look for it and broke down
found it at 6100' elevation around noon on May 18 </li></ul>Stratofox group picture: Will Galloway AE6EY, Ian Kluft KO6YQ,...
Search for missing CSXT booster <ul><li>No signals heard from the booster after descent and was presumed lost
In July 2004, CSXT analysis of Stratofox audio recording of the sonic boom indicated that booster's parachute was deployed...
Ground searches were done in August. </li></ul>
Missing CSXT booster recovered November 2004 <ul><li>Nov 10 - BLM chartered helicopter doing survey of wild horses finds t...
Nov 15 - BLM notifies CSXT and Stratofox
Nov 26 – Stratofox 4x4 expedition in mud/snow recovers the booster hours before a snowstorm </li></ul>Photo by Ken Samuels...
Stratofox recovers CSXT booster Booster lost radio transmitters on re-entry – recovered 6 months later
AeroPac To100K launches <ul><li>3 launches in 2005-2006
Attempts to reach 100,000' with commercial hobby motors
Stratofox supported with air and ground search, radio communications and safety coordination </li></ul>AeroPac To100K laun...
Stanford BioLaunch balloons <ul><li>NASA-funded balloon experiments
Stratofox supported balloon flights by Stanford University
Stratofox supported with air & ground search, communications and safety coordination
Stanford was so confident in Stratofox that B07E/F and B08A/B were flown in pairs </li></ul>B07A Jan 2007 near Gilroy, Cal...
Stanford BioLaunch balloons B07C May 2007 near Tracy, California B07F Dec 2007 near Los Banos, California B08A Mar 2008 ne...
Soka University CanSat Search <ul><li>AeroPac & Stanford launched a CanSat on a rocket for Soka University (Japan) at Blac...
CanSat was not recovered
Stratofox was called for help
3x3 mile search area
Outlook: very unlikely! </li></ul>Stratofox planned a 3x3 mile visual search area across the Quinn River Sink at the Black...
Soka University CanSat search <ul><li>Stratofox expedition to search for missing CanSat on Nov 23, 2008
With some planning and lots of luck...  we found it!
A CanSat is the size of a soda can
Transmitter was dead
Found in visual search </li></ul>Worse than a needle in a haystack: a CanSat in the Black Rock Desert (with dead transmitt...
Soka University CanSat search
Soka University CanSat search
Soka University CanSat search CanSat handoff at AeroPac holiday party Dec 7, 2008 in Pacifica, CA
Other potential upcoming launch support <ul><li>UP Aerospace commercial launch company formed by CSXT leaders
Lunar Lander Challenge ground crew for Masten Space, Paragon and SpeedUp
Sugar Shot 2 Space seeking first amateur launch to space using amateur propellants
Various amateur and entrepreneurial projects balloons and rockets as we're invited to help </li></ul>
Mars Society's “TEMPO Cubed” Project <ul><li>Tethered Experiment for Mars interPlanetary Operations Cubed
CubeSats in centrifugal “artificial gravity”
Satellite launch funding delayed in 2008
Stratofox beginning to assist with building high-altitude balloon-drop platform so the research can continue
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Stratofox Aerospaced Tracking Team presentation at Pacificon/EmCommWest in Reno, Nevada, May 2, 2009

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Pacificon 200905

  1. 1. Stratofox Aerospace Tracking Team Presented by Ian Kluft KO6YQ ARRL EmCommWest/ Pacificon 2009 Reno, Nevada May 2, 2009
  2. 2. About Stratofox
  3. 3. About Stratofox <ul><li>We're an amateur group which performs tracking services for high altitude rocket and balloon flights
  4. 4. Our team has familiarity with the Black Rock Desert region, a rocket launch site in Northern Nevada
  5. 5. Members have experience in high-power rocketry, Ham Radio, 4x4, amateur astronomy, search & rescue, wilderness first responder, etc
  6. 6. Our goal is to get invitations to “all the cool launches” for our members and help the civilian entrepreneurial aerospace industry get off the ground </li></ul>
  7. 7. What does Stratofox's name mean? <ul><li>It stands for “Stratospheric foxhunt”
  8. 8. The Stratosphere is the layer of the atmosphere from 40,000' to 120,000'
  9. 9. Hams call a hidden transmitter search a “foxhunt”
  10. 10. The most challenging type of transmitter hunt is one where the transmitter fell from the sky
  11. 11. So no one can tell you where they hid it
  12. 12. That's what we do </li></ul>
  13. 13. Quick History <ul><li>Founded in late 2002
  14. 14. First high-altitude rocket recovery in June 2003 – Paragon Labs' Dragoon I (mid-altitude systems test) altitude 16 miles, found 6 miles away
  15. 15. Recovered first amateur rocket launched to space, CSXT Space Shot in May 2004 altitude 72 miles, found 18 miles away
  16. 16. Recovered 8 high-altitude balloons in 2007-2008 for Stanford University and NASA Ames which flew to altitudes up to 100,000', found up to 80 miles away </li></ul>
  17. 17. Which events has Stratofox supported? <ul><li>Paragon Dragoon I, II, IIB 2003-2005
  18. 18. CSXT Space Shot 2004
  19. 19. AeroPac To100K (3 launches) 2005-2006
  20. 20. Stanford BioLaunch B07A-F/B08A-B 2007-present
  21. 21. Soka University (Japan) CanSat recovery 2008 </li></ul>
  22. 22. Stratofox and Paragon start together <ul><li>Paragon's test launch of Dragoon I in 2003 was Stratofox's first recovery
  23. 23. Continued to support Paragon space launch efforts in 2004 and 2005
  24. 24. Assistance planned as ground crew for Lunar Lander Challenge </li></ul>Stratofox locates Paragon Dragoon I in 15 minutes (June 2003)
  25. 25. CSXT Space Shot 2004 <ul><li>First amateur rocket launch to space
  26. 26. Launched 11:12AM May 17, 2004
  27. 27. Suborbital flight to 72 mi, 115km, 380,000'
  28. 28. Landed 18 mi / 25 km away
  29. 29. ARRL news reported on success of “rocket carrying amateur radio”
  30. 30. This photo on display in ARRL HQ lobby in Newington CT </li></ul>Photo by Ian Kluft KO6YQ
  31. 31. CSXT Space Shot 2004 Stratofox recovers the spacecraft <ul><li>Used radio direction finding for secondary beacon (by Merlin Systems of Boise ID) attached to parachute
  32. 32. almost got there on first day – had to get everyone off mountain before dark
  33. 33. rescued two spectators who were also trying to look for it and broke down
  34. 34. found it at 6100' elevation around noon on May 18 </li></ul>Stratofox group picture: Will Galloway AE6EY, Ian Kluft KO6YQ, Jeremy Cooper KE6JJJ, Sean Lynch KG6CVV, Randy Palmer WA6LCD, Steve Palmer KA6DHU and Rob Palmer. Not shown: Diane Palmer KC6HVP, Christian Void KF6IHU, Colleen Brennan and Jay Lawson.
  35. 35. Search for missing CSXT booster <ul><li>No signals heard from the booster after descent and was presumed lost
  36. 36. In July 2004, CSXT analysis of Stratofox audio recording of the sonic boom indicated that booster's parachute was deployed on re-entry.
  37. 37. Ground searches were done in August. </li></ul>
  38. 38. Missing CSXT booster recovered November 2004 <ul><li>Nov 10 - BLM chartered helicopter doing survey of wild horses finds the booster near where we had searched
  39. 39. Nov 15 - BLM notifies CSXT and Stratofox
  40. 40. Nov 26 – Stratofox 4x4 expedition in mud/snow recovers the booster hours before a snowstorm </li></ul>Photo by Ken Samuelson KS2R
  41. 41. Stratofox recovers CSXT booster Booster lost radio transmitters on re-entry – recovered 6 months later
  42. 42. AeroPac To100K launches <ul><li>3 launches in 2005-2006
  43. 43. Attempts to reach 100,000' with commercial hobby motors
  44. 44. Stratofox supported with air and ground search, radio communications and safety coordination </li></ul>AeroPac To100K launches at Nevada's Black Rock Desert
  45. 45. Stanford BioLaunch balloons <ul><li>NASA-funded balloon experiments
  46. 46. Stratofox supported balloon flights by Stanford University
  47. 47. Stratofox supported with air & ground search, communications and safety coordination
  48. 48. Stanford was so confident in Stratofox that B07E/F and B08A/B were flown in pairs </li></ul>B07A Jan 2007 near Gilroy, California
  49. 49. Stanford BioLaunch balloons B07C May 2007 near Tracy, California B07F Dec 2007 near Los Banos, California B08A Mar 2008 near Merced, California
  50. 50. Soka University CanSat Search <ul><li>AeroPac & Stanford launched a CanSat on a rocket for Soka University (Japan) at Black Rock in Sept 2008
  51. 51. CanSat was not recovered
  52. 52. Stratofox was called for help
  53. 53. 3x3 mile search area
  54. 54. Outlook: very unlikely! </li></ul>Stratofox planned a 3x3 mile visual search area across the Quinn River Sink at the Black Rock Desert
  55. 55. Soka University CanSat search <ul><li>Stratofox expedition to search for missing CanSat on Nov 23, 2008
  56. 56. With some planning and lots of luck... we found it!
  57. 57. A CanSat is the size of a soda can
  58. 58. Transmitter was dead
  59. 59. Found in visual search </li></ul>Worse than a needle in a haystack: a CanSat in the Black Rock Desert (with dead transmitter!)
  60. 60. Soka University CanSat search
  61. 61. Soka University CanSat search
  62. 62. Soka University CanSat search CanSat handoff at AeroPac holiday party Dec 7, 2008 in Pacifica, CA
  63. 63. Other potential upcoming launch support <ul><li>UP Aerospace commercial launch company formed by CSXT leaders
  64. 64. Lunar Lander Challenge ground crew for Masten Space, Paragon and SpeedUp
  65. 65. Sugar Shot 2 Space seeking first amateur launch to space using amateur propellants
  66. 66. Various amateur and entrepreneurial projects balloons and rockets as we're invited to help </li></ul>
  67. 67. Mars Society's “TEMPO Cubed” Project <ul><li>Tethered Experiment for Mars interPlanetary Operations Cubed
  68. 68. CubeSats in centrifugal “artificial gravity”
  69. 69. Satellite launch funding delayed in 2008
  70. 70. Stratofox beginning to assist with building high-altitude balloon-drop platform so the research can continue
  71. 71. New Stratofox project as of March 2009
  72. 72. http://marssociety.org/portal/c/TEMPO3 </li></ul>Image credit: CL Vancil/Mars Society
  73. 73. Embry-Riddle Icarus III Rocket <ul><li>Research sounding rocket intended to reach altitudes of 45-50 miles / 72-80 km
  74. 74. Planned launch at Black Rock Desert in October 2009
  75. 75. Stratofox to support clearing the downrange area and search & recovery of the rocket
  76. 76. New Stratofox project as of April 2009 </li></ul>Image credit: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  77. 77. Amateur Radio at Stratofox <ul><li>The original dozen founders in 2002 were all Hams
  78. 78. The group is still mostly Hams at 55 members
  79. 79. Often members who join having other useful skills still choose to get an Amateur Radio license after seeing it in use
  80. 80. Spotty/no cell coverage areas require a Ham in every vehicle
  81. 81. All vehicles transmit APRS for a “last known position”
  82. 82. Rockets and balloons usually transmit APRS
  83. 83. Backup beacons may require use of radio direction finding </li></ul>
  84. 84. Amateur Radio at Stratofox Photo: Stratofox net control station at CSXT Space Shot on May 17, 2004 Stratofox coordinated observers via Amateur Radio to verify nobody was in the downrange area of the vast Black Rock Desert The countdown resumed at T-60 seconds after Stratofox made the call on CSXT's commercial radio: “Range Safety is GO for launch!” Mike Money AC7TT and Steve Palmer KA6DHU photo by Ian Kluft KO6YQ
  85. 85. Amateur Radio at Stratofox Photo: monitoring the flight of Stanford BioLaunch B07A near Hollister, CA in March 2007 Bryan Klofas KF6ZEO waits ready for tracking with APRS or RDF
  86. 86. Amateur Radio at Stratofox Photo: BioLaunch B07B in May 2007 Airborne tracker Craig Anderson N6YXK with his Amateur Radio radio gear in the Cessna 182 chase plane before the flight Photo by chase pilot James Mack KI6LQA
  87. 87. Amateur Radio at Stratofox Photo: laptop screenshot on chase plane for BioLaunch B07B in May 2007 Green line shows the chase plane enroute to the Lodi Airport after photographing the balloon launch at Mt Hamilton Red line shows the balloon climbing through 40,000' Pilot: James Mack KI6LQA Tracker: Craig Anderson N6YXK
  88. 88. Amateur Radio at Stratofox Photo: on the hunt for Stanford BioLaunch B07C near Tracy, CA in June 2007 Marcin Hirny N9ZTZ drives Andy Selle KI6JQU tracks APRS Heather Stern KG6ZYC navigates
  89. 89. Training and Recreation Photo: Sunset at Stratofox camp at “Upper High Dry” Lakebed in the Black Rock Desert in September 2008
  90. 90. Camping and Exploration <ul><li>Stratofox tries to schedule a recreational camping and exploration trip to the Black Rock Desert each year
  91. 91. It helps train new members about the area
  92. 92. It gives us a chance to explore areas related to upcoming events without pressure
  93. 93. We always maintain contact by Amateur Radio
  94. 94. Nearest cell coverage is 80 miles south </li></ul>
  95. 95. Recreational trips to the Black Rock Desert <ul><li>Stratofox 1 – Sept 2002 founding event of Stratofox
  96. 96. Stratofox 2 – Aug 2003 training for CSXT and Paragon space shots
  97. 97. Stratofox 3 – Sept 2006 exploring after busy years w/ space launches
  98. 98. Stratofox 4 – Aug 2007 exploration in the Black Rock Range
  99. 99. Stratofox 5 – Sept 2008 exploration in the Black Rock Range </li></ul>
  100. 100. Other research resulting from Stratofox exploration Photo: Stratofox member Bob Verish examines rocks in the Black Rock Range
  101. 101. Suspected impact crater found <ul><li>Clues in the rocks found all over the region during rocket and balloon hunting activities
  102. 102. If confirmed, 54 mile / 87 km diameter would be 2nd largest in US (after Chesapeake Bay)
  103. 103. Age unknown – many millions of years by amount of erosion
  104. 104. Discover Magazine mentioned the research in Dec 2008 </li></ul>
  105. 105. Volunteering for Stratofox Stratofox camp sites may include bicycles, 4x4s and airplanes
  106. 106. If you're interested in Stratofox <ul><li>Stratofox is admittedly picky about new membership
  107. 107. We have to keep the group trustworthy because some of our partner organizations have considered each other competitors before and others probably will again
  108. 108. We have to be trusted by all parties
  109. 109. There is no room for spectators in the deep desert – everyone has to “carry their own weight” out there
  110. 110. Potential new members need to have a useful skill </li></ul>
  111. 111. If you're interested in Stratofox <ul><li>You may be referred as a potential new member by any team member who thinks you have what it takes
  112. 112. This puts you on “invitee” status
  113. 113. Invitees can earn full membership by participating in an event
  114. 114. After participating, you can be voted onto the team </li><ul><li>How well did you do your part?
  115. 115. How well did you help the team achieve its goals?
  116. 116. How well did you get along with the team? </li></ul></ul>
  117. 117. Useful skills for membership <ul><li>Amateur Radio license
  118. 118. Navigation, GPS & maps
  119. 119. 4x4/off-roading
  120. 120. High-power rocketry cert
  121. 121. Private Pilot or better
  122. 122. Own an airplane
  123. 123. Astronomy </li></ul><ul><li>Electronics or Aerospace Engineering
  124. 124. Search & Rescue
  125. 125. Emergency medical training (WFR, EMT)
  126. 126. Logistical planning
  127. 127. Got something else you think is useful? Ask! </li></ul><ul><li>Any of these, the more the better </li></ul>
  128. 128. Out of pocket expenses <ul><li>Historically, all Stratofox volunteers have handled their expenses out of pocket
  129. 129. Stratofox's parent/umbrella corporation was granted 501(c)3 status in 2007, CA tax exemption in 2008
  130. 130. Volunteer expenses are now tax-deductible </li><ul><li>Record your mileage and keep your receipts </li></ul><li>Donations are now tax-deductible
  131. 131. Some situations may arise where we can reimburse volunteers for expenses – but don't count on that </li></ul>
  132. 132. For more information... <ul><li>Web site: http://www.stratofox.org/
  133. 133. Talk mail list – public aerospace discussion
  134. 134. Announce-only mail list – if you only want announcements </li></ul>
  135. 135. The end Photo: Stratofox ground crew gives the shutdown signal to search plane pilot at AeroPac To100K in September 2005 Pilot: Ben Woodard KG6FNK Ground: Owen DeLong KB6MER Note: ground crew giving signals to pilots must be pilots too
  136. 136. Additional slides for Q&A (just in case)
  137. 137. Search for Columbia's Debris 6 <ul><li>Enough eyewitness video of Debris 6 for Stratofox member Rob Matson to narrow estimated impact area
  138. 138. 2x24 mile area in SE NV & SW UT
  139. 139. NASA canceled ground search in western states after 2 weeks
  140. 140. Apparent correlation between Matson estimate and Delamar NV eyewitness account of falling debris
  141. 141. Stratofox searches in 4/2004, 7/2005 & 9/2006 </li></ul>
  142. 142. 2004-2005 Paragon space launch attempts <ul><li>Dragoon II June 7, 2004 launch in 1 st day's window nozzle failure at liftoff, rocket impacted 3 miles away
  143. 143. Dragoon IIB Sept 27, 2005 launch in 2 nd day's window payload separation in flight, booster impacted ¾ mile away </li></ul>
  144. 144. 2004-2005 Paragon space launch attempts
  145. 145. 2005-2006 AeroPac “To100K” <ul><li>Rocket club effort to build a rocket to exceed 100,000' with commercially-available solid motors
  146. 146. 3 attempts spanning 2005 and 2006
  147. 147. First stage (booster) always worked
  148. 148. Different failure every time for the 2nd stage
  149. 149. Currently in redesign </li></ul>
  150. 150. 2005-2006 AeroPac “To100K”
  151. 151. Stanford BioLaunch balloons Photo: Visual acquisition from the Tracy Airport of B07C climbing through 30,000' Shown left to right: Christina Mester AF6BW, Brad Douglas KB8UYR, Bryan Klofas KF6ZEO, Steve Rubin AE6CH, Marcin Hirny N9ZTZ
  152. 152. Stanford BioLaunch balloons <ul><li>“ BioLaunch” name comes from primary research, exposing DNA samples to solar radiation at altitude
  153. 153. Stanford Aerospace Engineering students also fly satellite electronics to test in near vacuum
  154. 154. K12 student experiments on some flights </li></ul>
  155. 155. BioLaunch B07A – March 2007 <ul><li>BioLaunch B07A – March 10, 2007 launched from Mt Hamilton landed in Henry Coe State Park
  156. 156. Landed on top of a tree
  157. 157. Successful same-day recovery enabled Stanford to present results to NASA promptly, which enabled further research funding </li></ul>
  158. 158. BioLaunch B07A – March 2007 <ul><li>Sometimes when you find it, you aren't done yet </li></ul>
  159. 159. BioLaunch B07B – May 2007 <ul><li>BioLaunch B07B – May 11, 2007 launched from Mt Hamilton landed NE of Lodi next to Mokelumne River
  160. 160. Landed on top of a tree again (Stanford's mascot is a tree)
  161. 161. Stratofox chase plane crew found payloads within 10 minutes of payload touchdown </li></ul>
  162. 162. BioLaunch B07B – May 2007
  163. 163. BioLaunch B07C – June 2007 <ul><li>BioLaunch B07C – June 9, 2007 launched from Galt (south of Sacramento) landed north of Tracy in San Joaquin Delta
  164. 164. Landed in corn field right down the furrow
  165. 165. Stratofox chase plane crew found it within 15 minutes of payload touchdown </li></ul>
  166. 166. BioLaunch B07C – June 2007 <ul><li>Again, the plane found it in minutes where ground search might have taken hours
  167. 167. Ham Radio APRS telemetry received by air and ground crews
  168. 168. Plane crew “talked in” the ground crews to the site </li></ul>
  169. 169. BioLaunch B07D – Aug 2007 <ul><li>BioLaunch B07D – Aug 4, 2007 launched from Casa de Fruta (E of Gilroy)
  170. 170. Part of payload separated and landed in mountains
  171. 171. Remainder landed in San Joaquin Valley orchard
  172. 172. All day+evening search, both parts recovered </li></ul>
  173. 173. BioLaunch B07E/F – Dec 2007 <ul><li>BioLaunch B07E & B07F – Dec 15, 2007 launched from Casa de Fruta (E of Gilroy)
  174. 174. B07E flew to 95,000', landed SW of Los Banos
  175. 175. B07F aborted at 30,000' by Stanford landed near junction of I-5 and SR 165
  176. 176. Both recovered in time for lunch
  177. 177. Plane grounded in San Jose due to fog arrived 3 minutes after B07E recovery </li></ul>
  178. 178. BioLaunch B08A/B – Mar 2008 <ul><li>BioLaunch B08A & B08B – Mar 8, 2008 launched from Galt (south of Sacramento)
  179. 179. 3 Stratofox teams started at the launch site
  180. 180. 3 started at the Madera Airport (north of Fresno)
  181. 181. Both balloons landed near Merced
  182. 182. Both recovered in time for lunch (again!)
  183. 183. B08A flew to 107,000'
  184. 184. B08B flew to 68,000' (as high as planned) </li></ul>
  185. 185. Stratofox at the Fossett search Photo: Sept 9, 2007 crew at the Minden NV Airport Bob Verish, Brad Douglas KB8UYR, Greg Retkowski KI4NQF, Ian Kluft KO6YQ and Bernhard Hailer AE6YN with Greg's plane at the Minden NV Airport on Sept 8, 2007. (Yes it's normal for a Long-EZ to park with the nose gear stowed.)
  186. 186. Stratofox at the Fossett Search <ul><li>Stratofox is not a Search & Rescue organization
  187. 187. But we have search & rescue expertise for our own crews' safety and anyone we find who needs help
  188. 188. During Fossett search, Stratofox had numerous tips which we passed to CAP
  189. 189. In 4 different cases, we were in positions to help and members stepped up to the task
  190. 190. Amateur Radio used to track safety of our members </li></ul>
  191. 191. Stratofox at the Fossett search September 2007 <ul><li>Sept 3 – Fossett reported missing
  192. 192. Sept 4 – CAP begins search
  193. 193. Sept 7-8 – Stratofox aerial search near Eureka NV
  194. 194. Sept 8-9 – Stratofox ground search Minden NV to Mono Lake CA
  195. 195. Sept 11 – Stratofox aerial search near Topaz CA
  196. 196. Sept 13 – ELT heard near Mammoth/Mono Lake
  197. 197. Sept 14 – Stratofox ground search at Mammoth </li></ul>
  198. 198. Sept 7-8: Eureka NV search <ul><li>Sept 5: Eureka County NV Sheriff received report that a geologist heard an “aircraft in distress” at noon 9/3
  199. 199. No way to know - Fossett, other aircraft, false alarm?
  200. 200. CAP too overwhelmed to help Eureka County
  201. 201. Sept 7-8: Stratofox member Greg Retkowski KI4NQF flew to Eureka to help with grid search
  202. 202. No planes in grid area - determined to be false alarm
  203. 203. Thunderstorm turbulence at time of report probably refracted sounds of US 50 traffic back to ground </li></ul>
  204. 204. Sept 8-9: Minden to Mono Lake <ul><li>CAP accepted when we offered to help search
  205. 205. Stratofox ground crew arrived in Minden Sept 7
  206. 206. Pilot Greg KI4NQF arrived from Eureka Sept 8
  207. 207. CAP withdrew offer for concern of collision risk
  208. 208. Asked us to search on ground only – we complied
  209. 209. Stratofox members heard from friend of Fossett that he was headed “south along 395”
  210. 210. binocular searches from Minden to Mono Lake </li></ul>
  211. 211. Sept 7-9 search participants <ul><li>David Brock N6DCB – point of contact
  212. 212. Brad Douglas KB8UYR
  213. 213. Bernhard Hailer AE6YN (*)
  214. 214. Ian Kluft KO6YQ
  215. 215. Greg Retkowski KI4NQF – pilot/plane owner
  216. 216. Bob Verish (*) </li></ul>(*) indicates participation in this event qualified for Stratofox membership
  217. 217. Sept 10, 2007: plane in sat photo Before After That's an airplane – and the right size found by Internet volunteer Drew Smith
  218. 218. Sept 11, 2007: aerial search GPS: 9/8 ground and 9/11 aerial Definitely no airplane there We determined the plane in the sat photo was in flight at the time
  219. 219. Sept 11, 2007 participants <ul><li>Brad Douglas KB8UYR – point of contact
  220. 220. Ian Kluft KO6YQ - binoculars/photographer
  221. 221. Ben Woodard KG6FNK – pilot/plane owner </li></ul>
  222. 222. Sept 13: ELT heard near Mono Lake <ul><li>Stratofox member Steve Rubin AE6CH, not involved in but aware of the search, heard an Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT)
  223. 223. He was flying a Cessna 210 from Santa Monica to Reno west of the crest of the Sierras
  224. 224. ELT reported “25 mi west to south of Mono Lake”
  225. 225. He reported it to Air Traffic Control and to the Stratofox team
  226. 226. Stratofox forwarded report to Fossett family & CAP </li></ul>
  227. 227. Sept 14: ground search from Mono Lake to Mammoth Lakes <ul><li>Based on previous evening's ELT report
  228. 228. Ground search by Ian Kluft KO6YQ monitored for ELT from Mono Lake to Mammoth Lakes
  229. 229. Deep-freeze nights left no hope of finding survivor
  230. 230. Now after the wreckage was found we know... </li><ul><li>ELT was destroyed in crash, not transmitting
  231. 231. Ridge would have blocked ELT signal if operating
  232. 232. At nearest this was 8 miles from crash site </li></ul></ul>
  233. 233. Stratofox at the Fossett search <ul><li>Needle in a haystack search
  234. 234. Odd circumstances with CAP overwhelmed by reports
  235. 235. When Stratofox had info, we always forwarded it
  236. 236. Normally we're not a search & rescue organization
  237. 237. The thought at the time was that Fossett might be waiting for a rescue
  238. 238. Now we know it was too late before searches started
  239. 239. Team members still feel proud of our efforts </li></ul>
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