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Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
Focus on the Future
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Focus on the Future

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Presentation for BALIS, March 4th 2011. Focus on the Future: Children, eBooks, and the path to digital

Presentation for BALIS, March 4th 2011. Focus on the Future: Children, eBooks, and the path to digital

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  • As X said, my daughter (3 in December) was nice enough to let me come out here today, and I thought I’d start my time with a....\n
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  • We have a problem. But it’s not the problem that you think it is. It’s the next slide.\n
  • http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2011/02/geekdad-opinion-the-future-of-childrens-ebooks/\n
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  • 6.5% of the cost over 20 years. And Moore’s law tells us that cost doesn’t equal reduced capability...indeed, it means an increase in capabilities over the cost of the reduction in price. There is no other good that I can think of that gets cheaper AND better at the same time. \n
  • 6.5% of the cost over 20 years. And Moore’s law tells us that cost doesn’t equal reduced capability...indeed, it means an increase in capabilities over the cost of the reduction in price. There is no other good that I can think of that gets cheaper AND better at the same time. \n
  • 6.5% of the cost over 20 years. And Moore’s law tells us that cost doesn’t equal reduced capability...indeed, it means an increase in capabilities over the cost of the reduction in price. There is no other good that I can think of that gets cheaper AND better at the same time. \n
  • 6.5% of the cost over 20 years. And Moore’s law tells us that cost doesn’t equal reduced capability...indeed, it means an increase in capabilities over the cost of the reduction in price. There is no other good that I can think of that gets cheaper AND better at the same time. \n
  • In October 2009 John Walkenbach noticed that the price of the Kindle was falling at a consistent rate, lowering almost on a schedule. By June 2010, the rate was so unwavering that he could easily forecast the date at which the Kindle would be free: November 2011.\nSince then I've mentioned this forecast to all kinds of folks. In August, 2010 I had the chance to point it out to Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon. He merely smiled and said, "Oh, you noticed that!" And then smiled again.\nWhen I brought it to the attention of publishing veterans they would often laugh nervously. How outrageous! they would say. It must cost something to make? The trick was figuring out how Amazon could bundle the free Kindle and still make money. My thought was the cell phone model: a free Kindle if you buy X number of e-books.\n\n\n
  • kids just understand how to use the ipad and the iphone. iOS is an amazing feat of UI enginnering.\n
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  • in the first generation of print, we got...well, we got a lot, but it took almost 50 years (gutenberg in 1440 to la morte d’artur in 1485) or 170 years before we got a novel after the invention of the printing press (Gutenberg around 1440, and Don Quixote in 1605.\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. focus on the future children, ebooks, and the path to digital
    • 2. let’s start with a story
    • 3. once upon a time...
    • 4. there was a princess...
    • 5. the princessloved stories
    • 6. but the princess also loved screens
    • 7. all sortsof screens
    • 8. she likedinteractive stories
    • 9. and as she ages, I’m betting she reads a lot more on a screen than on paper
    • 10. four issues for libraries
    • 11. content vs container
    • 12. personal electronics are personal
    • 13. digital divide
    • 14. smartphones will dominate
    • 15. cost to manufacture
    • 16. Less than 10%
    • 17. Less than 10%
    • 18. interface is everything
    • 19. iOS
    • 20. iPad 2
    • 21. android
    • 22. first generation
    • 23. happily ever after?
    • 24. thank you
    • 25. Jason GriffeyEmail: griffey@gmail.comSite: jasongriffey.netgVoice: 423-443-4770Twitter: @griffeyOther: Perpetual Beta ALA TechSource Head of Library Information Technology http://pinboard.in/u:griffey/ University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

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