Updated May 2014! Whitepaper 'Digital Marketing to 'Generation SpongeBob' (Generation Z) - new extended version!
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Updated May 2014! Whitepaper 'Digital Marketing to 'Generation SpongeBob' (Generation Z) - new extended version!

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TABLE OF CONTENTS ...

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
The importance of kids marketing
‘Generation Spongebob’
A new generation of mums & dads
Digital media consumption
Kids & digital marketing
Trends in digital kids marketing (details: see below)
Usability
Legal & ethical considerations
References / further reading

OVERVIEW OF THE TRENDS SECTION

The digital revolution

Digital kids are the trend
Ban digital advertising!
Ban digital!
Revolutionizing brands

The content
Storytelling
Humor please!
Video is king
Characters and Santa Claus
Boys & girls
Real is beautiful
Mini rules
Happiness and well-being
Sophistication

The interaction
Co-creation
Starification
Points, degrees, badges
A vocal generation
Helpful brands
The second screen
Advergames as goodies

Social media
The ephemeral social
Protected social networks
The rising power of Twitter

Everything connected
The cross-channel approach
Immersive experiences
The mobile kid
The internet of things
Digital at the point of sales
Augmented reality
The wired kid
Virtual reality
Code-mania
Wearables

Digital mums
Nothing less than perfection
Educate kids and sell to parents
Inform the parents
Celebrating heroic mums
Imperfect mums
Nostalgic mums
The inclusive experience

The business perspective
Big data
Growth hacking
Crowdsourcing
Struggling with business models

Opportunities for innovation

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Updated May 2014! Whitepaper 'Digital Marketing to 'Generation SpongeBob' (Generation Z) - new extended version! Updated May 2014! Whitepaper 'Digital Marketing to 'Generation SpongeBob' (Generation Z) - new extended version! Document Transcript

  • Digital Marketing to Kids 1 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Digital Marketing to ‘Generation SpongeBob’ Whitepaper - update May 2014 Gerda Van Damme - Guido Janssens (Dreammachine Kids)
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 2 Communications to kids through digital media require a specific approach. Understanding of usability requirements, legal and ethical concerns, deep knowledge of kids’ interests, sensibilities, ideals, fears and hopes... these are just a few of the skills you should ask from your agency when targeting kids. Dreammachine Kids offers you this knowledge. We help you find. the emotional touchpoints with your brand through successful digital marketing projects for kids and their mums. Some of the clients include Disneyland Paris, Atoma, Le Chat, Woeffies, Grany, Danone, and many other A-brands. Interested to know more about our services? Mail us at kids@dreammachine.be. Strategic services of Dreammachine Kids: • Analysis of existing projects • Usability checkup • Usability testing with kids • In company trainings • Setup of agency briefs • Audience analysis Development services of Dreammachine Kids: • Websites, contest sites, minisites, kids’ corners • Games & contests • Mobile sites, mobile apps • Digital advertising campaigns • Online communities • Augmented reality • Social Media • E-mail marketing • E-commerce, E-coupon or e-voucher actions • Top topicals (back2school, halloween,...) ... Targeting kids, mums and families in an appropriate way Gerda Van Damme is Business Unit Manager of the ‘Dreammachine Kids’ department at Dreammachine. She started her career in the children’s books publishing world. Before working at Dreammachine she was also Consumer Marketing Manager at MSN and Manager of The Web Factory. Her deep knowledge of the online consumer is based upon a large experience with digital and online media since 1995. Guido Janssens is Manager of Dreammachine. As a multimedia expert since 1992, he started his career in the early days of the CD-i at Philips Interactive Media Center. In 1998 he joined The Web Factory, and he has not left the internet sector ever since. 3 4 About the authors
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 3 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Digital Marketing to ‘Generation SpongeBob’ Gerda Van Damme & Guido Janssens (Dreammachine Kids) Whitepaper Update May 2014
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 4
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 5 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Table of contents Introduction 6 The importance of kids marketing 8 ‘Generation Spongebob’ 10 A new generation of mums & dads 22 Digital media consumption 26 Kids & digital marketing 28 Trends in digital kids marketing 36 Usability 78 Legal & ethical considerations 88 References / further reading 96
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 6 Most popular infographic in 2013 “The new kid in town”
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 7 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Introduction Kids marketing: the new kid in town “speaks Digital”. According to a Nielsen study, the spendings in digital marketing to kids for US and UK together topped 1 billion dollar in 2013. The infographic ‘Kids of the past vs internet generation’ (Bhavesh Patel) was the single most viewed infographic on Slideshare over the whole of 2013. Kids marketing is hot, and the kids ‘speak digital’. Generation Z, or ‘Generation Spongebob’ as we call them, are the first generation of internet users who are born at a time when the internet is completely accepted as a mainstream element in our daily lives, with internet access available in the vast majority of households. The greater part of them are raised by the generation (called generation Y) who adopted the internet with a huge enthusiasm 10 to 15 years ago – when they were teens, using already applications like IM on a daily basis. In this respect their mothers are very different than all previous generations of mothers. This paper is mainly based upon desk research and treats the following topics: • The importance of kids marketing • ‘Generation Spongebob’ • A new generation of mums & dads • Digital media consumption • Kids & digital marketing • Trends in digital kids marketing • Usability • Legal & ethical considerations • References / further reading
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 8 The importance of kids marketing Most active and lasting bindings to a brand are established before the age of 16.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 9 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Indirect influence on many adult purchases Kids influence a lot of purchases: • Kids related goods, such as toys or clothing • Kidfluence: Marketing towards kids influences about every buying decision a parent takes. Parents take their kids opinion into account. Dale Wyat (Suzuki Sales and Marketing Director – 2012): “It is typically the whole family that influences the decision for buying a family car.” Some figures about influence of children in purchases (source: ‘Candy-Coated marketing’ – Sheena Horgan – 2012): • Holidays (86%) • Drinks (84%) • Television (80%) • Furniture (78%) • Computers (25%) • Cars (17%) 63% of kids put things in the shopping basket when they go shopping with their parents (mainly: candy, drinks, cereals, cosmetics, fruit, videogames and clothing). And 64% of kids propose to buy things while in the shop (source: OIVO). When using the so called ‘pester power’, kids urge the parents to buy things they’ve seen in ads. Shaping future brand opinions Studies show that an active binding to a brand, that lasts for a longer time, has to be established before the age of 16. As brand awareness starts at about 6, the brand image should be established in this period. Spending power According to Kinder als Zielgruppe der Werbung’ - Julia Lutz, kids use their money mainly to buy sweets, drinks & fastfood… …BUT when asking the kids, they say they want to put money aside: • For buying toys and bikes (<=9 yrs) • For buying mobile phones (>10 yrs) In Belgium the amount of pocket money is growing with the age, from 21 € a month at 10 to 28 € a month at 12. 57% save it at home, and another 30% in a bank account. The younger they are, the more they save the money. They spend their money on food & snacks (40%), clothing (38%), videogames (27% - growing with the age), going out (11%), cosmetics (9%),... (source: OIVO Onderzoeks- en informatiecentrum van de Verbruikersorganisaties, 2011). Indirect influence Influence on purchases of kids- related goods Mainly older tweens have a big influence on the purchase of kids-related goods, or they simply decide themselves what they want. Brands are extremely important in this context amongst the older tweens: the brands a kid uses (clothing, toys, phones) will play an important role if he’s “in” our “out”. Starting from 8 years old, the brands a kid consumes (or wears) are an important factor determining if he/she will be accepted between his peers. Kids even influence the websites their mother visits. (IAB)
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 10 Generation SpongeBob “Kids grow old young.” Ask for our audience analysis service for your project!
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 11 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Who are we talking about? This whitepaper is talking about children from 2 to 13 – the age on which they can officially make their Facebook account. A great part of this age group consists of “tweens”: the children between 8 to 12 years old. They are too big to be a child, too young to be a teen; they are just ‘in between’. This group is a part of the so-called ‘generation Z’. The commonly used definitions and delimitations of the generations are not very precise: • Baby Boomers: born between approximately 1946 (Post-War) and 1964 • Generation X: born between approximately 1965 and 1980 • Millennial Generation (Generation Y, NextGen, the Next Generation): born between approximately 1980 and 2000 (some sources say 1995) • Generation Z: born between 2000 (or 1995 or 2005 according to the source) and now (at Dreammachine Kids we like to ccall them ‘Generation SpongeBob’). • Generation Alpha is said to be coming soon.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 12 Cognitive and emotional development of the preschooler To understand the way preschoolers use the internet, let’s first have a look at their cognitive and emotional development, which will influence their browsing behaviour and their browsing capabilities. • Preschoolers are very curious, but they have a have a short attention span. • Once absorbed in an activity, they like to do the same thing over and over. • When they master something new, they have a huge sense of accomplishment There is a big difference between kids 3-4 years old, and 5 years old. Age 3-4: • They like to laugh and try to tell themselves simple jokes that make no sense. • They are still very egocentric. • They are concrete thinkers concentrating on one feature at a time, they don’t understand the concept of compensation. To explain this, the easiest is to refer to the story you may know of the tall and the wide glass filled with water. Toddlers will always think that the tallest glass has most water, and cannot compensate the lower height with the larger width. • They do categorizing based upon 1 attribute. E.g. for a child an apple may not be recognized as fruit, as you cannot squeeze the juice out. Also they have no ability to see hierarchies yet. This will have an impact on the way they can understand subcategories in a website. • They have no comprehension of time. If you say that their friend will visit in a week, they will ask every day if he’s coming today. • They display very externalized emotions (crying, laughing, fighting,…).
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 13 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Age 5: • Empathy starts to really develop and they start learning socially acceptable behaviour. • Start using and understanding symbols. E.g. ‘I am a witch’ (sitting on a broom, this is enough as a symbol to make the statement acceptable for the child). • Distinction between appearance and reality starts to develop, but they love to ‘pretend’ that their fantasies are real. They still sincerily believe that things can appear and disappear. • They are questioning adults to understand the world. • They still have no strategies for memory. • They have a limited understanding of maps, but difficulties with understanding e.g. that the red line on a map doesn’t mean that the street is red. • They learn from experiences (‘if I do this, this will happen’). They see causality. • In complex tasks they will only focus on the current subtask. • They start to accept a delay in the fulfilment of their desires. E.g. wait for their turn to play with a toy. Kids can identify brands starting from about 5 years old. (http://youtu.be/N4t3-__3MA0).
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 14 Development of the children’s brain Development: 6-8 At 6 to 8 years old the evolution of the imaginative, more visual right hemisphere slows down in favor of the more logic left hemisphere. It moves from a fantasy world into the real world and its preferences follow accordingly. Extending possibilities As this children start reading and writing, they have much more impact and understanding of their surrounding world. The child gets an aversion of everything that could be ‘childish’. They want to be taken seriously. Also the difference between boys and girls gets more and more evident and both sexes have a very clear preference for the ‘right’ toys. Kids grow old young At this age we also that kids start to imitate the adult world, the so called ‘Kids Grow Old Young’ – tendency. Due to its social and emotional development, the child cannot afford to be associated with products or games that might label it as ‘childish’. And of course, this intensifies the boy-girl contrast. In the following years of the child’s development, this trend will get more intense.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 15 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Development: 8-12 From 8 years on, children are getting really savvy consumers. Brands are getting important and brand loyalty starts to develop. Also many other decisions that a child makes at this age will remain unchanged for the rest of its life. But if a brand doesn’t correspond to his values, it will be dropped – probably for the rest of the child’s lifetime. Social influence from peers gets more and more important. The child starts to recognize, consider and question another person’s viewpoint. The child takes the behavior and appreciation of his friends into account. He wants to be ‘cool’ and hip. At 10 their neurological growth increases, and at 12 they enter the early adolescent stage, which will change their way of thinking, their values and their behavior completely. But attention, at this age their attention curve is still much shorter than the curve of an adult. We even see that in the following stages (12-18) their attention curve is still significantly shorter than the one of an adult.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 16 Technological/social context they live in Today’s young people are completely comfortable with the rapid technological evolution. The rate of innovations, as reflected in patent applications, has more than doubled during their lifetime. For this generation, toys conceived as a mix of ‘analog’ and interactive technology are normal. For example: Monopoly Zapped, combining a classical monopoly with extensions on the Ipad. The bank is on the IPad, which also contains extra modules, for example to get you out of jail. Always attached to technology According to the study ‘Zero to Eight’ from the EU Kids Online Network (August 2013), “Over the last five to six years there has been a substantial increase in internet usage by children under nine years old. Children under nine years old enjoy a variety of online activities, including watching videos, playing games, searching for information, doing their homework and socialising within children’s virtual worlds. The range of activities increases with age.” Starting from 8-12 years children start to be continuously connected, using several devices multiple times per day.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 17 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Many values of the previous age group remain important: the safety and love of its caring family. Identity and peer influence Kids are searching for their identity and benchmarking this with the characteristics of their peers. They are searching for the boundaries of what is allowed for them. They look for their role in school and at home, and long for acceptance by friends and family. The influence of their peers is enormous, acceptance of their social neighborhood is essential in every decision they make. But the biggest influencers are the children that are a bit older than themselves (“Kids grow old young”). Values of a new generation
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 18 Self-esteem & success “Fame” has become more inspirational: “Dreams are just a YouTube Video away”: 77% desire fame and believe they will actually achieve it (source: Youth Product and Program Developer’s Handbook – Daniel Acuff – 2013) They seek for independence and expression of their individuality. Therefore they search constantly for new things – brands that do not reinvent themselves are forgotten – and personalization is important! Happiness as their normal state According to ‘The Marketing Store’, Jan 2013, kids of generation z are basically happy kids. Most cited sources of happiness are family, friends, play, and toys. The family is the very most important source of happiness, cited twice as much as the second source, which are the friends. Family and friends first This makes it no surprise to hear that the most desirable values for kids aged 6 to 12 are: being a happy family, having lots of friends and being a nice person. Also being smart and being rich score high. An important learning for any marketeer targeting kids is that those who focus on unhappy, rebellious or frustrated kids in their messaging will have a hard time to connect to the majority of kids and their parents.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 19 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Engaged kids Again according to ‘The Marketing Store’, Jan 2013, at very early age children of generation z are quite engaged towards global issues, society and environment. An example tapping into this: the EL MONSTRUO website from ING Direct and Unicef: a monster that prohibits the children to go to school can be countered by sending an sms with your desired ending of the story. See http://elmonstruo.org/ For each SMS ING gave 1,20 € to Unicef, in total 197.000 €. Boys vs Girls: is the gender gap closing? The difference between boys & girls gets enormous at the tween age: they form separate groups at the schoolyard, they dress differently, and they play with different toys. While there is a lot of debate going on about the gender gap and gender stereotyping in advertising and in toys design, the reality shows that traditional toys are still strongly gendered. Boys and girls play in a different way. Hasbro research shows that boys expect power and control in their play, while girls are endless explorers and identity seekers when playing. According to Viacom research, parents encourage gender neutral play for girls, but not for boys, while the play preferences of the kids... reflect stereotypes.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 20 What products are important to them? • Classical toys like Frisbees, skateboards, building sets,… • Electronic products that imitate the adults world, like cell phones, cameras,… • Videogames (70% male) • Everything they can collect (source: Youth Product and Program Developer’s Handbook – Daniel Acuff – 2013) For classical toys: starting from 6 the use of classical toys shrinks (some time ago, this was still 9 years). Starting from 3, children already start playing (simple) video games. For the older children in this age group, ‘real’ mobile phones, computer games and clothing get more important. Following the ‘kids grow old young’ principle, they get more and more attracted by adult media and brands. When they’re 12, 83% of the US residents owns a mobile phone. In UK, 44% of the 8-11 year old use a tablet PC. The actual spending of this group is different: they spend most of their money to sweets, ice cream, drinks and fast-food, followed by comics and magazines, mobile phones and toys. What are their favourite activities? The global research from The Marketing Store (Jan 2013) concluded that these are the favourite activities of kids aged 6 to 12: 1. Play video/computer game (27%) 2. Watch TV (24%) 3. Explore Internet (21%) 4. Go to movies (15%) 5. Playing outdoors (15%) 6. Riding bikes (15%) 7. Play with toys (14%) 8. Play a sport (14%) 9. Outdoor activities (e.g. hiking) (11%) 10. Reading (11%)
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 21 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be on subgroups and cliques, as well as on the product category (for example backpacks are more commonly black). Design: • Preferences for special effects • Preferences for symbols (hearts, stars…) • Extensive use of sound and animation • Everything has to go on quickly, kids have no patience. Content: • Be concrete, • Use a present day style, • Use both visual and verbal elements. • Especially under 8 verbal information is less important than the visual. • Take care of the mums: the communication has to be attractive for the mums (and dads) also! • Be sure to have an emotional impact According to ‘Candy-Coated marketing’ – Sheena Horgan – 2012, content for kids should be all about: • More sophisticated storylines and content • Scary, dangerous in combination with conflict • Boy/girl relationships and family issues • Humor (the tweens start to understand more complex humor like sarcasm and allusive remarks). Mainly 6+ males love shocking and taboo, scatological and disgusting content. More specifically about the storylines: • Older tweens get interested in past and future, but more in the future. • Combination of past & future is very exciting (this is an old trick: see Tintin or Bob & Bobette) • Racecars, vehicles, sports, adventure, pop stars, music, magic (for the younger ones), outer space, monsters, dinos, the beach & the ocean, parties (the older ones), • theme parks, • arcades, • fashion (female) and celebrities. • Pirates always work. • Ideally you have to find a scene and an historical setting that fits the product. What design is interesting for this age group? Color: This depends on the age. At 7 they still prefer primary colors, at 12 they have a preference for a much wider range. It also depends on the gender. however blue is common to both genders. Moreover it depends What content and design works?
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 22 A new generation of mums & dads “Love, hope & fear”
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 23 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Love, hope & fear Fear Parents of this generation have fear that their children are not eating right, not sleeping right & not developing right. They think they are bad parents. Professor Sheila Green (Dublin): “Parent’s anxiety is often irrational. […] This is a ‘risk society’. [….] Parents think they can control all aspects of children’s lives.” Love Authoritarian parenting is disappearing. Parents re-position themselves as their children’s friend. Parents think they do not have enough time for their kids. Pursuit of Happiness Parents have an obsession with academic education. We see that children are put under pressure to learn to read and count earlier and outperform other kids in the group. This parent’s attitude results in: • Children having the power over the free time & many purchases of the family. • Children buying and playing games that are meant for a higher age (50% of 13+ in the UK) with agreement of the parents. • Exponential rise in demand for private schools, tutoring and extra-curricular academic lessons. This makes for example the success of sites like www.brainchild.com. Parents in control According to the Ofcom research ‘Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report, 2013’, the majority of parents use a combination of mediation strategies to help keep their children safe online, and over four in ten parents have parental controls installed. Nine in ten feel that their children are safer as a result. The majority of 5-7s and 8-11s say they spend most of the time using the internet with an adult in the room (85% and 69% respectively). Different generations of mums There are two ways of categorizing mums into ‘generations’: by their own age, or by the age of their kids. We first start with the mums categorized by their own age. Mums have all been a child once. Their perceptions are influenced by key moments of their own youth: Tsjernobil, the fall of the Berlin wall, 9/11,... Babyboomer mums (born before 1965) The want money for value. They often try to imitate the majority of the younger moms. They are certainly the most nostalgic of them all, wanting to recreate childhood memories for their own children, as they are nostalgic about their own childhood.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 24 Another way to categorize mums is through the age of their children. Preschooler mums In general there is a strong distinction between mum at home and working mom. The working mom REALLY has no time. She is vulnerable for pester power. Food is very important to her. Food must be healthy, but the working moms have no time to prepare and so they often eat out. The preschooler mum wants to be contemporary, and she wants to camouflage weight gain (the first years after birth). This is also why she loves physical exercise for herself. For the children the focus is on entertainment & education (this will stay like that in the next years). The internet is used mainly to keep up with peers and to search for information. Elementary schoolchildren’s mums Children are away during daytime, so this mum has no control over what they eat. For this reason dinner at home is important. Children start buying their own sweets & candy. Sports become more part of the family lifestyle. Education and school are central in their life. For this mum, the internet is a lifeline between the child and the mother. It’s also a way of communication to peers for the children. This mum wants to look contemporary & professional, and the kids should look presentable at school. Generation X mums (born 1965 - 1980) In their own youth, they were part of the so- called ‘latch key generation’. Their mothers were the first generation working out, and not many tools were available yet for their mothers to organize the family life on top of this. Some of them want to forget their own unstable childhood. In this group we find many divorced and single mums. Above all they want a stable life for their kids and for themselves, with or without a man. They try to be like a friend with their own mum and with their kids. Not all generation X mums are equal, they cherish their individuality: there are many kind of mums (e.g. yoga mum, eco mum,...). They expect marketing to appeal to their multisensory communication behavior. They are willing to spend money for enriching experiences that will create family memories, like unique or adventurous travel. Generation Y mums: ‘Get on the floor and play.’ (born after 1980) These are the preschooler mums. They usually had a prosperous youth. They want to make the world a better place to live and save the world from the damage done by previous generations. They are more world-centric than family-centric. They move and operate in groups. Their style of parenting is: ‘get on the floor and play’. They embrace an ephemeral lifestyle. When it comes to advertising, they have a strong capacity to filter and select what fits their lifestyle.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 25 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Digital mums The ‘Digital Mums’ Report, from IAB Europe Mediascope series, Feb 2013, demonstrates the importance of digital media for the media, brand and shopping choices of European mums. This report highlights that: • 69% (92 million) European mums access the internet on a weekly basis (EU 65%). • 55% (50.6 million) digital mums media multi-task the internet whilst they are watching TV (EU 48%) • 21% (19.3 million) mums use mobile internet (=EU) and 8% (7.3 million) browse using a tablet (=EU). Top websites visited monthly by Digital Mums The research also confirms earlier researches stating that digital mums habits vary accordingly to the age of their children.
Mums who use the internet and have babies and very young children (0-4 years old), are far more likely to visit family and kids websites and personal care sites, whereas women with children aged 16-18 take time out to focus on movie websites and clothing & fashion websites. Media Multi-Tasking 77% access the internet between 5.30pm-9pm, typically after the kids are in bed, enjoying their ‘me- time’ or tackling tasks they didn’t get done during the more busy day-time. 55% use the internet whilst watching TV (EU 48%).
Mums have grasped and managed digital media and technology to underpin their multi- tasking lifestyle. Keeping in touch
 Mums are also using the internet to be social. Instant messaging is used by 53% of digital mums at least once a month (26% daily) and the number of digital mums who have ever made a telephone calls via the internet is 63%. • They regularly access social networking sites – 72% weekly (EU 59%) and 58% daily (EU 44%), • 30% upload photos/videos weekly (EU 24%) and 7% daily (EU 6%) • 22% enjoy contributing to online ratings and reviews weekly (EU 17%) and 11% daily (EU 6%) • 21% get involved in blogging weekly (EU 20%) and 8% daily (EU 8%) All are evidence of digital mums’ desire for personalisation and participation. Online shopping
 Digital mums are even more frequent online shoppers than the average European Internet user (IAB Mediascope). How to reach the digital mum Most research about how to reach digital mums has been done in the US, a.o. by targeted media such as ‘CafeMom’. According to Punchtab (2013), the best way to influence mums, are social media: • 91% of them use social media. Mainly Facebook, but also other channels (Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram) are rising quickly. • Over 50% relies on recommendations of other moms on social media. Recommandations work 2x better than ads. 91% of the moms don’t like brands to post on their Facebook wall. • 81% of the moms say that they will buy more if rewarded by a loyalty program of the brand or the parent company that owns the brand. • If offered rewards, 81% of all moms are willing to interact with brands socially.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 26 Digital media consumption In 2013 the main device for visiting the web at 5-15 is still the PC/laptop.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 27 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Some statistics (source: ‘Children & Parents: media use and attitudes report’, UK, 2013) How much? • The 5-7 group spends 6,7 hours/week on internet (13,9 hours TV) • The 8-11 group spends 9,2 hours on internet (15,2 hours TV) • Starting from 12 the internet usage is much higher (12-15: 17 hours/week, TV 16,6) What do they do? Starting from 6, kids start doing everything that adults do on the web: • searching information (homework!). Google is for the Flemish children the 2nd source of information (DS, 16/10/2013) • playing games • contacting friends and family (mail, chat, social networking) • listening music and watching videos • shopping (!) • reading on-line magazines Their old offline toys from when they were 5 or 6 are for a big part replaced by online activity. They visit sites with games and communities, often related to their traditional toys or movies. That way there is a real boost of communities for 6+, mostly owned by brands, aimed at emotional involvement by the children: • Mattel: Barbie • Disney: Club Penguin • Kellogg’s Kids Club • National Geographic • Everloop, Woozworld How do they visit the web? Kids’ online activities occur at home and very frequently ‘out of sight’. From 5 years on they start using mobile devices to go on the internet unattended. • Use of computers in bedrooms 5-7 without adult: 11% • Use of computers in bedrooms 8-11 without adult: 24% • Use of computers 5- 7 attended by adult: 85% • Use of computers 8-11 attended by adult: 69% In 2013 in UK the main device for visiting the web is still the PC/laptop. The importance of tablets to visit the web is rising quickly within 8-11. For 11+, mobile phones get more important. “One in five UK parents of 5-7 year old feel their child knows more about the internet than they do.”
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 28 Kids & digital marketing Kids expect digital media to entertain them.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 29 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Kids & marketing What kind of marketing do these children accept and what do they accept from marketing? Until 8-9 years, children interpret the advertising very literally. No difference between the publicity and the ‘real’ product will be accepted (size, color…). Starting from 8-9 years, the child’s vision upon marketing changes: marketing should be entertaining. Slogans should be ‘cool’, image building is important and the message isn’t analyzed in a critical way anymore. Limited ad awareness Ad awareness has several aspects: first of all there is the recognition of a communication as advertising. And secondly there is the question whether the child can interpret the suggestive language of advertising, whether the kid takes the message literally or not. Kids develop ad awareness only over years (and as a ‘final’ step they develop ‘banner blindness’). Children may click on banners by mistake, as they haven’t developed an effective ‘ad avoidance’ yet. Banners are - as opposed to television advertising - mixed with real content. Some internet advertising is ‘disguised’ as a game or a dedicated zone on an adult website, a club or a branded environment. All this makes it difficult for kids to understand where they are entering a ‘commercial’ environment. Studies show that especially the youngest children are often not aware of the commercial intent of advergames. This means that for young kids ‘Advertising should be recognizable as such’ gets a new meaning. Some people would rather love to ban all advertising to kids for this reason. BUT: an advertising-free world doesn’t exist. So some people seek the solution in education of kids about advertising. What do kids themselves think about this? There seems to be an evolution towards a somewhat more positive attitude of chidren towards advertising. E.g. half of internet users aged 12-15 are aware of personalised advertising – and are less likely than in 2012 to think it is a bad thing (UK study 2013). Nielsen did some research about ad awareness, and he came to the conclusion that ad unawareness also creates some usability problems on websites, with young kids leaving the website because they unintendedly click on advertisements which they don’t recognize as such. Five years is the age at which children deveolop the facility for making the advertising/editorial distinction; at 7 to 8 children understand why the advertising is being used; at 8-10: children begin to recognize, consider and question another persons viewpoint.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 30 How to engage First of all: Children at most any age beyond 4 will immediately make a ‘for me’ or ‘not for me’ decision when first perceiving a product or a program. Therefore it is important to communicate to them in the right tone of voice. Some ways of communicating are very successful with children. Here are some guidelines that may help you to make the connection: Set the right tone • Use emotions • Magic. Must be more sophisticated for 8+ audiences. • Exaggeration (for example huge muscles of super heroes) • “Cool” additions. For example, give sunglasses to your hero. Leverage the power of play. Play is timeless Communicating with kids, you should be aware that playing is their favorite activity (in the top 10, according to “The Marketing Store’, playing video games comes in the first place, and further in the list we find ‘playing outdoor games’ and ‘playing with toys’). Play has not been revolutionized by digital media. Play is timeless, and ‘good play’ (recognized as such by the child) will always follow or build upon classical play patterns. Parents feel that the following purposes of play are lacking the most (and here is an opportunity for marketeers!): problem-solving, active/ Lego and Minecraft: both built on the same classical play patterns
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 31 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be physical (outdoor?), learn something, imaginative, collaborative. At the left we see an online campaign for Joyvalle leveraging this. Gaming is often used as a marketing tool. Think of the numerous advergames we see appearing on websites and in the App store. Games guarantee interaction with your brand and a positive and repeated exposure of your brand. (see also p. 33) Think like a child For a child, a stick is a toy. Try to think like a child when talking to children. Test your communication with them, do research (as we are no children). Make sure to adopt the thinking of a child of the right age (att.: a child of 4 is not the same as a child of 4,5!). Create a story Storytelling is key when addressing children. Story telling helps to get your message our there, and it helps even more when you are in an educating role. Don’t count on bells and whistles For kids it’s all about the content, not the bells and the whistles. For instance in the toys arena, ‘watch me’-toys will be rejected. Tear down the walls Adopt a transmedia approach. The content is the fill rouge to their experience with your brand. Kids expect continuity and consistency through all media. Example below: this is the key to success for Lego, who is taking intellectual property across devices and formats, ranging from toys over video games to movies in a very consistent way. Let there be fun Kids have busy lifes nowadays. Humour gives them a break in their busy schedule. Humour has become the kids’ language. Kids appreciate shareable jokes.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 32 Also music gives them a moment of well appreciated entertainment, whether it be peers’ music or music from bands they like. Engage with whom they look up to Kids look up to older kids. In digital marketing it’s a good idea to target kids of 2 to 3 years older than your real audience. They love to imitate the adult world. BUT: younger kids do NOT want to be older.  While they may desire to have some things that older kids have, and to ‘play older”, they are very happy being their age. “Brands should celebrate childhood rather than pushing them to “grow up”.  Give kids the opportunity to stay younger longer by encouraging activities that allow them to be (and act) their age.” (The Marketing Store). You can engage with kids through ‘early adopter- marketing’, but this is a difficult process. Early adopter kids (about 15%) are more connected, and they keep informed by watching TV and through social media. They share with their peers... mostly on the playground. If you want to engage with the, make sure to ‘speak their language’ and to offer them creative content they can share. Empower them, they’re the ‘maker generation’ Kids want to be empowered. Many of them are
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 33 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be used to empowering games, such as Toontastic (allowing them to create movies) and Scratch (allowing them to code games). They are ‘the maker generation’. Characters are their best friends It is important to study very well the character before starting: • He/she has to care for /educate the child (or the other way around: f.e. dolls) • The child has to be able to identify himself or exactly take a distance of the role (Joker of Batman) • The child has to be able to look up to the character (for example super heroes) • The character has to be entertaining • The character has to be based on a known archetype (hero, mother, troll, prince,…) Up to 6 years old, children prefer basic and safe animals as main characters. From then on they prefer more “exotic” ones. Gradually their interest shifts towards ‘human’ characters. Dinos are interesting for each age, but mainly for boys. Be aware of your real audience • Who buys? Parents? Grandparents? The child itself? • Who will play with it, use it and participate? • Get a very clear picture of the child: age –gender – and the other data that you would need for an ‘adult’ action Adapting the tone of voice • Keep in mind their psychological and cerebral evolution • Keep in mind their values • Keep in mind what products and design they like • Their attention curve is still very short, so the messages (and mainly the call to action) should be very clear and compact. Some ways to reach out to kids Games Kids are not simply looking for information (except maybe the older ones when making their homework). They want to be entertained. Therefore games are extremely important. Why games? They guarantee: • Interaction with your brand • Give fun & a positive exposure in relation to your brand • Repetition of this exposure (by trying to get to a
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 34 higher level) • They capture the youngsters attention for a long time (longer than on ‘normal’ websites) • The participant must leave some of his data (with their parents consent), so you can follow him up afterwards • Children identify themselves with the main character, which may be a brand embassador • Children may collect loads of (branded) things How to address the child in a game? • put the participant in the centre • reward him as often as you can • let him start with (and win) an easy level and climb up to more difficult ones • let him compete with his peers Sidenote: what starts as a one media brand, ends up as a complete lifestyle brand, throughout all the media. E.g. a game on the Lego website is a ‘real’ Lego product and at the same time a promotion for the Lego pack. The same brand, the same toy, the same game exists in various media, and the child can engage with the brand in a consistent way through all those media. Social Media Following 2013 UK research, the interest in social networking sites with kids is diminishing in favor of instant messaging. While the total number of profiles is declining, the number of social networks is increasing. 18% of the 8-12 years should have at least one profile. Kids social media There are many social networks for children. Nickelodeon, Disney,… Most of them also offer advertising possibilities. Their growth has been enormous since 2007. Already in 2011 the number of subscribed kids, tweens and teens nearly reached 250 million. In general, parents think that dedicated social networks have a positive impact on their child. Teachers disagree. Figures from 2008 (source: ‘Candy-Coated marketing’ – Sheena Horgan – 2012) say: • SN could help reading and writing skills: 76% parents, 29% teachers • SN could help self-expression: 75% parents, 28% teachers • SN could help students learn to work together: 72% parents, 36% teachers On these sites, the communication towards parents is as important as the communication towards the children. • Parents have to approve the registration of their child • Parents want to be reassured about the safety of the platform. In many cases they have a parental panel in which they can activate/deactivate various functionalities (e.g. chat). • Parents are reassured that they will have ‘peace of mind’ (sic - Everloop) while the kids have a place of their own. • Parents are invited to subscribe themselves to newsletters. Adult social media Starting from about 9 years old, many children start using Facebook (that officially only allows kids starting from 13). They exaggerate their age in order to be allowed.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 35 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be • In the EU 17% of the 9-16 years old exaggerate their age on internet. • Kids-oriented groups on Facebook have an enormous success: Spongebob 44 Mio Fans, Silly Bands (animal shaped rubber wrist bands): 1,7 mio fans (October 2013). In 2012 the following percentages of 8-12 participated in ‘adult’ social media in the US +UK: • Facebook: 46% • Twitter: 15% • Myspace: 14% • Google+: 11% • “I don’t belong to any”: 37% In 2011 36% of their parents are aware of it. And they trust their kids on social media although they control them (8-12 US+UK): • I trust my child to be responsible when using social networking sites: 90% • Social networking sites are a good way for my child to connect with friends: 96% • Social networking sites pose a danger to my child: 71% • I need to supervise my child when he/she uses social networks: 82% (source: ‘Children & Parents: media use and attitudes report’, UK, 2013) Getting data Getting children’s data is important for later marketing use. FEDNA (European Code of Practice for the Use of Personal Data in Direct Marketing) guidelines impose to ask for children only the really necessary information. Many social media for kids ask 2x data, so that afterwards they have 2 ways to reach the child: • By asking ‘minimal’ data of the child itself (name, e-mail, age, gender) • By asking the data to the parents, when they have to give their permission to the child to subscribe itself to the social media. Here you can ask all the information you want, and their account is linked to the child’s account. More about the restrictions can be found in the chapter about legal and ethical considerations.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 36 Trends in digital kids marketing The digital life of the kids is as such a major trend of this decade.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 37 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Introduction to the trends Kids are the trend The trend of trends is really the new attention that is paid to kids, by organizations, government institutions and companies. Kids are more than before considered as little consumers, with their own right to fashion, their own electronic devices, their own tv stations, etc. Think of – just to name a few – Stella McCartney and Lord Willy’s (‘the ridiculously posh gentlemen’s clothing line based in New York City’) starting a clothing line for kids (‘Little Willy’s’). Little Willy’s, exclusive clothing line for boys, from the posh gentlemen’s suit company, Lord Willy.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 38 The digital revolution Digital kids are the trend Ban digital advertising! Ban digital! Revolutionizing brands The content Storytelling Humor please! Video is king Characters and Santa Claus Boys & girls Real is beautiful Mini rules Happiness and well-being Sophistication The interaction Co-creation Starification Points, degrees, badges A vocal generation Helpful brands The second screen Advergames as goodies Social media The ephemeral social Protected social networks The rising power of Twitter the trends
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 39 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Everything connected The cross-channel approach mmersive experiences The mobile kid The internet of things Digital at the point of sales Augmented reality The wired kid Virtual reality Code-mania Wearables Digital mums Nothing less than perfection Educate kids and sell to parents Inform the parents Celebrating heroic mums Imperfect mums Nostalgic mums The inclusive experience The business perspective Big data Growth hacking Crowdsourcing Struggling with business models Opportunities for innovation
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 40
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 41 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be the digital revolution Digital kids are the trend Ban digital advertising! Ban digital! Revolutionizing brands
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 42 Ban digital advertising! While parents, educators and governments are getting more aware of the possible undesirability of some types of digital advertising to kids (fearing obesity, pester power, ad unawareness, a.o.), the industry has understood the appeal of advertising- free environments for kids. • On the one hand there are many devices appearing, offering advertising free content through walled garden. • On the other hand we see ad-blocking devices, such as the AdTrap hardware device, appearing and similar solutions offered by software packages, such as the Disconnect App. Digital kids are the trend With most successful toys having moved into the digital arena, kids are living a digital lifestyle that goes a lot further than being a lot on digital devices as we are used to think of them: smarktphones, tablets, computers... There is an explosion of digital objects, and the kids’ space is one of the most important areas where the so called ‘internet of things’ becomes a reality. For kids it’s a totally normal and a prerequisit that their toys are interconnected (e.g. Furby doll with the Furby app), artificially intelligent (e.g. the electronic Tangram from Tangible Play) and allowing social interaction (e.g. Minecraft allowing to connect to play together through their multiplayer servers). Creative companies go further in their kids’ communication than just delivering digital content through web or app interfaces. They see opportunities to connect in the real world, and grasp those to truly interact with the kids in a way that appeals to them. Below an exmple of YES-bank in the Kidzania theme park in Mumbai: they installed ATM-like interfaces, allowing kids to learn about banking in a realistic setting.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 43 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Revolutionizing brands To survive in this revolution, brands are rejuvenating and digitizing their brand at all costs. In some cases, even if this has to happen at the expense of the carefully built core brand characteristics. We see the same tendency to be open to complete brand ‘resets’ with adult products. An example of this is Moet Chandon producing Champaign in India. An extreme example of such a move in the toys industry is Lionel Trains. Below you see an old advertisement of this company, and the new image of the brand as reflected in their game app. Old New Digital is bad! Another topic worrying many parents, is the discussion about the negative effects for children spending too much time behind screens. Digital media consumption is under moral pressure, and brands are leveraging these feelings by offering non-digital, ‘real life’ entertainment activities for parents to do with their children. The Canadian traditional toy company Kol Kid took this as the theme of their campaign with the series of ‘The Joy of Simple Play’-commercials (picture below). The Joy of Simple Play - campaign from Kol Kid In the same philosophy we see that ‘real life aids’ are starting to learn kids, ‘alienated from real life skills’ by their digital addiction, how to behave in society. An example of this is the below ‘Beep & Boop’ app from the creators of JibJab. The ‘Beep & Boop’ app learning kids to behave well in real life.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 44
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 45 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be the content Storytelling Humor please! Video is king Characters and Santa Claus Boys & girls Real is beautiful Mini rules Happiness and well-being Sophistication
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 46 Humor please! Kids anno 2014 have busy lifestyles. Too busy, with all those levels to achieve, Minecraft monsters to chase, and tv shows not to miss... Humor takes away their stress. Using humor in digital advertising will make it more effective and impactful, as it will immediately trigger sympathy for your brand. An example: the viral ad ‘The Camp Gyno’ stars a precocious tween who gets her first period at summer camp, appoints herself ‘Camp Gyno’ and proceeds to educate her peers about the bloody passage to womanhood. Our tween’s reign as Camp Gyno is finally foiled when her friends realise they can get their monthly supplies via a delivery service rather than a tyrannical 12-year-old. HelloFlo: ‘It’s like Santa for your vagina.’ HelloFlo: “I was just a big loser... Then things changed. I got my period.” Storytelling Content marketing to kids is all about storytelling, and preferably this storytelling happens in video format. With fun and educational videos, Rokenbok Toys was able to create entertaining in-store demos of their toys virtually. Today, the majority of their online sales come from YouTube channel viewers who make up more than half of their customer base. Rokenbok Toys employees create videos in a small studio they set up for this in their offices. For Lego, a brand with intrinsic storytelling power, fans of the brand from all over the world are taking this to a next level, creating stories, of which the best ones are hosted on an official Lego YouTube channel. Sometimes brands create an online ‘series’ (often with famous actors) to promote their products. An example: Playstation Vita with their ‘Family Dupont’ soap, casting several ‘BVs’, a.o. Axel Dhaeseleire.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 47 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Characters and Santa Claus The ‘old fashioned’ traditional ‘characters’ such as Santa Claus, Sinterklaas, ... are still doing their annual good job. An interesting case is the ‘NORAD tracks Santa’ one. Here’s the story: back in 1955 a Sears ad, inviting to call Santa Claus, had a typo, and calls arrived at a top-secret military crisis number of the NORAD. They answered the calls pretending to be Santa Claus, and a new tradition was born. This is now an annual online event, with 70,000 calls being answered and many videos being posted. The 2013 edition of ‘NORAD tracks Santa’, sponsored that year by Internet Explorer Besides the ‘good old’ characters, the characters from movies/tv shows (e.g. SpongeBob Squarepants) and games (e.g. Angry Birds) are now the fuel of a lot of kids-targeting marketing campaigns. Characters are kids’ best friends. Business models are built on the exploitation of popular licenced IP. Video is king Kids LOVE video. Watching video, whether it be on television (24%), in the cinema (15%), on YouTube or on brand websites is together with gaming (27%) their favorite activity. Brands offering quality video will easily get the kid’s sympathy. There is a downside to this: the terms & conditions of YouTube... don’t allow kids on the site, and YouTube won’t allow you to set kids under 13 as your demographic targeting option. Kids love short format video. AwesomenessTV, broadcasting users’ short format videos on their popular YouTube channel also licenses its content— to Nickelodeon and other websites, Netflix and international platforms. But officially, kids are not allowed on that channel either, and they have an explicit age gate. The Walt Disney company bought viral video production company Maker Studios. Disney may excel at producing big-budget blockbusters, but Maker Studios is producing what kids and teens increasingly want: short-form videos they can watch on their cellphones. Disney released their new series ‘Sherrif Callie’s Wild West’ (picture below) for tablet first, months before releasing it on television.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 48 Real is beautiful Nickolay Lamm caused a stir in the toy industry with his comparitive mockups of Barbie-like dolls and dolls with real life proportions. When he decided to start a production of such a ‘natural-looking’ doll, called Lammily, he got 500% of his required funding through KickStarters in a minimum of time. Boys & girls Gender stereotyping is back! While this is being critized, and legislators are looking into this, it has never been so explicit over the last 4 decades as now. Here an ad showing a Lego girl in 1981, and the same girl now with a toy of a film crew, but at the inside there is a makeup table. This is the same catalogue for Sweden and Norway, as legislation is different in those countries. At the left the Swedish version, showing a boy with a hairbrush. Goldie Blox: construction toys, explicitly marketed to girls.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 49 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Happiness and well-being As Ozoda Muninova wrote in The Guardian, “There is an increased focus on personal well-being. In 2014 we will see more brands differentiating themselves from competition through influencing how people feel.” Happiness for children is associated with the family (and friends in the second place). Here an example from Fisher Price, the ‘Moments of Joy’ website section. Another example is the ‘Toy feliz’ (pronounced ‘Estoy Feliz’ which means ‘I’m happy’) campaign from Mattel, addressing the Latin community in the US. Mini rules One of the major reasons that Lego could turn the tide, moving from being at the brink of bankruptcy, to being the global number 2 toy manufacturer, is the big bet they made to focus on mini-figurines and build a whole eco-system around it, including games and movies. Pinypon mini-figurines Virtual minifigurines from Webkinz
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 50 Sophistication Exposed to the internet and global culture, children’s tastes are more sophisticated than ever. So when designing products for and marketing to them, you also too need to be sophisticated. Especially the digital world has changed dramatically over the last decade, and you’d better take that into account if you want to communicate with kids. Kids expect sophistication on all levels when dealing with brands online: • Graphic design • Contentwise, through complexity of experiences. E.g. Minecraft, with very ‘rough’ design structures, but offering endless and ‘open’ play possibilities We see the same in the ‘traditional’ world. Where previous generations were happy to watch nature by going to the pond and watching frogs growing, we now offer the kids prehistoric pets to raise (‘triopses’).
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 51 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be the interaction Co-creation Starification Points, degrees, badges A vocal generation Helpful brands The second screen Advergames as goodies
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 52 Starification Digital media are - due to their interactive nature - very apt to ‘starify’ kids. This can be done in several ways. Here some examples: Proud mums love to ‘show off’ with pictures and videos of their kids. Photo contests organized by brands are mainstream marketing activities. Kids can be integrated in a passive way into the marketing materials of a brand, creating a customized experience, and making a star of the children. Below an example of Persil doing this: Children can be implicated in an active way within a campaign. An example from Studio 100: the band ‘K3’ asked kids to play along with their new song and post the video on YouTube. The best one(s) would then be integrated in their new tv- commercial. Co-creation Kids love to be part of a project from a brand they admire, and to have an impact on it. After all they are ‘the maker generation’. Below an example of ‘co-created’ marketing to kids: the ‘castle of imagination’-contest from Disneyland. Kids have designed a castle through an international competition. The best designs are combined into a real castle that will be built in Paris as a ‘popup castle’. ‘The Castle of Imagination’ from Disneyland Paris. An other result of this longing to have an impact on favorite brands is what we would call ‘DYI- marketing’: fans helping to build the brand by creating their own campaigns, without the brand interfering in this. Below an example from Kinder eggs and the so-called ‘unboxing’ videos, showing fans while they are discovering what’s in the eggs.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 53 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Points, degrees, badges It originally came from the gaming world, then made a detour by social media (‘Cool’-app, Foursquare badges,...). And now they’re also there to stay in kids marketing: kids just love points, degrees and rewarding badges. An example: the Geopalz device with app counts the steps the children make. This gives them points, which parents can use for instance to allow extra screen time to the child. A vocal generation The 2014 kids and mums are both vocal generations. An example: the Gatorade campaign ‘Water is the enemy of performance’ triggered a storm of protest on social networks..
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 54 The second screen The so-called second screen is getting mainstream for kids, especially the older ones, for whom manipulating/watching several screens at a time is a very ‘standard’ activity. They typically will watch Youtube tutorials for their construction set, while they are chatting with friends on their smartphone, and they keep the tablet nearby for when they want a small break from their construction activity. A nice case of second screen application in the cinema environment: Disney has introduced special interactive screenings where kids are invited to download the entertainment giant’s Second Screen Live app on their iPads and use it to access games and additional content. This was exclusively available at select cinemas for a limited time. Disney says that ‘the App gives friends and family a chance to play games, sing along with songs, find hidden treasure and compete with other audience members for great prizes’. Helpful brands Customers now expect brands to be helping them in their daily life, also through their marketing campaigns and through the digital media they create for their audience. 3 examples targeting mums and kids: A flu-tracker from SoftSoap. With Audi’s ‘Toy service campaign’ Audi technicians repeared 500 cars for their most important customers: the kids. A Nutribén app to help kids eat and mum to share pictures of the eating kid.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 55 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Advergames as goodies In 2010, 80 percent of websites for foods that were promoted on children’s TV networks included advergames (Culp, Bell, & Cassady). An advergame usually involves a user playing with branded items (e.g., using Life Savers or Oreo cookies as gaming pieces) or playing in a heavily branded environment (e.g., a virtual arcade that contains company logos or product images). Now that parents have got used to pay for game apps, advergames have become interesting for brands to give as goodies, as they have a perceived value. In this example from Nestlé you get extra levels on the website with an on pack code. The game is a customized edition of Angry Birds, and some of the levels are freely accessible. Below is an example of advergames at an ‘open’ website (accessible without code), from McDonald’s (Happy Meal):
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 56
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 57 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be social media The ephemeral social Protected social networks The rising power of Twitter
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 58 Protected social networks Brands were setting up their own social media or massive multiplayer online games, but that is a hard thing to do and to keep in practice. Or brands buy existing social networks. The biggest example: Club Penguin, bought by Disney: Club Penguin has no advertising, however some competitors do. An example of a protected virtual world and social network for kids with advertising is Woozworld. It lets advertisers create an interactive and dynamic environment, allowing them to connect with tweens by capturing user attention and facilitating direct communication, interaction and engagement. Below is an example of HarperCollins integration in Woozworld: The ephemeral social 2014 will probably see a further decline of Facebook with the youngest audiences. Kids are on Facebook and love it, but early adopters start to say that ‘Facebook is so eighties’ (sic). And teens are leaving the network behind. The change to the Facebook algorithms to define how much free content can be shown to fans will not help. Probably brands will start communicating less to young teens through Facebook in 2014. Snapchat, the social network where your photo posts only last for 6 minutes, is very popular with tweens and teens. Mainly in the States (which accounts for about 80% of their users), but their penetration is growing fast everywhere. The ephemeral character is very attractive to them. And of course, just like it’s the case with Facebook, a lot of the users are under the official age limit of the service. Snapchat introduced a new feature on its most recent iOS version: SnapKidz, a special mode for children under 13. But it doesn’t allow to send or receive pictures, and it is not successful with kids. Below the Litago Snap’n play campaign, allowing to snap moments of real life, play games with it and share.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 59 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be The rising power of Twitter While Facebook is losing preference, Twitter is remaining stable and Instagram is growing fast with adolescents and young parents. A campaign that worked really well with mums on Twitter was the one from Carambar in France. Carambar is a candy which has a joke on each of its wrapping papers. They made a false announcement (corrected by them after 5 days) that the jokes were about to be replaced with school exercices. The message was retweeted 55,000 times in 5 days, and the campaign got 950 mentions in press. Sales went up with 10%, without spending any media dollar. Another example is from Penguin Books: they had Peter Rabbit hack their Twitter account for a few days. Petter Rabbit asked the audience to help him search for his lost jacket. Finally actress and Peter Rabbit author Emma Thompson made an appeal through social media to Peter Rabbit to get of the account, which he ultimately did. Result: free PR.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 60
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 61 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be everything connected The cross-channel approach Immersive experiences The mobile kid The internet of things Digital at the point of sales Augmented reality The wired kid Virtual reality Code-mania Wearables
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 62 The cross-channel approach We already said it in the chapter ‘how to engage with kids’: Kids are tearing down themselves the walls between channels and media, and they expect you to do the same. Successful brands adopt a transmedia approach. The content is the fill rouge to their experience with your brand. Kids expect continuity and consistency through all media. In the end it all comes down to that, within a quickly evolving digital world. Brands no longer create isolated projects in silos, but become part of the digital eco-system of the child. Also offline and online get connectioned. Immersive experiences Brands have growing possibilities to offer immersive experiences. McDonalds’s happy table is a good example of this trend being put into practice by a brand: McDonald’s McParty Run app turns the smartphone into a car, and users can select one of the chain’s classic mascots to be their driver. There are several different games to choose from, all of which have themes based upon the restaurant’s popular menu. The Furby eco-system
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 63 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Mobile is hot Mobile apps with games are an obvious form of mobile advertising to kids. We now even see commercial game apps appearing targeting preschoolers. Below you see an app created by Dreammachine Kids for the preschooler shoes- brand Woeffies. However, we see a lot moving in the publishing and streaming spaces on mobile, so the landscape for mobile advertising will probably change a lot in the coming year. Big game changer will be the arrival of Netflix in Belgium (foreseen for the end of 2014). Important to know is that Netflix does not have advertising (or at least not in the kids part), and that probably kids will spend a lot of their ‘mobile screen time’ on the ‘Just for Kids’ part of this app. The internet of things Business Intelligence forecasts the number of IoT enabled objects to go from just under 1.85bn in 2013 to over 2.5bn in 2014 and 9bn in 2018 when they will account for half of all internet enabled devices. One of the spaces in which this is changing fast is the connected car. Below: picture of Mercedez entertainment options For kids this means that the car basically becomes a digital experience. For advertisers, this evolution means that you really don’t know where, in what way and in what context your content will be consumed, especially if this content is of a mobile nature. See also: Wearables.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 64 Augmented reality Augmented reality exists since many years, but analysts expect the technology to really take off in 2014. Below 3 examples: Kellogg’s Choco Krispis transforming the box into a gaming device through augmented reality. Lego in-store augmented reality. In selected Lego stores clients can watch the content of the boxes in a kind or augmented reality - mirror. App from the German ministry of health, stimulating kids to brush their teeth long enough, offering an augmented reality experience while brushing. Digital at the point of sales Retailers are welcoming creative digital POS tactics into their stores. 2 interesting cases: The Macy’s Believe campaign is about the power of letters and the magic of the holidays. When kids and parents came to mail their letters to Santa at Macy’s, they could bring the characters from the new holiday classic “Yes, Virginia” to life. By downloading the Macy’s Believe-o-Magic app and pointing the camera at special markers at Macy’s stores, kids could pose for holiday photos with their favorite characters through the magic of augmented reality. Another example is the Makie Dolls popup stand at Selfridges end of last year, where people could create their Makie Dolls through a 3D printing configurator app. Selffridges is known to be always ahead with new technologies in their store.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 65 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be The wired kid The Geopalz device and app counts the steps of kids in order to give them points, that can be cashed a.o. with Amazon. They also have other commercial partnerships: e.g. It shuts down or opens the Minecraft server for the kid at request of the parent (if configured like that, and according to the number of steps taken). The Huggies Tweet Pee notifies the mum when there is a need to consume a new ‘Huggies’. Virtual reality The Oculus VR glasses, showcased in New York at the ‘Digital Kids’ conference, and bought by Facebook, are expected to speed up the breakthrough for Virtual Reality applications. Expectations are high that VR will become an important technology to reach kids soon. We don’t know of any Oculus-projects yet targeting children, but the commercial possibilities are certainly there: Nissan is partnering with Oculus to reach Digital natives. To introduce Nissan IDx they partnered with 3D VR pioneers Oculus and created an immersive, virtual world of co-creation that people could literally step into and explore.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 66 Wearables Besides Google Glasses for kids, there are similar (cheaper) glasses from toy manufacturers. We don’t know of marketing to kids on those devices, but we expect this to happen in the years to come. Below a child ‘Googling’ Barbie pictures on her Google Glasses. The smartphone shows what the girl is seeing on her glasses. Code-mania Only a few years ago we were surprised to see children of the ‘maker generation’ coding their own games in Scratch. Now this is taken further, with devices and apps learning preschoolers how to code. Some examples below: Primo coding set for small children Play-i coding device for small children
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 67 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be digital mums Nothing less than perfection Educate kids and sell to parents Inform the parents Celebrating heroic mums Imperfect mums Nostalgic mums The inclusive experience
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 68 Nothing less than perfection Digital products are helping parents to get closer to a perceived perfection in parenting. The below ‘Teddy the Guardian’ product sends medical data about the child to an app, as soon as it’s being hugged. Although it was originally aimed at hospitals, the makers are surprised to find out that this product is quite successful with perfection seeking parents. The ‘Teddy the Guardian’ website and app. Inform the parents Parents have a need for relevant, organized, timely and accessible informations. They want to know where their kids are (see above), they want brands to help them organize the chaos of informations, they want websites to offer them lists of only relevant and well ordered contents. This trend comes with a real ‘listmania’. Two examples: The Playrific app, embedded on the Tabeo device, collects a great number of apps under one umbrella. This brings order in the chaos for parents, and it guarantees better app visibility and lower production costs for brands. Above an example of the Seaworld app within the Playrific environment. The Spring in’t veld - website, offering more clarity to parents in the cultural offering for kids.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 69 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Educate the kids and sell to the parents Nowaday mums are perfectionists when it comes to their motherhood. This is especially true when it comes to the education of kids. Combine this with the fact that screen time is felt as an issue: educational content will give parents a perfect excuse to allow their children to use digital media. Companies are leveraging this feeling by offering sponsored quality content and educational apps for kids. Two examples: Cadbury educational app Danone Russia: The product in question was not perceived as healthy, so they packaged communication with educational value. Edutainment keeping the parents in control about what skills the kids should develop. Celebrating heroic mums Mums in 2014 expect from marketers to acknowledge their multiple roles as a mother, a business woman, an artist, and so on. Brands are showing their respect and pay a tribute to mums, sometimes almost giving them ‘divine’ proportions. Procter & Gamble went down this road with their texting app ‘Tap to thank’ (see below). I facilitated sending text messages to moms from smartphones, looking into the address directory for all common spellings and variants of the word ‘mom’. Procter & Gamble, ‘proud sponsor of mums’ campaign (sponsorship of Olympic Games). This much awarded campaign collected 18 mio views. P&G: “We are using our voice to celebrate and reward mums and recognise the sacrifices that all mums make to help their children to grow and succeed. This campaign is about real people and we have featured employees and our agency partners who are mums with their kids in our adverts.”
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 70 Imperfect mums We see a totally different mum depicted in some recent commercials. We see mums that are explicitely no heroes, no saints, no sacrificing perfect beings. For instance in this successful campaign from Hyundai: a 4 minutes viral video, making fun of the “corny” image of the caring and “perfect” mum, starring actress Anna Crilly. ... or in this Halfords Easter Getaway commercial, where mum puts a crocodile in the house to get the family out and in the car. The mum in the below video from Renault outsmarts her tatoed daughter with an even bigger tatoe under the motto ‘The times have changed’. Nostalgic mums With nowadays mums, nostalgia is a strong feeling that marketers tap into. Mums search for experiences that will create family memories, and they look for ways to eternalize and share those memories. Some examples: Kellogg’s Rice Crispies campaign, creating shareable ‘branded’ moments. Kellogg’s asked moms to share those “Moments That Snap, Crackle and Pop” with them on Facebook, by uploading a photo of her child enjoying Rice Krispies for breakfast. In 11 weeks page Likes increased from 24,000 to 302,000, and over 900 million total brand impressions were generated. Nesquik published the ‘Quicky Mix’ app to help mums to edit and publish family movies. With this app “It’s as easy as making Nesquik. Just choose your theme, your film clips and your soundtrack, then stir them together! Family movies have never been so easy.”
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 71 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be The inclusive experience Brands tap into the frustration of nowaday parents that they don’t spend enough quality time with their children, by offering them inclusive experiences, where they do things together, while being engaged with the brand. Rice Krispies (Kellogg’s) holiday site Oetker recipes for birthday parties
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 72
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 73 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be the business perspective Big data Growth hacking Crowdsourcing Struggling with business models
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 74 Growth hacking JibJab is a publisher of apps for kids & families. They build all their successes upon previous ones, and make sure that all their products are tied to each other. They pull you in with very funny little videos (virally spread through their systems). As soon as you start engaging with their website, you quickly create heads for your family members. Those ‘heads’ become like characters in the whole eco-system, living throughout all of their products, and keeping the whole family engaged. They also use a lot of ‘embedded virality’ combined with upsell possibilities at the right spots. Thanks to this intelligent approach the products are promoting themselves efficiently. Growth hacking through ‘embedded virality’ by JibJab. Big data Big data can be used to optimize conversion and the sales funnel, but it can also make the experience better. That’s what Disneyland is doing very well with it’s MagicBand. The MagicBands are linked to a credit card and function as a park entry pass as well as a room key. They are part of the new MyMagic+ system and joining is still completely voluntarily. However, visitors who join will have many advantages such as jumping the queues, pre- booking rides, changing reservation on-the-go via smartphones, being personally addressed with their name by the Disney characters, and much more. Although they are collecting massive amounts of data, Walt Disney does respect the privacy of their visitors. They allow visitors to completely control how much and what sort of data is collected, stored and shared with whom or to op-out completely. Netflix uses big data, doing A-B testing on testgroups of 50,000 users, to constantly optimize the interface giving access to their video offering.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 75 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Struggling with business models Brands are struggling with their business models in the digital space for kids. There is a lot of pressure to offer free or very cheap services and apps. On the other hand, advertising is not appreciated on kids’ media. Another model is the one of licencing and merchandising. Case: Rovio is no longer charging for its suite of insanely popular Angry Birds mobile games, opting instead for the pay-as-you-go, freemium model. And according to a report published today in the Wall Street Journal, the move is part of company’s chief executive Mikael Hed’s master plan to make Rovio the Walt Disney of the future. Crowdsourcing An older example, but you still see this a lot: Dreammachine created this crowdsourcing campaign for Atoma and MSN to pick best notebook cover designs through an online contest. Through the campaign they got to know for what activities people use the notebooks (recipe-book, diary,...) and what the brand means to them. Then they used those informations in their next campaign. And of course they only produced the chosen designs.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 76
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 77 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be opportunities for innovation Opportunities for innovation The combination of the cloud, with social aspects, sensors, bluetooth, mobility and geolocation are offering opportunities for innovation. This is the space where the toy industry as well as kids marketers are experimenting. Expect more to come from this area. 2020 outlook: nostalgia for the traditional?
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 78 Usability “I don’t see where I can go on this website.” Contact Dreammachine Kids for a usability analysis of your existing or future digital project.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 79 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Introduction Excellent usability for kids is a key driver of satisfaction and thus of success for your marketing actions. Bad usability can form not only an obstacle to a pleasant experience or even to get your message through, it can also ruin your carefully built brand image for a long time. Often kids websites or apps are constructed using the good old ‘Fingerspitzengefühl’ as a guiding principle for usability. Typical clichés are that ‘funny typo’ (often unreadible), vivid colors (often not well contrasted), moving objects (difficult to catch with the mouse when they are used for navigation) and ever-changing interfaces (confusing) should work well for the young. These are dangerous assumptions, that - as research has shown - should be avoided. Microsoft, Lego, Sony and similar multinationals have budgets to perform large scale laboratory testing with young users. However, not every budget allows dedicated usability testing. Understanding and respecting the below ground rules should help your project to be more successful. But let’s start with a view on the development stages of the child again (see also above ‘Generation Spongebob: kids grow old young’), this time from a specific usability perspective. The stages of development Piaget has been criticized a lot, but his classification of the development stages is still very useful to acquire a good understanding of certain usability issues: The 4 stages Piaget defines the following usability stages: • Sensorimotor stage (0-2 years) • Preoperational stage (2-6 years) • Concrete operational stage (7-12 years) • Formal operational stage (12 years and older) The sensorimotor stage (0-2 years) Development of body level functions (touch, feel, taste) and memory. Starting from 8 to 12 months children realize that objects that they don’t see keep on existing. As to their physical development at this age we see an important evolution of the motirics – the fine motorics will only follow afterwards.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 80 The preoperational stage (2-6 years) We begin to see fine motorics skills. Language develops further at a fast pace at this age – but they still understand everything literally. Self-consciousness develops, and with this comes an egocentric attitude. These children are animists, still believing for instance that a computer has a kind of soul. Memory develops and the kids learn by imitating and playing. Senses are well developed, but for the child it is difficult to order and organize his impressions. He also has difficulties for searching things. They cannot really ‘scan’ an environment while searching. Also they only perceive one characteristic of an object at a time. They concentrate on one single aspect of a task. They have no understanding of hierarchies. Their reaction time is still 3x longer than the one of an adult and their concentration span is mostly limited to 8 to 15 minutes. The concrete operational stage (7-12 years) We now see the development of: • the ability to compare lengths and quantities; • the ability to concentrate on more than 1 aspect at the time; • the ability to order, count and calculate. • They are able to understand hierarchies and reverse actions. Their concentration becomes selective, adapted and planned. They start to be able to solve problems. They keep on learning by playing and imitating, but also planned studying starts and is required from them more and more in their school environment. Figurative thinking becomes possible and they start to appreciate someone else’s perspective. Their reaction time is gradually enhancing, to get comparable to the speed of an adult by the age of 12. As to the physical development we see an important evolution of the fine motorics, mainly the hand. The formal operational stage (12 years and older) Only from 12 years on we see the development of: • Abstract & deductive reasoning. They are able to consider many aspects together; • Spatial thinking; • Analyzing options & drawing logical conclusions. “Is the computer happy when I click here?” a typical 4 year old
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 81 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Their visual acuity (the ability to distinguish details in objects) is full grown now. Only now children start being able to do those mouse movements which demand a precise coordination between the eyes and the hand. How does all this apply to usability? Johanna Heléne Gelderblom has made a very interesting recap with guidelines about how you should design for developmental appropriateness for 5 to 8 year old children. She did this in her comprehensive dissertation ‘Designing technology for young children: Guidelines grounded in a literature investigation on child development and children’s technology’. Below you see a (very small) sample from this very comprehensive framework: This is a good example of how usability guidelines can and should be grounded in the developmental stage of the audience. Piaget about learning Piaget had a constructivist view on learning: he thought that learning occurs through a process of adaptation to the kid’s environment, through assimilation, accomodation and equilibration. How does this apply to usability? The more a website or game resembles other websites or games a child has already seen, the more it will be easy for thim (her) to understand the interface and to use it. Motivation and emotion are a second trigger for learning. Excerpt from ‘Designing technology for young children: Guidelines grounded in a literature investigation on child development and children’s technology’, Johanna Heléne Gelderblom, 2008.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 82 Kids are NOT technically savvy It’s a common misunderstanding: modern kids are supposed to be tech savvy, and what’s more, many parents think that their (even very young!) kids are more tech savvy than they are themselves. This assumption is not taking into account two important givens: • the development of the child’s brain, general intellectual and motoric skills, and • the experience with computers, mouses, devices, apps and websites, which for the youngest by definition is short. Of course it is already a certainty that Generation Z will be an extremely tech-savvy generation as they grow up. Some ‘rules’ This is a very incomplete list of rules for child-centric design. For usability it’s important to be aware of the fact that ‘the devil is in the details’. Any ‘quick recap’ gives a distorted view by definition. What we want to make clear with this chapter is that child- centric design is all about a mindset: don’t rely on your own assumptions and if possible test your product with children, in an appropriate way. What follows here is an actionable recap, mainly based upon the research report from Nielsen Norman Group. Make it easy to find your website Children love to return to your website if they once had a good experience with it, and will want to There is a lot of literature about this. A small and very selective overview: • Designing technology for Young Children: Guidelines Grounded in a Literature Investigation on Child Development and Children’s Technology - by J.H. Gelderblom. June 2008. • Janine Liebal | Markus Exner, Usability für Kids. Ein Handbuch zur ergonomischen Gestaltung von Software und Websites für Kinder. • Nielsen Norman Group Report: Usability of Websites for Children: Design Guidelines for Targeting Users Aged 3–12 Years. Third Edition. • Several articles by A. Dix (some of them together with L. Uden). • Several publications by Juan Pablo Hourcade.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 83 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be find it back on their own. Include common typos in search engine keywords and if possible your set of urls. Try to keep your url short. Structure Kids, even more than adults, are looking for structure and an understanding of where they are in the website, while navigating. A consistent user interface and clear recognizable buttons referring ‘back home’ are key. Make it clear what are the main website categories, and always keep it clear in which site section they are. Avoid to have ambiguous navigational items. An example: if you lead a child to a game page, don’t put a promo to another game in the sidebar saying ‘Play’, as the child will think it will start the game it came for. For kids that can read well (around 9), do not split articles in many small pages. Rather design for scrolling. Avoid popup windows. Easy navigation Make it easy to navigate, and adapt the navigational items to the age of your audience. For prereaders vocal instructions are key, although they will quickly recognize written words like ‘Play’ and ‘OK’. But don’t rely only on those vocal instructions for the navigation, as many children will navigate without sound, as they are on old equipment or not to disturb the others in the room. Use standard interaction schemes and follow existent web conventions, and make sure all pages on a site have a consistent look and feel. Avoid too many different navigation schemes (2 is a maximum). Always provide a clear way for the kid to ‘get out of a situation’ (e.g. to quit a game or close a movie or animation). Show all menu options by default. See also: ‘Icons’ (next page). About text and readability Use simple, relatively large fonts, and avoid ‘fun’ typos that are hard to read. Provide good color contrast between the text and the background, which should be solid. Do not animate texts. Some general guidelines of readible typography also apply for the young: left-align your text and do not put it in upper-case. Adapt your texts to your audience’s reading skills. Imagery Imagery should be relevant to kids. Illustrate content with informative pictures. Use familiar real-life imagery in interactive images, and match the meaning of the image clearly with the expected behaviour of a button. Animation and video Kids love animation, but too much of it can confuse or overwhelm them. Make it clear if an animation is not interactive, as they might try to click on it otherwise. Allow skipping animated content and avoid automatic repeating. And important: never animate the background, especially when there is text on it. Sound Roughly the same goes for audio as for animation: make it engaging, not overwhelming, allow them to skip it, and when it’s in the background, don’t put it too loud. Audio on interaction, such as funny rollover sounds, are highly appreciated by kids.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 84 Advertising and in-site promotion Distinguish advertisements from content. Create a visual context for promotions and banners. Avoid confusion with your page content by having interaction buttons in promos, such as ‘Play now’. Make it clear for kids when they are leaving the website, and allow them to return to it. Instant gratification Kids are impatient and expect content to appear directly when they have decided to click to it. This has huge consequences on the design of your site or app, and it’s not only about loading times, although this is important. Show clear progress of loading content on a loading bar, but don’t confuse them showing interim interactive content while other content is loading. Use e.g. a simple linear animation or show instructions instead. Do not ask children to choose between ‘How to play’ and ‘Play’, as they will always chose to play the game, but make instructions part of the game or game introduction. E.g. you may disclose instructions one by one while they are already playing. A common source of frustration are errors. Decrease the number of errors and error messages, and use terms that young users understand in your error messages. Automatically detect the presence or absence of plug-ins. Tell users which games or features require a plug-in. Provide alternative content for users lacking necessary plug-ins. Tailored content The homepage Kids are not very patient, so make sure to create immediate success with your young audience. Every feature on your homepage should be of high quality and well functioning. Present the breadth of the website’s content on the homepage, to achieve a true initial impression of what the site has to offer. Make sure that it is clear which content parts are for which audience, e.g. what is for boys or girls, or what’s for the youngest and what’s for the elder ones. This can be done explicitly. The content Kids want tailored content. Match your website content to your audience’s interests, and make this content fresh and stimulating their curiosity. Distinguish and isolate content for adults. State clearly to users if they are transiting to an adult section. You can use characters to guide kids through your content. Using hot spots Menus Younger children have difficulties to understand hierarchy. So submenus should not be hidden behind a higher hierarchical level of navigation. In general for children, best is to have menus visible and with consistent placement at all times. Kids do use the browser buttons, such as the back- button, so make sure it works properly (which is not the case with sites entirely built in Flash).
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 85 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Make it look clickable Make clickable items look clickable and pushable, and if you’re not on a touch device, ad visual rollovers to images that can be clicked. Also if your clickable items are images, they should be easily recognizable as hot spots and well separated from the background. They should be easy to distinguish from each other. They should be sized to be easy clickable. Icons Icons should represent actions or objects in a way that children can easily recognize them. Use metaphors that children understand. Provide clear, real life illustrations, relevant for the landing page, on buttons and promos. Use them consistently throughout your website or app. Pointing devices Use big boxed buttons to compensate poor mouse control. In the above illustration we see an image of cursor movements when targetting buttons with the mouse (dragging), at different ages. Adapt the cursor and button size for the youngest, as they still have difficulties pointing and clicking on the right spot. Complexity in mouse-interaction should be avoided (right-mouse click, double clicking, moving targets, dragging). Best is to enable the right mouse button with the same functionality as the left mouse button for the youngest, as they use them randomly (up to 4-5 years old). Make sure that, if you change the cursor shape, the active part of the cursor sits where the children expect it, and test this. Direct manipulation With direct manipulation of objects on the screen, childen need quick feedback (e.g. auditive reaction to the manipulation). The actions should be reversible. For complex manipulations, the actions should be made incremental, to ease the process for the child. Mobile hot spots The touch screen As far as we know, little publicly available research by adult participants by 5 year old participants by 4 year old participants All paths taken to click on a 32 pixel target at a distance of 256 pixels, according to research from Juan Pablo Hourcade:
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 86 has been done with childeren about the usability issues arising from touch-interaction. Some key differences that may impact usability positively for children are: • Low precision for pointing compared to pointing with a mouse • No accelerated movements • Higher fun-level • Only one control (cfr. left mouse click), versus 3 controls when using the mouse (left, right, scroll) • Greater ease of learning • No need for a visible pointer (cursor) However, we also identify some potentially negatively impacting factors: • Multitouch aspects (using several points at the same time to interact) • Lack of hover state • The hand obscures part of the screen when pointing • There are predefined buttons on and around the screen, which may interfere with the website or app-interaction, and which may not be well known to the child (not designed with children in mind). Navigation visibility Never hide navigation on digital products targeting children. Don’t hide a website navigation which has important functionality because of a too complex hierarchy. Simplify and show it. Don’t hide the so called ‘chrome’ (the navigational interface) in a mobile app behind a ‘menu’ button. The usage of arrows Kids apps or websites often have stories, using arrows to go back and forth between pages. Research has shown that those arrows are most appreciated when the left and right arrows are well spaced from each other. When they are on a tablet, such arrows are most effective at the bottom of the screen (and again: spaced from each other, in the bottom left and right corners of the screen). Games Games are a typical format for kids’ websites or apps. Games come with their own specific usability problems. Here’s a small list of issues that your audience may encounter when using your game (summary from ‘Identifying usability and fun problems in a computer game during first use and after some practice’ - W. Barendregt, M.M. Bekker, D.G. Bouwhuis, E. Baauw, 2006): • Knowledge problems: the design of the program is unclear about the right commands, function keys, or rules. • Thought problems: the product makes users develop inadequate goals and plans, or take wrong decisions in the assignment of plans and subplans, e.g. because all navigation buttons look the same. • Memory problems: the user forgets a certain part
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 87 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be of the plan and does not complete it, although the goals and plans were originally correctly specified. • Judgement problems: the user cannot understand or interpret the game feedback after an action. • Habit problems: the user performs a correct action in a wrong situation. • Omission problems: the user does not complete a well-known subplan, e.g. because he/she is more focused on the next step. • Recognition problems: well-known feedback is not noticed or confused with other feedback. • Sensorimotor problems: e.g. accidentally clicking the wrong button because it is too small or too close to other buttons • Knowledge inefficiency occurs when the user follows an inefficient path because he or she does not know a better way and the product has not made this clear. • Habbit inefficiency implies that the user uses routines although he or she knows that there are more efficient ways. • Fun problems. Examples of fun problems: • Challenge problems: the provided challenge in a sub(game) is either too high or too low. A good ground rule is that games are most of the time too difficult. • Fantasy problems: the user is not pleased with the provided fantasy and specifically says so. • Curiosity problems: the user has to play a subgame for too long before being able to reach a (sub)goal, get a reward, or move on to a new part of the game. • Control problems: the game takes over control, and the user cannot regain control even though he or she wants to. Often the budget does not allow to create ‘the perfect game’ and choices have to be made about which ‘bugs’ to fix. In that case, the severity of the impact should be estimated, taking into account the learning curve of the user throughout the entire process of playing and replaying the game. Usability testing Usability testing is the best way to make sure that your website or app will deliver the results that you hope for. First of all: this is not an easy task, and providers who will assist you with this will be hard to find. Kids are difficult to recruit, and should be different kids for each new project (to avoid biasing the results). Also, you will need the parents’ permission. Another problem is the capacity of kids to tell what they are really thinking. To resolve this children are often asked to think aloud and are being filmed during this process. Some tactics that are used for usability testing with kids are the following: • Card sorting for site structuring • Task resolution • Testing aided and unaided interaction • Evaluating user journeys and content Some environments in which usability can be tested with kids: • In the presence of their parents. • In the presence of a friend (in duos) • In the familiar situation of the home, with a parent reporting to the researchers. It’s important to perform the testing in a child- friendly environment, and to take away stress factors from the environment as much as possible. Usability testing with children is often conducted with pairs of friends.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 88 Legal & ethical considerations “A magazine is an iPad that doesn’t work”, Alice, 1 year
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 89 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Some of the main worries about (digital) marketing to kids are a.o.: • Is a kid savvy enough to understand publicity? • What about publicity for less healthy products (snacks, drinks)? • What about the time spent on electronic media? Shouldn’t a child play in the yard with other children? Should a one year old use digital media? • Violent games: • It has been proven that excessive involvement in these games contributes to more aggressive dispositions and behaviors • It has been proven that they trigger the secretion of cortisol in the brain, which on a long term provokes reduced cognitive performance, blood sugar imbalances, decrease in bone density, higher blood pressure, lower immunity and increased abdominal fat • What about unadapted content for kids, for example explicit music videos on YouTube? Several propositions exist to give a rating to on- line videos, but this system still does not exist. • Concerns about the privacy of the kids. • Gender stereotyping ‘Compensation marketing’ We see that many brands try to counterbalance the negative impact of the on-line consumption by inciting the kids to do sports, to eat healthy products, and so on. Brands can tap into the parent’s fears and hopes, and bring parents and children together via outdoor activities, techfree toys and other kinds of unplugged experiences. Ethical considerations One year old children now ‘swipe’ and ‘touch’ instead of clicking, even on magazines: http://youtu. be/aXV-yaFmQNk Gender stereotyping: Mattel producing Barbie on Mars and Lego producing female scientist is world news. Download our presentation about this topic on dreammachine.be/ knowledge
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 90 Download our presentation about this topic on dreammachine.be/ knowledge General legal considerations We first will go over a number of legal requirements that apply to all sectors. What ages do these legal considerations apply to? A relevant concept here is: ‘At what age is a child legally supposed to reach a certain level of judgement?’ The Privacy Commission says: 12-14 years, while the Internet Observatory, the French and Flemish Audiovisual Decree say: 12 years. Legally speaking, below 12 years.: parental consent is needed for certain marketing activities, such as collecting data of the child. From 12-18 a certain degree of autonomy is supposed to be present. Important is to determine your audience and be consistent about this. Do not mix adults and minors online. Age verification may be necessary to do this: • put age requirements (e.g. present pop-up, text in the terms & conditions of the website) • Control the age (eg. ask birth year, use cookies) Disclaimer This is a Belgian document from Spring 2014, other rules may apply in other countries or in the future. This list is not exhaustive, it should in no way been taken as a legal advice, nor as an exact formulation or perfect interpretation of specific applicable laws. This document is based upon the informations received from Altius Lawyers, Gerrit Vandendriessche. However, the contents have been summarized by Dreammachine and may have been altered during this process. Also, by the time you read this some informations may be flagrantly wrong due to changes in legislation. For all advice, please consult a lawyer. Dreammachine will not be held liable for any damage occured by applying this document. For the literal text from Altius Lawyers we refer to the Powerpoint presentation on the above mentioned link.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 91 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be The context determines the targeted age. This context may be the presented products or services (e.g. toys), the presentation (e.g. usage of vivid colours, big fonts, easy language,...), the contents and environment (e.g. the presence of games, pictures of minors,...). Data protection There is no separate set of rules for processing data of minors, the general data processing obligations apply. Consent Below 12-14 years also the parental consent is needed. Consent for Direct Marketing purposes is not allowed. Information The reality is still far from the ideal situation, with 21% of Belgian websites not having a privacy statement at all in 2013. Yet, the consent should be an ‘informed consent’: this means that information about the consent should obligatory be given, prior to the processing, through a privacy statement. This information should be adapted to minors, in the local language, simple and short, without legal terms that children wouldn’t understand. It should be given in a direct and personal style. Use “You” or “I” instead of “the user”. It should incite to inform the parents (ideally including where relevant an information page for the parents, involving them). The layered approach is certainly a best practice. Not all data can be processed: • Only necessary data can be processed and no facultative fields are allowed when addressing children. Do not collect data that you do notstrictly need. • No data about his “neighbourhood” can be asked, such as data about hobbies, friends, family, etc. • No sensitive data, regardless of age The texts should incite the minor not to: • Give directly identifiable data (use pseudonym) • Disclose any directly identifiable data about himself After the datacollection no use can be made of them for other purposes than the purpose(s) mentioned. No transfer to third parties is allowed unless if this was mentioned at the time of collection. How can data be used for DM purposes? According to the Privacy Commission’s interpretation of the law, under 12-14 years no Direct Marketing activity is allowed, and above 12- 14 years it is subject to parental consent. For e-mail/sms the opt-in rule applies (unless if there is a client relationship: then opt-out is applicable). The optin-checkbox may not pre- ticked. Opt-in/opt-out should always be acquired on the spot / at the moment of data collection. For telemarketing the “do not call me again”-list should be respected. For paper and telephone the opt-out rule applies, which means that as long as one has not opted out, communications may be sent. Data collection and mobile apps 54% of Belgian apps did not have privacy statement in 2013. However, app developers, app stores and third parties are subject to data protection rules: there should be a readable and accessible privacy policy and prior (granular) consent should be given when collecting data. Data collection and mobile apps for children In the WP 29 advice from 02/2013: the most
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 92 restrictive data protection approach has been chosen: • Data minimization • Purpose limitation • Age specific information • No behavorial advertising (directly or indirectly) • No data collection through children about family/ friends The following obligations for data collection apply for both adults and minors: • Registration with privacy commission • Agreement with data processor • Sufficient security and organisational measures • Transfer of data outside the EEA Cookies Cookie consent requirements are roughly the same for adults and minors. An important difference is that, where adults need to give consent for the usage of cookies for analytics or third party advertising purposes, such consent cannot be given by minors under 12. Image rights When using pictures of minors, prior (parental) consent is required: this should be a separate and specific consent, and information about the nature of the usage should be given (informed consent). Publication of a picture on the web does not imply an automatic consent to any further use. General advertising laws The general advertising laws also apply to children and digital communications. But the vulnerable nature of children brings specific guidelines along that should be followed, in order to respect these general advertising laws. No misleading market practices First of all, a definition: misleading advertising deceives or is likely to deceive the average child, even if the information is factually correct, and causes or is likely to cause the child to take a transactional decision that he would not have taken otherwise. Also misleading is late, ambiguous or no information at all. Hyperbolic advertising is allowed but difficult to interpret for children. How to assess if a communication to children is misleading? This is done through a case by case assessment, taking into account the age (not minority/majority) of the child, the perspective of the average child. Children are supposed to be vulnerable, and from this point of view the communications will be assessed taking into account the age, the type of the product advertised and the type of ad technique that is used. Just like for adults, certain types of communications are always considered misleading, such as claiming a non existing endorsement, falsely creating urgency to solicit an immediate decision, advertorials without notice, commercial communication that is not clearly identifiable as such or whose author is not clearly identifiable. No aggressive market practices Aggressive advertising is defined as harassment, coercion, physical force, or undue influence that significantly impairs or is likely to significantly impair the average child’s freedom of choice and that causes or is likely to cause the child to take a transactional decision that he would not have taken otherwise. How to assess if a communication to children is agressive? This is again done through a case by case assessment, taking into account the timing, location, nature, persistence or circumstance that
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 93 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be impairs the child’s judgement. And again, children are supposed to be vulnerable when making this assessment. Always agressive are considered: • Directly inciting children to purchase advertised products or to convince their parents to purchase the advertised products; • Creating the false impression that the child has won or will win a prize when there is no prize, or claiming the prize incurs a cost. Social media Social media personal data that are publicly available on the www are subject to the data protection rules. Your company is a controller that processes personal data of social media users. Policies from social media networks also have their own, often more restrictive rules, that should be respected if you are using their services. Often these rules include a prohibition to use the services under 13 (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube). According to the terms & conditions of Facebook “If you collect information from users, you will obtain their consent, make it clear you (and not Facebook) are the one collecting their information, and post a privacy policy explaining what information you collect and how you will use it.” Twitter explicits that “You will not send or otherwise post unauthorized commercial communications”. Sector specific laws Sexual services Are expressly prohibited, • ads regarding sexual services implying minors • ads destined to minors implying sexual services • ads showing to children indecent images that stimulate their fantasy Toll numbers and mobile short codes No targeting of minors below 12 years may be done. However, targeting 12+ minors is allowed if: • Product/service mainly relevant for minors • One can reasonably expect that minor can pay product/service himself Content not suitable to minors must refer to age requirement and cannot be announced publicly. This implies extensive formal information requirements. TV/radio advertising Are not allowed to minors: • No alcohol • No ads for toys ressembling to fire weapons • No ads possibly affecting the physical, mental and moral development of minors (eg porn and excessive violence) • Not present, make insignificant, glorify, tolerate or encourage violence • Not show or encourage illegal, antisocial or reprehensible activities • Not undermine the authority of parents or teachers • Not abuse the trust minors have in their parents/ teachers • Not exploit the lack of experience or naivety • Not show minors in a way that their physical or moral integrity is being put in danger
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 94 Sector-specific codes of conduct Before entering in online communications with children, important is to check whether specific codes of conduct apply to your sector. Here is a non-exhaustive list of existing codes of conduct: International: • OECD (1999), “Online Advertising and Marketing Directed Toward Children”, OECD Digital Economy Papers, No. 46 • Advertising and Marketing Communication Practice Consolidated ICC Code 2011 • World Federation of Advertisers • Confederation of Food and Drink Industries (CIAA) • Union of European Beverages Associations (UNESDA) National (Belgian - see website JEP for the texts of the codes): • Raad voor Verbruik, “Aanbevelingen inzake reclame voor kinderfeesten“, 2000 • “Arnoldus Convenant” (alcohol) • Fevia-code (food) • Febelfincode (financial services) • Febiac code (cars) • Code voor ethische en verantwoorde reclame voor ondernemingen die loterijspelen organiseren • BDMA code • Not create fear and discomfort with children • No ads resulting in physical, moral or intellectual damages • Not incite minors to disobeye the traffic rules • Not say that having a product X is an advantage on other children • Not say that not having a product X is a disavantage on other children • Not say that children not having product X are not cool, less valuable or popular • Not minimalize the price of a product • Not say that the prize of product X can be afforded by any family • Not incite minors to take food of which excessive use is not recommended (fat, transfat, sugar, salt, natrium) • No telesales Tobacco: no ads for tobacco Alcohol in radio/tv ads • Not directed to minors, no minors using alcohol • No link between alcohol and driving • No link between alcohol and physical performance, social/sexual success • No suggestion that alcohol would have relaxing, stimulating, stress- reducing or therapeutical effect • Not inciting to excessive drinking • Not presenting negatively reasonable or no alcohol use, not presenting high alcohol use as positive quality Medicine • No advertising for medecine through sms, e-mail, contests • in “magazines” for children (incl. websites) • No ads for non-prescriptive medecine when exclusively or mainly destined at children • Additional formal requirements apply, eg: “dit is een geneesmiddel, geen langdurig gebruik zonder geneeskundig advies”
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 95 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be The current partners of the EU Pledge An example: the European Pledge of the Food Industry The EU Pledge is a voluntary initiative by leading food and beverage companies to change the way they advertise to children. This is a response from industry leaders to calls made by the EU institutions for the food industry to use commercial communications to support parents in making the right diet and lifestyle choices for their children. EU Pledge membership consists of three main commitments: • No advertising of products to children under 12 years, except for products which fulfill specific nutrition criteria based on accepted scientific evidence and/or applicable national and international dietary guidelines. For the purpose of this initiative, “advertising to children under 12 years” means advertising to media audiences with a minimum of 35% of children under 12 years. This rule will be applicable as of 1 January 2012 throughout the EU. • In the online sphere, the above commitment will apply to marketing communications for food and beverage products on company-owned websites, in addition to third-party internet advertising. • No communication related to products in primary schools, except where specifically requested by, or agreed with, the school administration for educational purposes. Countries may have their own ‘partner list’ in place. E.g. in Belgium there is the ‘Belgian Pledge’: a Pledge signed by certain industry partners, saying that they comply with the EU Pledge specifially at Belgian level.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 96 References/ further reading* * Un update of the ‘further reading’ section will be available soon.
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 97 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be About the cognitive and emotional development of kids Designing for children 101. Shelley-Ann J. West, 2009. Piaget, J., & de Saussure, R. (1956). Le problème des stades en psychologie de l’enfant: symposium de l’Association de psychologie scientifique de langue française Paris: Presses universitaires de France. Weaving a Library Web. A Guido to Designing Children’s websites. Helene Blowers. Robin Bryan. ©2004 by the American Library Association. Youth Product and Program Developer’s Handbook – Daniel Acuff – 2013 About the digital media consumption of kids Common Sense Media, Zero to Eight, Children’s Media Use in America 2013. Digital Childhood: Electronic Media and Technology Use Among Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers. Elizabeth A. Vandewater, PhD - Victoria J. Rideout, MA - Ellen A. Wartell PhD - Xuan Huang, MA - June H. Lee, PhD - Mi-suk Shim, PhD. in PEDIATRICS Vol. 119 No. 5 May 2007. Handbook of Children and the Media - Dorothy G. Singer Kids & Media / Design Analysis. Spring 2006. Bernard, King, McGaw, Paradis, Tallacksen. Montgommery, K. C. (2001). Digital kids: The new on-line children’s consumer culture. In D. G. Singer & J. L. Singer (Eds.), Handbook of Children and the Media (pp. 663-650). Thousand Oaks: Sage. Ofcom, Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report (2013). Seiter, E. (2004), ‘The Internet Playground’, in J. Goldstein, D, Buckingham andG, Brougére (eds), Toys, Games, and Media , Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 93-108. Valkenburg, P. M. (2001). Beeldschermkinderen: theorieën over kind en media . Walrave, M., Lenaerts, S. & De Moor, S. (2008) Tieners, ouders en ICT: overzicht resultaten survey. UA: MIOS, 74p. Want to Market to Kids Via Social Networks? Good Luck With That - Mashable, 15-12-2011 About usability for kids websites Being Playful – learning from children. Alan Dix Designing technology for Young Children: Guidelines Grounded in a Literature Investigation on Child Development and Children’s Technology - by J.H. Gelderblom. June 2008. Designing User Experiences for Children. By Heather Nam. Published: May 17, 2010 on www. uxmatters.com Drag-and-drop versus point-and-click mouse interaction styles for children. by Kori M. Inkpen. Editor Jonathan Grudin (One Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA) - Publisher ACM New York, NY, USA Interaction Design and Children. Foundation and Trends® in Human-Computer Interaction, vol 1, no4, pp 277-392, 2007. By Juan Pablo Hourcade. Nielsen Norman Group Report: Usability of Websites for Children: Design Guidelines for Targeting Users Aged 3–12 Years. Third Edition. Ten Design Lessons from the Literature on Child Development and Children’s Use of Technology. Heléne Gelderblom and Paula Kotzé. June, 2008. IDC 2009 Papers.
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 98 Uden, L.,Dix, A., Iconic Interfaces for Kids on the Internet. In: (eds.): Proceedings of IFIP WorldComputer Congress, August 2000. Beijing, 2000, 279-286. About kids marketing Azzarone, S. (2003). Teens, Tweens and Technology: What’s important now? Advertising and Marketing to Children, 5 (1), 57-61. Born to Buy: The Commercialised Child and the New Consumer Culture - Juliet Schor Constantin, Corina, and Dan M. Grigorovici (2004), “Experiencing Interactive Advertising Beyond Rich Media: Impacts of Ad Type and Presence on Brand Effectiveness in 3D Gaming Immersive Virtual Environments,” Journal of Interactive Advertising, 4 (3) (http://jiad.org/vol5/no1/grigorovici/index.html ). Furnham, A. (Ed.). (2000). Children and Advertising . London: Socials affair unit. John, D. R. (1999). Consumer Socialization of Children: A Retrospective Look At Twenty Five Years of Research. Journal of Consumer Research, 26 (december), 31. Julia Lutz - Kinder als Zielgruppe der Werbung McNeal, J. & Yeh, C. (1993, June). Born to Shop. American Demographics, pp 34-39. Neeley, S. M. (2007). Internet Advertising and Children. In D. W. Shuman & E. Nelson, Michelle R. (2002), “Recall of Brand Placements in Computer/Video Games,” Journal of Advertising Research, 42 (2), 80–92. Malinckrodt, V., & Mizerski, D. (2007). The Effects of Playing an Advergame on Young Children’s Perceptions, Preferences, And Requests. Journal of Advertising,2007 (summer), 87-100. Qrius - Leefwereld van kinderen - Euroforum congres Trends in kidsmarketing Efteling, 22 mei 2007 M.A.N. (2005). Young Canadians in a Wired World Phase II Key Findings. Ontario, Canada: Media Awareness Network. Mangleburg, T., & Bristol, F. (1998). Socialization and Adolescents’ Skepticism Toward Advertising. Journal of Advertising, 27 (3), 11-22. Robertson, T. S., & Rossiter, J. R. (1974). Children and Commercial Persuasion: an attribution theory analysis. Journal of Consumer Research, 1 (1), 13-20. Schneider, Lars-Peter (2005), “Cashing in on Crashes via Brand Placement in Computer Games: The Effects of Experience and Flow,” International Journal of Advertising, 24 (3), 321–343. Sheena Horgan - Candy-Coated marketing – 2012 The Kids Market: Myths & Realities - James U. McNeal What Kids Buy and Why: The Psychology of Marketing to Kids - Daniel Acuff Young, B. M. (1987). Television Advertising and Children. Oxford: Clarendon: Press. About ad awareness Bever, T., Smith, M., Bengen, T., & Johnson, T. (1975). Young Viewers’ Troubling Response to TV Ads. Harvard Business Review, 53 (november/ december), 109-120. Condry, J., Bence, P., & Scheibe, C. (1988).
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 99 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be Children’s Understanding of the Intent of Advertising: A meta-analysis. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, 16 (2), 205-216. Macklin. (1983). Do Children Understand TV Ads? Journal of Advertising Research, 23 , 63-70. Macklin. (1985). Do Young Children Understand the Selling Intent of Commercials? Journal of Consumer Affairs, 19 (2), 293-304. Martin, M. C. (1997). Children’s Understanding of the Intent of Advertising: A meta-analysis. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, 16 (2), 205-216. Rozendaal, E., Buijzen, M., & Valkenburg, P. (2010) Comparing Children’s and Adults’ Cognitive Advertising Competences in the Netherlands, Journal of Children and Media , 4: 1, 77 — 89 About the legal framework and the ethical considerations A Guide To Child Safety Online - Raising Kids on the Internet - Aldric Chang. Alliance for Childhood. (2000). Fools Gold: A critical look at computers in our childhood. College Park, MD: Alliance for Childhood. Austin, J., & Reed, M. L. (1999). Targeting children online: Internet advertising ethics issues. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 16 (6), 590-602. Buizen, M., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2003). The effects of television advertising on materialism, parent–child conflict, and unhappiness: A review of research Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 24 (4), 437-456. Children And the Internet: Great Expectations, Challenging Realities - Sonia Millwood Livingstone Observatorium van de Rechten op het Internet, e-Marketing & Minderjarigen. Food and beverage advertising to children. When is a child a child? - World Federation of Advertisers. July 2007. Generation Digital: Politics, Commerce, and Childhood in the Age of the Internet - Kathryn C. Montgomery Hood, D. (2000). Is advertising to kids wrong? Marketers respond. Kidscreen, November 15 http://chd.sagepub.com/content/ early/2011/08/11/0907568211406456 Social networking sites and contact risks among Flemish youth http://www.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/ EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx http://digitalads.org/ Exposing how marketers target youth Je kind op het internet. Erno Mijland. Kids Online: Opportunities and Risks For Children - Sonia M. Livingstone Linn, S. (2004). Consuming Kids: The hostile takeover of childhood. New York: Free Press, pp. 41-60 Livingstone, Sonia (2004), “A Commentary on the Research Evidence Regarding the Effects of Food Promotion on Children,” in Childhood Obesity—Food Advertising in Context, Office of Communications, ed., London: London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Media and Communications. Resources — Commercialism & Children - http:// www.mediaed.org/wp/commchildren-resources
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 100 Walrave, M. (2006) Major users, minor rights: e-privacy rights of minors Communicação & cultura - 2(2006), p. 157-169 Walrave, M., & Heirman, W. (2010). Disclosing or protecting? Teenagers, social networking sites and privacy. Antwerpen: MIOS. About the digital mums Digital mom - A two-part report published by Razorfi sh and Cafémom. Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation Is Changing Your World - Don Tapscott Iab-Mediascope - Digital first for Europe’s mums/ Marketing to Moms: Make Sure to Send Her An Email. On Whymomsrule.com, A Marketer’s Guide to Understanding America’s Number One Consumer Group, Moms. By David Bohan. Marketing to Moms: Moms, Twitter and Your Brand. On Whymomsrule.com, A Marketer’s Guide to Understanding America’s Number One Consumer Group, Moms. By David Bohan. Marketing to the New Super Consumer Mom & Kid - Tim Coffey Mom WOM. New Insights into Word of Mouth Conversations Among Mothers of Young Children. - April 23, 2008. Keller Fay Group. © BabyCenter LLC. Moms Who Blog: A Marketing Powerhouse - By Debra Aho Williamson. October 2010. Punchtab, Scoring points with mom Punchtab, The mommy profiles Trillion-dollars Moms: Marketing To A New Generation Of Mothers - Maria T. Bailey Understanding the modern mom. Oct 2009, David Stutts, Luckie. Unicast - What Women Want From the Web Report - Summer 2010 WhyMomsRule.com Poll: Insights on Moms’ “Me Time”. On Whymomsrule.com, A Marketer’s Guide to Understanding America’s Number One Consumer Group, Moms. By David Bohan. WhyMoms Rule.com 2010 Generations Survey - David Bohan. Cases http://www.elchupete.com/es/portada International festival for kids communications Trendwatching.com, trend ‘minisumers’, http://trendwatchingpremium.com/trend/ minisumers/?track=tribeslives (behind password - subscriber only)
  • Digital Marketing to Kids 101 © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.be
  • © Dreammachine Kids 2014 Rue Auguste Frison 56 · 6040 Jumet (Charleroi) · Belgium +32 (0)10 86 12 42 · www.dreammachine.be · kids@dreammachine.beDigital Marketing to Kids 102 Digital Marketing to ‘Generation SpongeBob’ Gerda Van Damme & Guido Janssens (Dreammachine Kids) Whitepaper Update May 2014