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Challenges In Natural Rubber
 

Challenges In Natural Rubber

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In this presentation we tried to find out the challenges faced by the farmers in India.

In this presentation we tried to find out the challenges faced by the farmers in India.

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    Challenges In Natural Rubber Challenges In Natural Rubber Presentation Transcript

    • Gaurav Yadav
    • Is an elastomer—an elastic hydrocarbon  polymer—that was originally derived from a milky colloidal suspension, or latex, found in the sap of some plants The purified form of natural rubber is the  chemical poly-isoprene . The entropy model of rubber was developed in  1934 by Werner Kuhn.
    • Started in South America  South Americans had collected rubber from a  plant named Castilla elastica. These people used to play a ball game by  making balls of rubber. It was also used in making temporary  shoes, fixing stone and metal tools to wooden handles and making water proof clothes. It was later found that rubber was successful in  erasing or rubbing the pencil marks on the paper. That's how this material got the name ‘Rubber’
    • Generally cultivated in large plantations.  The soil is generally well-drained weathered  soil consisting of laterite, lateritic types, sedimentary types, non-lateritic red or alluvial soils.
    • (a) Rainfall of around 250 cm evenly distributed without any marked dry season and with at least 100 rainy days per annum (b) Temperature range of about 20°C to 34°C with a monthly mean of 25°C to 28°C (c) High atmospheric humidity of around 80% (d) Bright sunshine amounting to about 2000 hours per annum at the rate of 6 hours per day throughout the year and (e) Absence of strong winds.
    • High-yielding clones have been developed for  commercial planting. 2,000 kilograms of dry Rubber per hectare per  annum, when grown under ideal conditions.
    • The shell of half a coconut is used as the  collection container for the latex. The cups are supported by a wire that encircles  the tree. This wire incorporates a spring so that it can  stretch as the tree grows
    • The latex is led into the cup by a galvanised  quot;spoutquot; that has been . Tapping normally takes place early in the  morning when the internal pressure of the tree is highest. The latex, which contains 25 - 40% dry  rubber, is in the bark so the tapper must avoid cutting right through to the wood
    • Dry Natural Rubber process  Natural Rubber Latex process 
    • Household to industrial products  Door and window  profiles, hoses, belts, matting, flooring and dampeners Gloves  Adhesives  Textile industry 
    • Auto tyres  Auto tubes  automobile parts  footwear  belting  hoses  cycle tyres and tubes  cables and wires  camelback  battery boxes  latex products  pharmaceutical goods 
    • An extensive plantation sector  Indigenous availability of the basic raw  materials, like natural rubber, synthetic rubber, reclaim rubber, carbon black, rubber chemicals, fatty acids, rayon and nylon yarn and so on. A large domestic market.  Availability of cheap labour.  Training facility in various technical institutes.  On-going economic reforms.  Improved living standards of the masses. 
    • tyre sector  non-tyre sector 
    • 2nd in productivity  4th in production  4th in consumption  5th in area 
    • Marketing of Natural rubber is not as complex as  other commodities. It involves only a few intermediaries such as: Commission agents  Traders  Processors  Manufacturers  Market flow of rubber involved only one or two  intermediaries before reaching the factories. Market flow is only up to the company or end- users of processed rubber.
    • Usually farmers will make the sheets of rubber  and sell it none of the respondents were selling the latex due to the fact that its price is very less compared rubber sheets. A big farmer will own a sheet rolling machine  and all the nearby farmers will use his sheet rolling machine to make rubber sheets. In return the small farmers will give one days sheet as rent.
    • There is a Rubber Board consists of government agencies that  provides research, extension and marketing assistance to rubber producers. The Rubber Board had a headquarter which also serves as a  training center. World’s 4th largest producer of NR  Unique in India is the structure of production. While other  countries rely on large plantations, India’s rubber producers are smallholders, averaging less than 5 ha/family.
    • Processing & Quality up gradation. Aimed at improving the quality of rubber sheet produced in the region.  Promote group processing & effluent treatment through financial &  technical support.  Market promotion?? Transportation assistance for input items & latex.  Publication of price, participation in trade fairs & exhibitions.  Human Resource Development Training for growers, tappers, workers & other stake holders  Labour welfare activities.  Equipping training centres and expansion of office space and residential  buildings
    • To identify the implications of rubber farming  practices followed by the rural farmers. To identify the problems faced by rural farmers  in marketing the natural rubber.
    • Population  Research Methodology  Sampling  Sample size- 38  Scope of the study  Limitations of the study 
    • Number of farmers 1 1 to 5 5 to 10 18
    • Number of farmers 1 to 5 5 to 10 10 to 50 50 to 100 6% 5% 39% 50%
    • Number of farmers 10 10 9 8 7 6 6 5 Number of farmers 4 3 2 1 1 1 0 0 Less than 1 Year Between 1 to 5 Between 5 to 10 Between 10 to 20 above 20 Year Year Year Year
    • Number of farmers 8 8 8 7 6 5 4 Number of farmers 3 2 2 1 1 0 0 Less than 1 Year Between 1 to 5 Between 5 to 10 Between 10 to 20 above 20 Year Year Year Year
    • Number of farmers 0 Self Employed Worker 19
    • Number of farmers 1 Self Employed Worker 18
    • Number of farmers 2 Yes No 16
    • Number of farmers 12 12 10 8 6 Number of farmers 6 4 2 1 0 0 0 Less than 1 1 to 3 3 to 5 5 to 10 More than 10
    • Number of farmers 16 16 14 12 10 Number of farmers 8 6 4 2 1 2 0 0 0 Less than 1 1 to 3 3 to 5 5 to 10 More than 10
    • Number of farmers 18 18 16 14 12 10 Number of farmers 8 6 4 1 2 0 0 0 30-30-30 NPK Any of NPK Rotted cattle manure Compost and well rotted cattle manure
    • Number of farmers 19 20 18 16 14 12 10 Number of farmers 8 6 4 2 0 0 0 0 30-30-30 NPK Any of NPK Rotted cattle manure Compost and well rotted cattle manure
    • Number of farmers 19 20 16 18 16 14 12 10 5 8 3 6 4 2 0 Abnormal Leaf Fall Dry Rot, Stump Rot Shoot Rot Bird's Eye Spot Collar Rot or Charcoal Rot Number of farmers
    • Number of farmers Number of farmers 5 4 0 0 Abnormal Leaf Fall Dry Rot, Stump Rot Collar Shoot Rot Bird's Eye Spot Rot or Charcoal Rot
    • Number of farmer 15 16 14 12 10 Number of farmer 8 6 3 4 2 0 0 0 0 Less than 1 Km 1 to 5 Kms 5 to 10 Kms 10 to 20 Kms More than 20 Km
    • Number of farmer 19 20 18 16 14 12 Number of farmer 10 8 6 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 Less than 1 Km 1 to 5 Kms 5 to 10 Kms 10 to 20 Kms More than 20 Km
    • Number of farmers 18 18 16 14 12 10 Number of farmers 8 6 4 1 2 0 0 0 Commission agents Traders Processors Manufacturers
    • Number of farmers 14 14 12 10 8 Number of farmers 6 4 4 1 2 0 0 Commission agents Traders Processors Manufacturers
    • Factor Mean Operational difficulty due to 8.32 insufficient manpower Insufficient supply of planting 2.61 material Remoteness of plant location and poor 1.83 communication facility Occurrence of pests and diseases 3.43 Absence of price support and 5.71 Unstable price/fluctuation Price manipulation by the traders 1.21 Low product quality 7.21 Don’t have village level processing 4.12 plant Lack of storage 3.13
    • Factor Mean Operational difficulty due to 1.26 insufficient manpower Insufficient supply of planting 7.83 material Remoteness of plant location and poor 6.58 communication facility Occurrence of pests and diseases 2.48 Absence of price support and 2.12 Unstable price/fluctuation Price manipulation by the traders 8.65 Low product quality 4.21 Don’t have village level processing 6.38 plant Lack of storage 5.91
    • Number of farmers 19 20 18 16 14 12 Number of farmers 10 8 6 4 2 0 0 0 more Demand than supply more Supply than demand Supply and Demand are equal
    • Financial support to Board for Block Planting  Support to NGOs and SHGs to start nurseries. This is  a viable economic activity especially for Women SHGs. Policy decision for allotment of suitable land for  large scale planting of rubber by Private/ Government agencies. A Nodal agency to be identified by each State  Government to liaise with Rubber Board in Developmental activities. Sanction of Central Government for posting  essential staff and Allotment of land for Board’s research trials in the field