Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Projections Eps
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Projections Eps

5,448

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,448
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
175
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Map Projection & Coordinate  Systems (review) Ellipsoids and Datums ● Map Projections ● Coordinate Systems ● Philippine Coordinate System ●    
  • 2.  Ojibwe (Native American) ca. 1820, drawn on birch bark (which accounts for its shape),  shows the  migration legend of the Ojibwe, from the creation of their people to their home . Sketch maps on home ranges. Map  was made by Chris (middle schooler),  who rode bus #71.  Earth’s shape.  Without water and clouds, it looks like a      sloppily peeled potato.  European Remote Sensing  satellite, ERS­1 from 780 Km.
  • 3. The equatorial radius of the earth 3,443.609 – Airy (1830) 3,443.931 – Austrian Nat'l­South Am. (1969) 3,443.957 – Clark 1866 3,443.980 – Clark (1850) 3,443.939 – Geodetic Reference System (1980) 3,444.054 – International (1924) 3,443.917 – World Geodetic System (1972)   Defense Mapping Agency, Hydrographic Center, American Practical Navigator (1977),    Map Projections – A working Manual (1987)
  • 4. The equatorial radius of the earth 3,443.609 – Airy (1830) 3,443.931 – Austrian Nat'l­South Am. (1969) 3,443.957 – Clark 1866 3,443.980 – Clark (1850) 3,443.939 – Geodetic Reference System (1980) 3,444.054 – International (1924) 3,443.917 – World Geodetic System (1972)   Defense Mapping Agency, Hydrographic Center, American Practical Navigator (1977),    Map Projections – A working Manual (1987)
  • 5. •  How well can we hit Minsk, USSR with a missile  from Kansas (circa 1960)? Minsk (Pulkovo, 1942)  N  53° 52' 57.78quot;   E  028° 01' 58.00quot; Minsk (NAD­27)  N  53° 53' 02.76quot;   E  028° 01' 43.06” ∆ Latitude = ~ 5”,  ∆ Longitude = ~15” Around 313 meters of error
  • 6. These Coordinates Refer  to the Same Bridge! a)  37° 53.423’ N, 126° 43.990’ E, h = 23 m b)  37° 53.423’ N, 126° 43.990’ E, H = 0 m c)  37° 53’ 25.4” N, 126° 43’ 59.4” E, h = 23 m d)  37° 53’ 25.4” N, 126° 43’ 59.4” E, H = 0 m e)  37.89038° N, 126.73316° E, h = 23 m f)   37.89038° N, 126.73316° E, H = 0 m g)  Zone 52, 300669 m E, 4196075 m N, h = 23 m h)  Zone 52, 300669 m E, 4196075 m N, H = 0 m i)   52S CG 00668 96075, h = 23 m j)   52S CG 00668 96075, H = 0 m k)   ­3014326.6 m, 4039148.7 m, 3895863.0 m l)   37° 53.260’ N, 126° 44.116’ E, h ≅ H = 0 m m) 37° 53’ 15.6” N, 126° 44’ 6.9” E, h ≅ H = 0 m n)  37.88767° N, 126.73526° E, h ≅ H = 0 m o)  Zone 52, 300872 m E, 4195348 m N, h ≅ H = 0 m p)  52S CS 00870 95350, h ≅ H = 0 m q)  ­3014213.2 m, 4038687.9 m, 3895223.3 m
  • 7. Simplified Representation:  Geoid Ellipsoid Projection on  Planar map with developable surface coordinate system    
  • 8. Shape of the Earth Approximated by a mathematical model  ● represented by an ellipsoid (also called  spheroid) A number of cartographic ellipsoids has been  ● designed for certain portions of the Earth's  surface Ellipsoids are usually sufficient for horizontal  ● positioning; however, the geoid has to be used  for exact elevation calculations
  • 9. Ellipsoid Rotate Ellipse in 3 b     Dimensions: a Semi­major Axis:  a = 6371837 m Semi­minor Axis: b = 6356752.3142 Flattening Ratio:  f=(a­b)/a = 1/298.257223563
  • 10. Ellipsoids in various countries Ellipsoid Name Region of use Airy 1858 Great Britain Airy modified Ireland Australian National Australia Bessel 1841 Austria, Chile, Croatia, Czech Rep., Germany, Greece  Indonesia, Netherlands, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland Bessel modified Norway Clark 1880 Africa, France Clarke 1866 North America, Philippines Everest 1830 Afghanistan, Myanmar, India, Pakistan, Thailand,  other countries in southern Asia GRS 1980 North America, worldwide Hayford (Int'l) 1909 Beguim, Finland, italy, all countire using ED50 system New International 1967 many other countires Krassovsky 1938 Albania, Poland, Romania, Russia and neighboring countires WGS 1984 North America, worldwide WGS 1972 NASA satellite
  • 11. Traditional Horizontal Datums The Traditional Approach • Many nations established their own regional datum – Used various national standards and procedures – Different time frames – Calculated ellipsoids that fit well locally • Established initial point location and orientation with  astronomic observations Result: Inconsistent Datums
  • 12. Traditional Horizontal Datums Limitations to the Traditional Approach NAD 27 ED 50 (Clarke Ellipsoid ) (International Ellipsoid)
  • 13. Horizontal Datums Regional vs. Global Approach • Global replaces regional datums with a common,  accurate standard • One system for maps of the entire planet    
  • 14. DoD’s Satellite Derived  Horizontal Datum NIMA's World Geodetic System 1984    WGS ­ 84 is an Earth  Z Centred Earth Fixed Prime    An ellipsoid is placed  Meridian on top of the axis to Y create a geodetic foundation for the various coordinate systems. X WGS  84
  • 15. Vertical Datums Like horizontal measurements, elevation  only has meaning when referenced to some  start point.  MSL Elevation High Tide Mean Sea Level Low Tide Mean sea level is the most common vertical datum.
  • 16. A datum defines the  A coordinate system determines  initial point and reference  how locations are referenced from  surface the datum
  • 17. Map projection To transform a curved Earth surface into a  ● plane Direct projection of a spherical object to a plane  ● cannot be performed without distortion    
  • 18. The surface of the Earth tears when you peel and flatten it. Peel a globe and you will get globe gores. Most map projections stretch and distort the earth to  fill in  the tears. The Mercator projection preserves angles, and so shapes in limited areas, but it greatly distorts sizes. Look at the size of Greenland on the globe compared to the Mercator.    
  • 19. Different projections are designed to  minimize the distortion and preserve certain  properties: conformal ­ preserves angles (shapes for small  ● areas), used for navigation and most national  grids systems equidistant ­ preserves certain relative  ● distances, used for measurement of length equivalent ­ preserve area, used for  ● measurement of areas    
  • 20. Geometry of a developable surface cylindrical conic transforms  uses the  the spherical  tangent or  surface to  secant cone a tangent or  secant cylinder azimuthal use a tangent  or secant plane  (flat sheet)    
  • 21. Coordinate System Accurately identify a  Observer’s ● Z Meridian location on the Earth Defined by its origin  ● Latitude (prime meridian, datum),  Prime coordinate axes (x, y, z)  Meridian Y and untis (angle:  degree, gon, radiant;  Longitude length: meter, feet) X    
  • 22. Coordinate systems commonly  used in GIS geographic (global) coordinate system (latitude­ ● longitude) planar (cartesian) georeferenced coordinate  ● system (easting, northing, elevation) which  includes projection from an allipsoid to a plane,  with origin and axes tied to the Earth surface planar (cartesian) non­georeferenced coordinate  ● system, such as image coordinate system with  origin and axes defined arbitrarily (e.g. image  corner) without defining its position on the Earth.
  • 23. Geographic coordinate system:  latitude­longitude Most common for glaoal data coverage ● Meridians are the longitude lines connecting the  ● north and south poles (0­180 degrees east from  the prime meridian and 0­180 degrees west) 0 degrees longitude is the prime meridian and  ● 1980 degrees longitude is the international date  line
  • 24. Geographic coordinate system:  latitude­longitude Parallels are the latitude lines which form a  ● around the Earth parallel with the equator (0­90  degrees north and 0­90 degrees south of the  equator) Decimal values ­ W and S  as negative  ● numbers, N and E as positive (­1.167 deg, 38.0  deg) Sexasgesimal ­ always use positive number  ● together with N, S, E, W (1:10:00W, 38:00:00N)
  • 25. N Greenwich, UK Longitude Equator Prime Meridian Latitude
  • 26. Universal Transverse Mercator  •Projecting the sphere onto a cylinder  tangent to a central meridian.  •Distortion of scale, distance, direction  and area increase away from the central  meridian.   •If you rotate the cylinder every 6º of  longitude you create the UTM projection.    •This projection is used on map scales of  1:500,000 and larger      (TPCs, JOGs, and TLMs). 
  • 27. UTM Coordinates • Flat Grid extending from 84N to 80S • Each zone is numbered Eastward starting at  177°W (6° wide from 180°W to 174°W) • Coordinates are read east then north • Many map products from  foreign countries use UTMs • Most often used on large  scale maps and charts e.g. TLM, JOGs, TPCs
  • 28. Universal Transverse Mercator The UTM graticule coverage  Each belt is 6O in longitude wide 84o N 0 meters N Equator 10,000,000m N 80o S 180o 180o 0o   1  30     60   
  • 29. Universal Transverse Mercator Grid Central  Meridian  2   3 16o  7   8    4  5      5   6   6   7  8 4    2   3  4   5   6   7  8    2  3                1,700,000 1,600,000 1,500,000 1,400,000 1,300,000 1,200,000 1,100,000 1,000,000 900,000 800,000 700,000 600,000 500,000 400,000 0 o 300,000 0o 200,000 100,000   2   3   4   7   8   5   6    4   5   6 7   8 174o 156o   2   3     2   3   4   5   6  7   8 Zone 2 168o Zone 3 162o Zone 4 03 508,256mE 0,567,359mN
  • 30. Sample Coordinates ECEF Cartesian Coordinates: X= 1,109,928m  Y= ­4,860,097m  Z= 3,965,162m Geographic: 38°.684N, 077°.150W    38° 41.145' N, 077° 08.135’ W 38° 41' 08.73quot; N, 077° 08’ 08.37quot; W GEOREF: GJNJ5141  UTM:  18 314,251mE 4,284,069mN  MGRS: 18S UH 1425 8406 (New)   18S UT 1421 8385 (Old)
  • 31. Luzon Datum of 1911 Origin near San Andres Point on Marinduque  ● island Ellipsoid of reference is the Clarke 1866 ● Controlled by 98 measure baselines, 52  ● observed azimuths, 49 latitude and longitude  stations Philippine topographic maps uses the Luzon  ● 1911 datum    
  • 32. Philippine Transverse Mercator Divided into 4 zones ● False easting at the Central Meridian of 500 km ● Scale Factor at Origin = 0.9995 ● False Northing Latitude of Origin = 04:00:00 ● Central Meridian of Zones II, III, IV = 121  ● degrees, 123 degrees, 125 degrees     
  • 33. Philippine Reference System of  1992 (PRS92) Determination of seven (70 Bursa­Wolf  ● transformation parameters detween Luzon  Datum of 1911 and WGS 84 So far no accuracy statesments were published ● It is still the original Luzon Datum of 1911 with  ● published transformation parameters frpm  WGS84 datum    
  • 34.    
  • 35. Datums, Projections, &  Coordinates Review • Know What Datums Exist in AOR • Always Pass Datum w/Coordinate • Understand Map Projection Used for Your  Products • Understand Coordinate System in Use • Know Resources to Transform Datums  and Convert Coordinates Questions?    
  • 36. References Neteler, M. & Mitasova, H. 2004. Open source GIS: a  GRASS GIS approach, 2nd edition. The Netherlands:  Kluwer Academic Publishers Burrough, P. A. & McDonnel R.A. 1998. Principles of  Geographical Information System. New York, USA:  Oxford University Press Dent, B.  1990. Cartography Thematic Map Design, 2nd  Edition. USA: Wm. C. Brown Publishers Datum and Grids. Navigator of the Navy. link:  https://www.navigator.navy.mil/navigator/coordinates.p pt    
  • 37. License of this Document This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en License details: Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 You are free: - to copy, distribute, display, and perform the work, - to make derivative works, - to make commercial use of the work, under the following conditions: Attribution. You must give the original author credit. Share Alike. If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under a license identical to this one. For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. Any of these conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder. Your fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above. Emmanuel P. Sambale. November, 2006 http://esambale.wikispaces.com    

×