Don't Raise Your Hand! Boost Comprehension with Dialogue 2014
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Don't Raise Your Hand! Boost Comprehension with Dialogue 2014

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International Reading Association Conference presentation on facilitating dialogue about text at the elementary and middle levels: noticing/questioning, nonfiction text, common conversations with ...

International Reading Association Conference presentation on facilitating dialogue about text at the elementary and middle levels: noticing/questioning, nonfiction text, common conversations with older readers

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  • Mon., May 12, room 261 @11 a.m. E will welcome folks and introduce the session and speakers.
  • Robin: First we’d like to know our audience. Raise your hand if you are a primary classroom teacher (K-2), an intermediate teacher (3-5), a middle teacher (6-8), a high school teacher, a reading or instructional coach, an administrator, etc. etc.
  • Elizabeth: to set the stage for the workshop, I’m going to share some research about reading comprehension because While all components of the reading process are important, reading comprehension is the goal of reading.
  • How many kids do you see in this picture? 6. Imagine that they are teacher-identified successful, fluentreaders. Applegate, Applegate, and Modla conducted a study in which they administered a reading inventory to a big group of children who teachers identified as successful, fluent readers. The findings were interesting.
  • They found that on average, 1/3 of the teacher-identified fluent successful readers in their study struggled with comprehension. To avoid a situation in which readers can read the words but lack understanding of the text (e.g., Applegate, Applegate, & Modla, 2009), we should emphasize meaning making while reading at all levels and create situations in which readers are supported in their efforts to make meaning. We got this, right? So how do we go about supporting comprehension in classrooms? Back in the 70’s Delores Durkin did research in which she found that teachers were not support comprehension development in classrooms – they were pretyt good at assessing it – asking questions after text was read – but not teaching it. Since then, many educators have embraced explicit comprehension strategies instruction.
  • Inarguably, both direct comprehension strategies and menaing-based discussion about text can be powerful, but when they go head-to-head, which is more effective in terms of comprehension development?
  • Discussing text to enhance understanding has a proven track record in the literature (Lee & Smagorinsky, 2000), but many educators have sacrificed discussion for direct strategies instruction. Critics and research point out some flaws in relying on strategy instruction. Teaching formal skills that may or may not be necessary for the text at hand may not be the best use of time. For example, in a two-year experiment, McKeown, Beck, and Blake (RRQ, 2009) found that an instructional approach in which fifth grade students focused on the content of text through meaning-based questions/discussion was more effective in terms of comprehension than a procedural comprehension strategies-based approach.
  • In this workshop, we want to broaden reading instruction past a focus on teacher-led whole class instruction.
  • We want to emphasize the power of multiple reading instructional formats (whole class, small flexible groups, one-on-one conferencing – and reading formats (read aloud, small group, partner reading, independent reading) based on students’ needs and interests. Literature instruction should involve students who are reaidng lots of books and documents of all kinds, meeting in pairs and small groups to engage in provocative conversations about what they have read , participating in whole class discussions, taking stances for and against the views they find in books, and engaging in accountable-talk interactions.Provide lots of just-right high--interests texts.Provide time to read the texts in class.Focus on higher-order comprehension instruction (push them past reading quickly to grasp plot/gist of what they read)If you do this, you’ll see comprehension AND motivation/engagement increase.Lucy Calkins (Pathways to the Common Core, 2012) While personal responses and connections/disconnections are ok, help kids push past this to address the textual analysis emphasis in the standards: critical reading; reasoning and use evidence; comprehend, evaluate, synthesize; comprehend and evaluate; cite specific evidence; understand precisely … question… assess the veracity; evaluate other points of view critically; reading independently and closely; demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text; refer to the details and examples in a text; quote accurately from a text; objective summary; determine … describe … explain … compare and contrast … analyze.
  • We want to help you see the possibilities of talk about text in this session.
  • Spend some time around six year olds and you’ll be reminded all too often that the world is passing us by without us noticing the little details. Primary grade children are noticers and questioners. Like the young child that lies in the middle of the sidewalk to study a trail of ants, the young reader must be a noticer of details in the text and in the illustrations. Furthermore, young children are excellent questioners. “How do fish sleep?” and “We live in a suburban, right?” Teachers want to capitalize on these skills. My session will focus on the role of noticing and questioning. We will explore this concept first with our own reading processes and then with examples from the classroom.
  • Furthermore, young children are excellent questioners. “How do fish sleep?” and “We live in a suburban, right?” Teachers want to capitalize on these skills. My session will focus on the role of noticing and questioning. We will explore this concept first with our own reading processes and then with examples from the classroom.
  • When kids come across a page like this, they talk about it. They want to show others what they’ve found. They want to share what they already know. They want to know more. Many teachers, on the other hand, find it easy to talk students through stories via picture walks and facilitate plot, character, and conflict related conversations among students. Non-fiction texts, on the other hand, often appear to leave little room for the potential differences in interpretation, leaving teachers with the sense that there is no interesting way to talk about such fact-based texts. We want to provide spaces where this kind of real talk happens—where kids have opportunities to share and question, rather than only respond to questions designed by others, so we’ll focus on options for stepping away from the traditional IRE approach and beginning to encourage authentic conversations about nonfiction.
  • Overview: embrace the chaos – scaffold discussions: teach older kids (4th/5th-8th)how to discuss common books beginning with whole class/fish bowl, then small group literature circle discussions, then try common conversations. We’ll also talk about high-interest/lower level books and the power of edgy books.
  • 12:50
  • Kylene Beers and Robert Probst  (Notice and Note, 2013) say: If your principal walks in and observes the “chaos” of talk about books, remind her or him that the students are engaged in purposeful dialogic conversations about texts because research shows that it results in increased engagement and achievement.

Don't Raise Your Hand! Boost Comprehension with Dialogue 2014 Don't Raise Your Hand! Boost Comprehension with Dialogue 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • Don’t Raise Your Hand!: Boost Comprehension and Engagement with Meaningful Talk International Reading Association, May 2014 Amy Broemmel (University of Tennessee) Robin Griffith (Texas Christian University) Elizabeth Swaggerty (East Carolina University)
  • Comprehension
  • 1/3 of the teacher-identified “successful” readers struggled with comprehension
  • Direct Comprehension Strategies Meaning-based Discussion about TextVs.
  • McKeown, Beck, and Blake (2009): focusing on the content of text through meaning-based questions/discussion was more effective than a procedural comprehension strategies-based approach.
  • Reading lots of books and texts Meeting in pairs and small groups to engage in interesting, engaging conversations about the text Participating in whole class discussions Taking stances for and against the views they find in books Engaging in accountable-talk interactions.
  • Talk about text
  • Pick Two 11:20-12:00 Breakout 1 12:05- 12:45 Breakout 2
  • Noticers and Questioners Robin
  • Noticers and Questioners
  • Real Talk about Real Stuff
  • Moving Toward Common Conversations with Older Readers
  • Robin: Noticers & Questioners Amy: Nonfiction Dialogue Elizabeth: Older Readers 11:20-12:00 Breakout 1 12:05- 12:45 Breakout 2
  • Wrap Up
  • purposeful dialogic conversations
  • Presentation Handouts: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B6_L6 NVBWjDBZkZCR2RvVlRPQjA&usp=sharing
  • Amy Broemmel University of Tennessee broemmel@utk.edu Robin Griffith Texas Christian University r.griffith@tcu.edu Elizabeth Swaggerty East Carolina University swaggertye@ecu.edu