Literate environment analysis presentation

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A summary of how I have worked to create a literate environment in my first grade classroom

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Literate environment analysis presentation

  1. 1. Introduction What is a literate environment? What components do you look for in a literate environment? Learners Texts Instruction All components are influenced by a particular perspective
  2. 2. Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners What I did Running Record Motivation to Read Survey (McKenna & Kear, 1990) McKenna, M. C., & Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626-639. Retrieved from the Education Research Complete database.
  3. 3. Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners Why I chose these assessments Authentic Afflerbach: “focuses on an intact act of reading and provides both reading process and product information “ (2004, p. 40) Tompkins: “collect valuable information about the strategies and skills students use to decode words and construct meaning “ (2010, p. 88) Afflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment, K–12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  4. 4. Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners Why I chose these assessments Non-cognitive aspect Motivation to read Attitude about reading Academic Recreational
  5. 5. Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners What I discovered Running record Ladybug Firefly Grasshopper
  6. 6. Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners What I discovered Motivation to Read Survey (McKenna & Kear, 1990) Ladybug Firefly Grasshopper McKenna, M. C., & Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626-639. Retrieved from the Education Research Complete database.
  7. 7. Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners How this impacted my instruction Background knowledge Mini-lessons Phonics sounds (soft “c” and “g”) Using context clues Reading out loud
  8. 8. Selecting Texts Linguistic Informational Narrative Semiotic Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010). Analyzing and selecting text. The beginning reader. (Video Webcast). The beginning reader, prek-3. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved fromhttps://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flaunch er%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_4210429_1%26url%3D
  9. 9. Selecting Texts Unit Overview When I grow up, I want to be a … Narrative, informational, online texts “Twin texts” Variety of reading is important Using the matrix, you can keep your selections in balance
  10. 10. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective What is the interactive perspective? How often is it used in my first grade classroom? Why is it important for learners? Dr. Janice Almasi- The ultimate goal of the interactive perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can navigate the textual world independently (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010) Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010). Interactive perspective: Strategic processing. (Video Webcast). The beginning reader, prek-3. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved fromttps://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher% 3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_4210429_1%26url%3D
  11. 11. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective Lesson Plan: Careers Focus: Understanding informational text features Lesson Outline: • Four groups/career choices • Read informational text, highlighting features • Create informational text using features • Assessment data
  12. 12. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective  What I learned  “Instruction that emphasizes reading to learn and sharing information with others has proven effective in increasing students’ engagement, application of strategies, and comprehension” (Duke, 2004, p. 43)  What I would change for next time  What I felt went really well Duke, N. K. (2004). The case for informational text. Educational leadership, 61(6), 40-44.
  13. 13. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Responses Perspectives What is the critical perspective? What is the response perspective? Why are they important to teach from? “If there is any hope to be found, it might well be in the realization that we can still create cultural niches where the children (and we ourselves) can develop as critically literate beings who are going to keep trying to make the world a better place” (Leland, Harste, & Huber, 2005, p. 268). Leland, C., Harste, J., & Huber, K. (2005). Out of the box: Critical literacy in a first-grade classroom. Language Arts, v82 n4, p257268.
  14. 14. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Responses Perspectives Lesson Plan: Ruby Bridges and Amazing Grace Focus: Understanding author purpose and multiple perspectives Lesson Outline: • Small group: Ruby Bridges from multiple perspectives (Subtext strategy) • Whole group: Amazing Grace from multiple perspectives • Journal Response: “I admire Ruby and/or Grace because…”
  15. 15. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Reflective Perspectives Student Summaries: I admire Grace because she believed in her self. I admire Ruby and Grace because they stand up for her self. I admire Grace because she didn't giv up. I admire Ruby and Grace because thay showed perseverance! (Firefly) I admire Ruby and Grace because I can do anything if I want. I admire Ruby because she was not and nevr was scared. I admire Ruby because she was the first one to go to the white school. (Ladybug) I admire Ruby because she is cool. I admire Grace because he has knfdins (translated: confidence). I admire Ruby and Grace because they didn’t listen to other people. I admire Ruby and Grace because they dident lesten wen uther people sad thet they cant. I admire Ruby and Grace because they shod prsuvirin’s. (Grasshopper) I admire Ruby and Grace because they would be good friends together.
  16. 16. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Reflective Perspectives  What I learned  What I would change for next time  What I felt went really well
  17. 17. Helpful Resources Stepping inside the story world: The Subtext Strategy- A tool for connecting and comprehending (J.A. Clyde, 2003) Using interactive read-alouds and reader response to shape students’ concept of care (Durand, Howell, Schumacher, & Sutton, 2008) Out of the Box: Critical Literacy in a First-Grade Classroom (Leland, Harste, & Huber, 2005)
  18. 18. Feedback What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruction from viewing this presentation? How might the information presented change your literacy practices and/or your literacy interactions with students? In what ways can I support you in the literacy development of your students or children? How might you support me in my work with students or your children? What questions do you have?
  19. 19. Special Thanks To My amazing students, in particular Grasshopper, Firefly, and Ladybug My instructor, Dr. Bernice Gregory My colleagues, both through Walden University and Pearl Creek

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