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Got TPACK: Julie Coiro Keynote
 

Got TPACK: Julie Coiro Keynote

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This is from a follow-up session for the Massachusetts New Literacies Initiative

This is from a follow-up session for the Massachusetts New Literacies Initiative

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  • Spencer: social theorist who analyzed the role of education in social change
  • Recognize this is a process – everyone is different – has lots to do with comfort level and not just knowledge and it can be made better or worse by the TPACK level of others you work with. Most importantly, the overlap between these ideas is critical – because when one new tool or piece of content or way to teach is introduced into the picture, the entire TPACK image gets shifted around. It’s REALLY important to recognize this, determine your strengths, and weaknesses, and plan for what steps you can manage to address first. Give example of preparing for this talk today:
  • Give example of preparing for this talk today: PCK: I know the content, although the activity types of Harris & Hofer are new to me, and I’ve taught this material before, so about an 8. TCK: I normally use slides to prompt questions and discussion and I travel around to listen, and then share as a group – but I’m brand new at using a webinar, the tools, not having face to face contact, and navigating responses from 100 different people in the form of text snippets and scrolling boxes); also selecting tools (often select videos to share and prompt discussion; but nervous about navigating all of this and how to make it all work) TPK: This webinar idea is brand new – I have no feedback from anyone, which is how I monitor my teaching style; I also use lots of “zoom ins” to present my material, and I wasn’t sure if it would work, or how it would work, so I didn’t use it, but as a result, I worry about the level of PCK and my ability to communicate the content to you in a way that makes sense and is engaging. So, I took some steps to read a tutorial for Illuminate, attended another webinar to see what it’s like to be on the receiving end, and tried to integrate some of the “pedagogical” strengths (e,g., facilitating discussion) into today’s presentation to see what happens. I’ll monitor the efffectiveness, and use this information to decide how to improve next time.
  • So, rank yourself on each, given an individual score, and then a team total > send this along in a text message (15 + 12 + 18 + 25 = TOTAL); Open it up for oral comments about how of your individual and group awareness of these issues may help further progress in planning effective teaching and deep learning with technology.
  • So, rank yourself on each, given an individual score, and then a team total > send this along in a text message (15 flow + 12 flexible + 18 fullfiller + 25 flexible = TOTAL); Open it up for oral comments about how of your individual and group awareness of these issues may help further progress in planning effective teaching and deep learning with technology.
  • From a TPACK perspective, this represents the TK – what technology features are available and how do I use them; TPK: how do I use them to teach; TPCK: how do I use them to teach this particular content – guided by your learning goals and your awareness of conceptual challenges students face in that content, you can then recognize the “affordances” of this website to address your goals and address needs of particular learners – and then select websites and design learning experiences that point students to these features or offer support in using them (design a “frame” around the website to foster learning)
  • From a TPACK perspective, this represents the TK – what technology features are available and how do I use them; TPK: how do I use them to teach; TPCK: how do I use them to teach this particular content – guided by your learning goals and your awareness of conceptual challenges students face in that content, you can then recognize the “affordances” of this website to address your goals and address needs of particular learners – and then select websites and design learning experiences that point students to these features or offer support in using them (design a “frame” around the website to foster learning)
  • From a TPACK perspective, this represents the TK – what technology features are available and how do I use them; TPK: how do I use them to teach; TPCK: how do I use them to teach this particular content – guided by your learning goals and your awareness of conceptual challenges students face in that content, you can then recognize the “affordances” of this website to address your goals and address needs of particular learners – and then select websites and design learning experiences that point students to these features or offer support in using them (design a “frame” around the website to foster learning)

Got TPACK: Julie Coiro Keynote Got TPACK: Julie Coiro Keynote Presentation Transcript

  • Follow-Up Session Feb. 16, 2011 Facilitator: Julie Coiro [email_address]
  • Where are we headed?
    • Review the “layers” of the TPACK model and implications for planning your instruction
    • Reflect on your own TPACK levels and implications for working as a team to design, implement, monitor, and redesign your lessons
    • Ask questions and reflect on readings
    • Apply the TPACK model to consider ways of using content-area websites wisely
  • What knowledge is of most worth (when designing instruction)? Herbert Spencer, Social Theorist, 1859
    • 2006 - 2010: In the midst of fast-paced technological changes, the knowledge of most worth is TPACK …
    an ability to flexibly draw from and integrate K nowledge of T echnology, P edagogy, A nd C ontent (and their relationship to each other) into your curriculum and instructional practices Mishra & Koehler (2006)
  • New times + new literacies = new mindsets
    • New times (e.g., de Argaez, 2006; Friedman, 2005; Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2000-2009, P21, 2004-2010)
    • New literacies (e.g., Coiro, Knobel, Lankshear, & Leu, 2008; Leu, Kinzer, Coiro, & Cammack, 2004; Spires, 2008)
    • New mindsets (Lankshear & Knobel, 2007)
    • 1. Same as always - now things are just “technologized”
    • 2. The world is fundamentally different - with new ways of doing things and new ways of being that are enabled by new technologies
  • Why TPACK?
    • Learning how to use technology is much different than knowing what to do with it for instructional purposes (e.g., Smartboard; Ning; Google Docs)
    • Designing (or redesigning ) instruction requires an understanding of how knowledge about content, pedagogy, and technology overlap to inform your choices for curriculum and instruction
  • What is TPACK? http://tpack.org/ Mishra & Koehler (2006)
  • 7 Pieces of the TPACK Pie
    • C ontent [ CK ]: subject matter to be learned
    • T echnology [ TK ]: foundational and new technologies
    • P edagogy [ PK ]: purpose, values & methods used to teach and evaluate learning
    • PCK: What pedagogical strategies make concepts difficult or easy to learn?
    • TCK : How is content represented and transformed by the application of technology?
    • TPK: What pedagogical strategies enable you to get the most out of existing technologies for teaching & evaluating learning?
    • TPACK :Understanding the relationship between elements -- “a change in any one factor has to be ‘compensated’ by changes in the other two”
  • TPACK Guidelines
    • Content focus: What content does this lesson focus on?
    • Pedagogical focus: What pedagogical practices are employed in this lesson?
    • Technology used: What technologies are used?
    • PCK: Do these pedagogical practices make concepts clearer and/or foster deeper learning?
    • TCK : Does the use of technology help represent the content in diverse ways or maximize opportunities to transform the content in ways that make sense to the learner?
    • TPK: Do the pedagogical practices maximize the use of existing technologies for teaching and evaluating learning?
    • TPCK : How might things need to change if one aspect of the lesson were to be different or not available?
  • Implications of TPACK for you… Consider how your pedagogical approaches might be framed to effectively integrate technology into content-area instruction? What new knowledge/skills might you need? How does one small difference influence your remaining “circles of knowledge”?
  • Reflecting on the TPACK model
    • Developing TPACK knowledge is a PROCESS .
    • The process is impacted by every new CHANGE that is introduced into the overlapping circles of knowledge.
    • Each of you is UNIQUE with different abilities and comfort levels in terms of content, pedagogy, and technology use.
    • Your “personal TPACK level” can be impacted (for better or worse) by the TPACK levels of others you work with.
    • Recognize it, determine your personal and team strengths and challenges, and work together to identify manageable steps to address needs that suit your learners best.
  • Monitoring My Own TPACK Level Pedagogical Content Knowledge (1 low – 10 high) (How to teach particular content-based material) Technological Content Knowledge (1 low – 10 high) (How to select and use technologies to communicate particular content knowledge) Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (1 low–10 high) (How to use particular technologies when teaching)
      • For me... this webinar … has shaken my TPACK confidence
    8 5 2 Total 15/30
  • Let’s stop and reflect on your TPACK level… Pedagogical Content Knowledge (1 low – 10 high) (How to teach particular content-based material) Technological Content Knowledge (1 low – 10 high) (How to select and use technologies to communicate particular content knowledge) Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (1 low–10 high) (How to use particular technologies when teaching)
      • Think of a particular curriculum unit. Rank your knowledge (and comfort) level…and come up with an individual and team total.
    ? ? ? Total ??
  • What about your Planning Preferences?
      • Tubin & Edri (2004): Teachers Planning and
      • Implementing ICT-Based Practices
    Flow Flexible Fulfiller Broad outline with emergent details & implementation Focus on process and responding to students’ ideas Detailed program with adjusted implementation Focus on fulfilling the output plans with flexibility Fixed outline and details with exact implementation Focus on the inputs – things that should be done
    • TALK, POST, & SHARE (10-15 minutes)
    • TALK : Discuss and tally your individual and team TPACK totals and your planning preferences.
    • POST : Post your individual TPACK totals and planning preferences for your group in a text message (e.g.,15 flow + 12 flexible + 18 fullfiller + 25 flexible = TPACK team score of 70)
    • SHARE : (Talk orally in the Illuminate webinar): How might your individual and group awareness of these ideas foster your team’s ability to plan and reflect on lessons with technology and your future professional development needs?
  • Next steps…
    • Plan 1: Pose questions about the readings (via text or voice) and we can discuss together
    • Plan 2: I can share a specific application/adaptation of these ideas to ways of thinking about how to use websites most effectively to foster content-area learning
  • Questions/Concerns…
    • Your thoughts after working in small groups:
    • What opportunities do you currently provide to: (a) enhance students’ knowledge building and (b) enable them to celebrate and express/showcase their knowledge in ways that link to your content-area learning goals?
    • What role might technology play in diversifying knowledge building and/or expression in your content area?
    • Which activity type(s) [Harris & Hofer, 2009] aligns best with your learning purposes that deepens students’ knowledge of challenging aspects of your curriculum unit?
  • Questions/Concerns… Other questions…
  • Using Websites Wisely (Coiro & Fogleman 2011 – Educational Leadership )
    • How can you effectively capitalize on Internet resources for teaching and learning in your content area?
      • What do content area websites offer?
      • What do you hope students will learn and be able to do during and after a website learning experience?
      • What might you need to add (or take away) from the experience to best address your curriculum objectives and higher-level thinking goals?
  • Using Websites Wisely (Coiro & Fogleman 2011 – Educational Leadership )
    • Clarify your learning goals: What do you want students to understand and be able to do?
    • Reflect on efficacy of current methods and materials :
      • What concepts are most challenging for students?
      • What learning scaffolds do you currently use or would you like to have?
      • Could part of your lesson be more engaging?
      • Would concepts be clearer if represented in a different format (image, video, animation, simulation)
    • What “type” of website have you found?
    • It depends…All websites
    • are NOT created equal!
    • Type of content
      • Text-based
      • Multimodal (text, images, sound, and movement)
      • Interactive (can respond to and control)
    • Level of instructional support
      • No instructional support
      • Instructional features (isolated tools or activities)
      • Instructional interface (embedded content and supports)
  • Using Websites Wisely (Coiro & Fogleman 2011 – Educational Leadership )
    • Three types of informational websites
    • Web-based informational reading systems – enticing content, but no scaffolds for teachers or students in how to use or learn from the information (like an online book or database)
    • Web-based interactive learning systems – interactive features that enable students to actively engage with key concepts; often grouped by theme or linked to educ. standards
    • Web-based instructional learning systems – an “instructional system” designed for learners rather than readers ; information embedded into an instructional interface with supports for students and/or teachers
  • Using Websites Wisely (Coiro & Fogleman 2011 – Educational Leadership )
    • Explore the multimodal and interactive features at many content-specific websites (and discuss the possibilities for engaging students with deeper learning opportunities)
    • http://www.lite.iwarp.com/CoiroWSRA2010.html
    • Consider your level of TPACK knowledge and what steps to take next…
  • TPACK Guidelines
    • Content focus: What content does this lesson focus on?
    • Pedagogical focus: What pedagogical practices are employed in this lesson?
    • Technology used: What technologies are used?
    • PCK: Do these pedagogical practices make concepts clearer and/or foster deeper learning?
    • TCK : Does the use of technology help represent the content in diverse ways or maximize opportunities to transform the content in ways that make sense to the learner?
    • TPK: Do the pedagogical practices maximize the use of existing technologies for teaching and evaluating learning?
    • TPCK :How might things need to change if one aspect of the lesson were to be different or not available?
    • GUIDING QUESTIONS ALIGNED TO TPACK MODEL
    • (at the wikispace)
    • RUBRIC ALIGNED TO TPACK MODEL
    • (Download from the Inquiry Page)
    • THE QUESTION TO KEEP REVISITING…
    • How can you best use new technologies associated with your content objectives to promote student learning ?
    Thank you! [email_address]