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Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007
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Parenting Moves Online: Parents' Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007

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Report of a nationally representative poll (conducted August 2007) of U.S. parents regarding their children's use of the internet.

Report of a nationally representative poll (conducted August 2007) of U.S. parents regarding their children's use of the internet.

Published in: Technology, Education
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    • 1. Parenting Moves Online: Parents ’ Internet Actions and Attitudes, 2007 A Cable in the Classroom & Common Sense Media Poll Conducted by Harris Interactive ®
    • 2. Who We Are
      • Cable in the Classroom (CIC), the cable industry’s education foundation, works to expand and enhance learning opportunities for children and youth. Created in 1989 to help schools take advantage of educational cable programming and technology, CIC has become a leading national advocate for media literacy education and for the use of technology and media for learning, as well as a valuable resource for educational cable content and services for policymakers, educators and industry leaders. For more information about Cable in the Classroom, please visit: www.ciconline.org .
    • 3. Who We Are
      • Common Sense Media is the nation’s leading nonpartisan organization dedicated to improving the impact of media and entertainment on kids and families. Common Sense Media provides trustworthy ratings and reviews of media and entertainment based on child development criteria created by leading national experts. For more information, visit www.commonsensemedia.org .
    • 4. Poll Methodology
      • Harris Interactive ® telephone survey
      • August 16 & August 17, 2007
      • 2,030 U.S. adults ages 18+, 411 parents or guardians of online children ages 6 to 18
    • 5. Percent of Parents Who Have Talked to Their Children About: Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 6. By Age, Percent of Parents Who Have Talked to Their Children About: Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 7. Percent of Parents Who Have Monitored the Web sites Their Children Visit: Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 8. By Parent Engagement, Percent of Parents Who Strongly/ Somewhat Agree That the Internet Helps Their Children to: Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 9. Percentage of Parents Whose Children Have Experienced Issues Online Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007). 71 percent of parents said their child had encountered at least one issue
    • 10. By Gender, Parents Views of Propriety of Select Online Activities for Their Own Child Searchable personal profile/webpage Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007). Play online games with others
    • 11. Percent of Parents Who Strongly/Somewhat Agree that the Internet Helps Their Child to: Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 12. By Views of Internet Helpfulness, Percent of Parents Whose Children Have Experienced Issues Online Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 13. By Age, Percent of Parents Whose Children Have Experienced Issues Online Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 14. Parents Views of Propriety of Select Online Activities for Their Own Child Searchable personal profile/webpage Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007). Play online games with others
    • 15. By Age, Percent of Parents Who Have Monitored the Web sites Their Children Visit Source: Cable in the Classroom/Common Sense Media/Harris Interactive (August 2007).
    • 16. Recommendations for Parents
      • Talk regularly with their children about their Internet use and seek out high-tech parenting advice from trusted sources
      • Speak with their children about Internet safety and appropriate online behavior and about more frequently experienced issues
      • Engage even very young children
      • Look to teachers and schools as partners
    • 17. Reaction to the Poll
      • “This poll underscores what we at the PTA have advocated for a long time—the vital importance of parents getting involved and engaged in their children’s lives, online and offline. Parents need simple, specific, and age-appropriate tools and information to help them engage in their kids’ online lives.”
      • - Jan Harp Domene, PTA National President
    • 18. Where Parents Can Find More Information
      • www.ciconline.org/mediasmartparents
      • www.commonsensemedia.org
      • www.pointsmartclicksafe.org

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