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Mark twain

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  • 1. MARK TWAIN By Donna S. Dixon
  • 2. BACKGROUND Also known as:  Moved to Hannibal, Missouri in 1839, on the Mississippi River Samuel Langhorne Clemens:  His father passed when he was just Born: November 30, 1835 in 12 years old and soon after begin Florida, Missouri. writing for his brother Orion’s Parents: John Marshall and Jane newspaper. “Hannibal Journal” Moffit Clemens and was the sixth  Twain contributed reports, poems, child. and humorous sketches to the Journal for several years. Since Samuel was born 2 months premature and therefore he suffered for the first 10 years with his health.
  • 3. MISSISSIPPI RIVER Twain persuaded a riverboat pilot by the name of Horace Bixby to teach him the skills of piloting. In April of 1859, Twain had become a licensed riverboat pilot. Mark Twain was established on February 3, 1863. “The phrase, meaning two fathoms deep, was called in making soundings from Mississippi Riverboats”.
  • 4. BACKGROUND Married: Olivia L. Langdon on February 2, 1870. They had four children. One son Langdon and three daughters: Susy, Clara, and Jean. In 1872, Langdon their infant son died. In 1874, Mark Twain and his family moved into a 19- room house in Hartford, Connecticut.
  • 5. MARK TWAIN Tw a i n w r o t e t h e m a j o r i t y o f h i s Twain’s Quote: major works at homeTo us, our house…hadheart, and a soul, andeyes to see us with; andapprovals andsolicitudes and deepsympathies; it was ofus, and we were in itsconfidence and lived inits grace and the peaceof its benediction.
  • 6. A FEW OF TWAIN’S SHORT STORIES AND NOVELS 1873: 1st Novel: Roughing It. The  Adventures of Huckleberry title refers to the decades Finn was considered to be succeeding the Civil War. Twain’s greatest work. 1876: The Adventures of Tom  1889: A Connecticut Yankee in Sawyer. Twain’s first major use of King Arthur’s Court. memories of his childhood. 1880: A Tramp Abroad.  1892: The American Claimant. 1882: The Prince and the Pauper.  1894: The Tragedy of Pudd’n 1883: Life on the Mississippi. head Wilson. 1884 in the United Kingdom and  1889: The Man That Corrupted 1885 in the United States: Hadleyburg. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
  • 7. MARK TWAIN
  • 8. AS THE HUMOR UNFOLDS  Twain was best known as a humorist.  “He was a great fictionist and a rough-hewn stylist” (Garland)  “His verbal mannerism became a trademark: impassive, diffident, drawling, even bumbling” (Perkins)  Twain was constantly the binary man, speaking with a dual voice. His nom de plume, expressed this split personality.  “Twain was an improviser, an oral performer depending on an audience for his best effects”. (Perkins)
  • 9. WHAT OTHER AUTHORS SAID ABOUT TWAIN: He is “A gifted raconteur, distinctive humorist, and irascible moralist, he transcended the apparent limitations of his origins to become a popular public figure and one of Americas best and most beloved writers”. (Author Unknown) “He was, at the very least, already a double creature. He wanted to belong but he also wanted to laugh from the outside”. (Kaplan)
  • 10. MARK TWAIN With each book Twain focused on a multitude of things here’s a few examples. Huckleberry Finn: was written in the aftermath of Reconstruction after the Civil War. He used realistic language in this novel. Life on the Mississippi: describes the history, sights, people, and legends of the steamboats and towns of the Mississippi River region. The Tragedy of Pudd’n Head Wilson: Twain focused on racial prejudice as the most critical issue facing American society.
  • 11. HIS FINAL CHAPTER As his career cultivated, he seemed to become more and more removed from the humorous, cocky image of his younger days. Twain Died: April 21, 1910 in Redding, Connecticut of a heart disease He left behind numerous unpublished manuscripts, including his large but incomplete autobiography.
  • 12. WORKS CITED:Craven, Jackie. The Mark Twain House. About.com. 2007. New York Times Co. http://architecture.about.com/od/housetours/ig/Mark-Twain- House/Mark-Twain-House.-0ia.htmGarland, Hamlin. NAR. June 1910. p. 833Kaplan, Justin. Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain (Simon). 1966. p.18Leninger, Phillip., Perkins, Barbara., Perkins, George. Benet’s Readers Encyclopedia of American Literature. 1991. Harper Collins Publisher.Mark Twain. 2011. A & E Television Networks., http://www.history.com/topics/mark-twain