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  • Session To Do’s:
  • Review the night’s agenda
  • Read the PT Roles
  • Read the Accountable Talk Roles
  • Have PT’s whose names appear on the slides read the Key Messages and be responsible for how the session activities connect to those messages throughout the session.
  • Have PT’s whose names appear on the slides read the Key Messages and be responsible for how the session activities connect to those messages throughout the session.
  • Have PT’s whose names appear on the slides read the Key Messages and be responsible for how the session activities connect to those messages throughout the session.
  • Have PT’s read the Objectives next to their names…
  • Tell the PT’s that this activity will allow them to receive feedback on the pretest they administered for homework before they administer it to their students before next session.EXPLAIN: The reviewer will examine the pretest and give general feedback as well as specific feedback on the following: Standards alignment to content expecationsStandards alignment to cognitive expectationsAlignment to state or textbook test or released itemsTagged questions based on standardsPT’s will write their feedback on Handout 3.1. After 5 minutes, ask that pre-tests be returned and provide PT”s with opportunity to review and ask for clarification on the feedback.Direct PT”s to list revisions they will make before administering the test under the box labeled “REVISION PLAN”.
  • Tell the PT’s that they will meet in these same strategy groups every time they do the strategy implementation routine. Also try to keep the sheets in an organized fashion for an analysis for Session 15.
  • Have PT’s read the Objectives next to their names…
  • Tell PT’s: Now you will be led in an experience to help you appreciate the importance of addressing math in the secondary science classroom.
  • Tell PT’s: Now you will complete an anticipation guide about scientific inquiry, which we learned about in Session 3. Later in the session, you’ll be directed to return to this anticipation guide to respond again to each of the statements, using the 3rd column.
  • Ask a PT to read and mention how they currently apply this in practice.
  • You’ll now spend 5 minutes synthesizing the value of inquiry as spelled out in the summary of the text, “Making the Case for Inquiry”. Handout 4.20 (HW)Refer to the 3 charts around the room and explain that PT’s will have the opportunity to take on the role of defending inquiry-based science education, using the research they read about for HW.
  • Tell PT’s they will now examine their science content standards for mathematical concepts and skills and plan to survey their students’ abilities to tackle conceptual, computational and problem-solving aspects of their science courses. Please write large enough so everyone can see.
  • Ask a PT to read and mention how they currently apply this in practice.
  • Tell PT’s that now we will delve into the nature of science by experiencing an inquiry based activity.
  • Tell PT’s that now we will delve into the nature of science by experiencing an inquiry based activity.Tell PT’s that they will practice writing observations for this demonstration in a similar manner to how students write observations in a science lab notebook during a demonstration or investigation.
  • Tell PT’s that in the next section, they will analyze one of the classroom scenarios they read for homework to determine necessary components fro classroom inquiry.
  • Have PT’s read the Objectives next to their names…
  • Tell PT’s: Now you will be led in an experience to help you appreciate the importance of addressing math in the secondary science classroom.
  • Tell PT’s that while inquiry is the best approach, it may be different from how we learned it. Hands on inquiry engages students in formulating original questions, brainstorming to find answers, and critically evaluating subsequent test results. Tell PT’s they will now examine science classroom scenarios to identify the different components and levels of inquiry-based science instruction.
  • Tell PT’s that while inquiry is the best approach, it may be different from how we learned it. Hands on inquiry engages students in formulating original questions, brainstorming to find answers, and critically evaluating subsequent test results. Tell PT’s they will now examine science classroom scenarios to identify the different components and levels of inquiry-based science instruction.
  • Tell PT”s now that you’ve had the opportunity to examine the different levels of inquiry, we’ll now take a look at how our curricular resources treat the different levels of inquiry.
  • Ask a PT to share how considering the science process skills in the content domain to evaluate the curriculum informs their instruction?
  • You will explore the scenarios, ask questions, compare and contrast the instruction and levels of inquiry in the reading to their own and identify effective activities in the scenario that allow for a solid inquiry-based lesson.
  • Tell PT”s we’ll now take a Gallery Walk of Inquiry-Based Science Classrooms.
  • Tell PT”s we’ll now take a Gallery Walk of Inquiry-Based Science Classrooms.
  • Ask a PT to read and mention how they currently apply this in practice.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now discuss and determine the tools for assessing students’ science process skills.
  • Have PT’s read the Objectives next to their names…
  • Tell PT’s: Now you will be led in an experience to help you appreciate the importance of addressing math in the secondary science classroom.
  • Ask a PT to read and mention how they currently apply this in practice.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now discuss and determine the tools for assessing students’ science process skills.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now learn about the measures you will use for monitoring progress in the scientific inquiry skills.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now learn about the measures you will use for monitoring progress in the scientific inquiry skills.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now learn about the measures you will use for monitoring progress in the scientific inquiry skills.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now score a sample lab report on Handout 5.9
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now learn about the measures you will use for monitoring progress in the scientific inquiry skills.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now practice scoring another lab report, “Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Enzymes of the Liver” on Handout 5.11. skills.
  • Ask a PT to read and mention how they currently apply this in practice.
  • TRANSITION:Tell the PT’s they will now practice scoring another lab report, “Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Enzymes of the Liver” on Handout 5.11. skills.
  • Have PT’s read the Objectives next to their names…

Session 5 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Welcome to the PGPTP Secondary Science Session Dawn Berkeley, Seminar LeaderDo Now: Please complete the sheets fromthe DC office contained in your FeedbackFolder. (white half-sheet)
  • 2. Professional Values Focus on our primary mission of closing the achievement gap by setting high expectations for our students, our colleagues and ourselves. Maximize our experience – working with a sense of urgency, seeking out and welcoming experiences, resources, and feedback in order to grow. Be flexible. Respect one another. Model a Culture of Achievement.
  • 3. Group Norms Be respectful of one another No side conversations Arrive on time and prepared for class Keep all cell phones off during session. Focus on things within your control No war stories…limit dwelling (whining or complaining) No blame or excuses No interrupting Take ownership of the session by actively participating
  • 4. So, what’s different? 2nd Year Completion Requirements: Requirement #1 – Assessment Projects (5) 1. Professional Development Plan 2. Aligning Strategies to Content Requirements & Student Needs 3. Analyzing Content, Standards, and Resources 4. Diagnosing Student Readiness, Setting Achievement Goals and Monitoring Progress – Part 1 5. Diagnosing Student Readiness, Setting Achievement Goals and Monitoring Progress – Part 1 Requirement #2 – Updated PES Component 4 – “Setting Goals for Student Achievement and Professional Development” Requirement #3 – Improving Practice Analysis and Reflection (5 – 7 pg. reflection)
  • 5. AgendaTime Section Activity5:00 – 5:15 p.m. Opening Strategy Debrief5:15 – 5:50 p.m. Section 1 The Inquiry Approach and the Nature of Science5:50 – 6:45 p.m. Section 2 Defining Inquiry Based Science6:45 – 6:55 p.m. Break6:55 – 7:50 p.m Section 3 The Inquiry Process: A Review and Rubrics for Scientific Investigations7:50 – 8:00 p.m. Closing Reflection
  • 6. PT Roles  Key Keeper: This person makes connections to Course Goals, Competencies and Key Messages.  Time Keepers: This person will keep time for a section of our session. The section will be noted by the number on the clock.  Judges: This person explains how this session relates to how we are being assessed as educators. Their responsibility is to make connections from the day’s session to the assignments and assessment projects  Town Criers: This person provides encouragement/shout outs to the group. Shout outs should be aligned to the session norms determined during the orientation session.  Session Scribe: This person will be responsible for writing up any related feedback from debriefs..
  • 7. Accountable Talk Roles MARKING: This person directs the group’s attention to the importance of a person’s contribution. Why is what was said important? CHALLENGING: This person redirects a question back to the person. PIGGYBACKING: This person adds to someone else’s thinking. I agree because _____. I think another reason is _________. SUMMARIZING: This person summarizes the point of another person. LINKING CONTRIBUTIONS: This person makes explicit the relationship between a new contribution and what was said before.
  • 8. CONTENT Each of the core subjects you teach has a unique organizational structure,It is your responsibility vocabulary, and requirements.to understand deeply Understanding these elements will helpthe content you teach you make connections for yourin order to make students between skills andlearning meaningful to knowledge, as well as within and between content areas. Most important,all students. you will be able to help your students generalize and apply knowledge to new and complex academic tasks.
  • 9. ASSESSMENT You will need to monitor student progress carefully, critically analyze results, and make immediate and careful changes to your own teaching practices in order to achieveAssessment is a key measurable progress in studentcomponent to closing performance. You need to understand how to select effective assessments so that you canthe achievement gap. continuously document student progressTeachers need to use toward meeting or exceeding grade-levelongoing assessments standards by the end of the school year.to be highly effective You will invest students in their academicin the classroom. development by being transparent about their performance, sharing results, and providing them with the ongoing assessment tools they need to understand and drive their own academic success.
  • 10. INSTRUCTION Your instructional choices should support student mastery of standards, be informed by student achievementTeachers must choose data, and be differentiated to meetinstructional strategies student needs. This will help ensurecarefully to maximize that your efforts in the classroom will lead toward the academictheir impact on student achievement for every student. Yourachievement. curriculum is a tool, but whether your students make gains is up to you. No curriculum on its own will be effective for all students.
  • 11. Session Objectives ANALYZE and evaluate the importance of science process skills to clarify science standards related to inquiry and investigation and to create a science classroom that values inquiry. (Joseph) ANALYZE how participants can create a scientific community in their classroom with high-quality scientific inquiry experiences. (Dani) DEVELOP criteria for assessing science process skills using a set of rubrics (Ardalan)
  • 12. Opening Strategy Debrief KEY KEEPER DO NOW: Take out Handouts 4.11 and 4.12: Math Strategy Implementation Planning/Reflection Sheet. Review your work and prepare to discuss your reflection with your strategy groups. Group 1: Kevin, Alexis, Dani Group 2: Joseph, Ardalan
  • 13. Opening Strategy Debrief KEY KEEPERStrategy Implementation Routine Groups: NOW: Refer to Handouts 5.1. Ingroups, please complete the StrategyDebrief. Be prepared to share with thegroup. * You will be using all of your instructional strategy implementation planning/reflection sheets for Session 15, so it would be a good to keep them organized. Literacy & Math Strategy Sheets.13 min.
  • 14. Session Objectives ANALYZE and evaluate the importance of science process skills to clarify science standards related to inquiry and investigation and to create a science classroom that values inquiry. (Joseph) ANALYZE how participants can create a scientific community in their classroom with high-quality scientific inquiry experiences. (Dani) DEVELOP criteria for assessing science process skills using a set of rubrics (Ardalan)
  • 15. Section 1 The Inquiry Approach and the Nature of Science Prior Knowledge on Inquiry Making the Case for Inquiry The Nature of Science
  • 16. Prior Knowledge on Inquiry DO NOW: Refer to Handouts 5.2 -Anticipation Guide on InquiryOnly complete the column labeled,“Agree/Disagree” at this time. 3 min.
  • 17. Prior Knowledge on Inquiry Research also has shown that effective learning happens only when the learner applies new knowledge analytically and does not merely memorize it. Incorporating new knowledge intoone’s cognitive foundation allows learning to be long lasting.
  • 18. Making the Case for Inquiry DO NOW: Refer to Handouts 4.20 - “Makingthe Case for Inquiry” and Handout 4.19. How does the note-taking device on Handout 4.19 support student comprehension?Do you see any variations of this note-taking deviceand/or how would do you see yourself using this with your students?
  • 19. Making the Case for Inquiry DO NOW:• Based on the colored dot on your folder you will go to an assigned chart. Please take Handouts 4.19 and 4.20 with you.• Read the statement on the chart, then discuss and list on the chart counterarguments to the statement.*• Then select one member of the group to share out their defense of the inquiry approach with the rest of the group. 10 min.
  • 20. Making the Case for Inquiry“Teachers must choose instructional strategies carefully to maximize their impact on student achievement.” INSTRUCTION
  • 21. Making the Case for Inquiry• In what ways does the inquiry based approach maximize learning?• With that in mind, why should teachers guide/scaffold inquiry?
  • 22. The Nature of ScienceMaterials:
  • 23. The Nature of ScienceDO NOW: Using Handout 5.3 work with a partner to complete the lab protocol found at the lab stations. 12 min.
  • 24. The Nature of Science• How was the list of “scientist work” exemplified in the demo lab?• Any other examples of “scientist work” not mentioned?• What would careful facilitation of inquiry involve?
  • 25. Session Objectives (SMART Sheets – Feedback Folder) ANALYZE and evaluate the importance of science process skills to clarify science standards related to inquiry and investigation and to create a science classroom that values inquiry. (Joseph) ANALYZE how participants can create a scientific community in their classroom with high-quality scientific inquiry experiences. (Dani) DEVELOP criteria for assessing science process skills using a set of rubrics (Ardalan)
  • 26. Section 2 Defining Inquiry-Based Science Levels of Inquiry Characteristics of Inquiry Gallery Walk and Discussion
  • 27. Levels of InquiryDO NOW: Using Handout 5.4  Individually read the descriptions of the levels of inquiry (Chart 1) and then describe each investigation example described in Handout 5.4 (Chart 2).  Discuss with a neighbor the differences between each level. 4 Levels of Inquiry: • Confirmation • Structured Inquiry • Guided Inquiry • Open Inquiry • What are each of the levels of inquiry based on?
  • 28. Levels of InquiryTo think about:• What steps need to be considered when implementing successful inquiry-based lessons at each level?• Based on your assigned level, what is one consideration for inquiry based lessons?
  • 29. Levels of InquiryThink about and share with a partner:• In your practice, how do you support your students in group work?• What are some of the benefits to collaborative work in science? Video• Case Studies in Science• How do you encourage self-monitoring during group work?• Be prepared to share one suggestion for structuring and implementing effective group work.
  • 30. Levels of InquiryDO NOW: Locate Handout 5.4 Take out the curricular resource you were to bring in Select one key concept from your standards (related to science process skills) and evaluate the treatment of this standard in your curricular resource.
  • 31. Levels of Inquiry“Your curriculum is a tool, but whether your students make gains is up to you.” INSTRUCTION
  • 32. Characteristics of InquiryDO NOW: Locate Handout 4.17 Get into groups based upon the class scenario you chose to read. In groups, you will use an inquiry-based approach to observe and examine the science classroom scenarios and using Handout 4.18 you will complete Handout 4.17.
  • 33. Levels of InquiryDO NOW: As a group, you will write down the teacher behaviors (for the selected reading) on a pink post-it note and the student behaviors on the blue post-it. note. Teacher behaviors
  • 34. Organize and name Levels of InquiryDO NOW: Organize the sticky notes into groups of like behaviors on the provided chart paper. Ex: “use timer”, “measure the length of the worm, and “weigh each bowl of water”. This would be labeled as “measuring”. Teacher behaviors 10 min.
  • 35. Levels of Inquiry (Debrief)Benefits of the last strategy? How could you see thisused in your class? Teacher behaviors
  • 36. Gallery Walk and DiscussionDO NOW: You will now take a Gallery Walk from poster to poster with your groups making observations of the thinking behind the labeled groups on the posters. Take notes on Handout 4.17 during the walk. Sit with your min. discuss and reflect on the 5 groups, questions on Handout 5.5. Be prepared to share. 5 min. 10 min.
  • 37. Gallery Walk and Discussion Debrief • Based on examination of the classroom scenarios, what are the essential components of inquiry-based science classrooms? • In the classroom scenarios, how did the teacher involve genuine scientific inquiry for her students? What levels of inquiry did you notice? • How did the teacher address student preconceptions as well as learning for understanding? • How did this activity allowed for an inquiry-based experience to the work of a scientist? (Chart)3 min.
  • 38. Gallery Walk and Discussion Debrief “Teachers must choose instructional strategies carefully to maximize their impact on student achievement.”How do teachersstrategically implementinquiry so as todifferentiate instructionand maximize science INSTRUCTIONlearning?
  • 39. Revisiting the Anticipation Guide How or in what ways have we experienced inquiry tonight?DO NOW: Please revisit the Anticipation Guide on Handout 5.2 and record any changes in your thinking about inquiry in Column 3 “I Now Agree/Disagree” with justification in Column 4. Check for Understanding
  • 40. Session Objectives ANALYZE and evaluate the importance of science process skills to clarify science standards related to inquiry and investigation and to create a science classroom that values inquiry. (Joseph) ANALYZE how participants can create a scientific community in their classroom with high-quality scientific inquiry experiences. (Dani) DEVELOP criteria for assessing science process skills using a set of rubrics (Ardalan)
  • 41. 10 min.
  • 42. Section 3 The Inquiry Process: A Review and Rubrics for Scientific Investigatiosn A Review of the Inquiry Process Introduction to the Scoring Rubric Practice Using the Scoring Rubrics
  • 43. A Review of the Inquiry Process “Assessment is a key component to closing the achievement gap.”“Teachers need to use ongoing assessments to be highly effective in the classroom?” What are some ways assessment is a key component to closing the achievement gap? ASSESSMENT
  • 44. A Review of the Inquiry Process Inquiry Process Diagram
  • 45. A Review of the Inquiry ProcessDO NOW: Turn to Handout 5.6 “Overview of Inquiry Process for This Course” and read the introduction. What is a benefit of analyzing only 20 students? You will be creating a data tracker for HW to track your students’ development. (Handout 5.13) Session 6  analyze and grade a lab report using a rubric
  • 46. Introduction to the Scoring RubricWhat you will do: * Create an overview of the components of a lab investigation and brainstorm criteria for for each lab component. * Compare your criteria with the rubric criteria * Use the rubric with any modifications to score a sample lab report.DO NOW: Turn to Handout 5.7 you will use what you know to brainstorm criteria for each of the components of a lab investigation.
  • 47. Introduction to the Scoring RubricDO NOW: Turn to Handout 5.7 and write your comparisons and questions in Column 3. The 4 lab report rubrics can be found on Handout 5.8. There are 2 rubrics: * For both HS/MS, one rubric reflects beginning/end of the year expectations * 2 middle school rubrics 5 min.
  • 48. Introduction to the Scoring RubricWould all of the criteria apply to every inquiry-basedlearning experience in your classroom?In what ways would you modify the rubrics or are theyacceptable in their current form?Which of the science process skills would not beevident in a written lab report? How else could theseprocess skills be assessed?
  • 49. Introduction to the Scoring RubricDO NOW: You will now score a sample lab report on Handout 5.9 using Lab Report Rubric: High School End of Year from Handout 5.8. Work in groups to do the following: • For each rubric component, discuss and determine which criteria are met by the student lab report and highlight with a highlighter. • Determine the score on a scale of 1 – 4 for each component. Please write this in Column 3 on Handout 5.10. 7 min.
  • 50. Practice Using the Scoring RubricsDO NOW: Turn to Handout 5.11. Using the High School End-of-Year Rubric, please score the lab report independently for later comparison with the group. Upon completion, please record the scores on Handout 5.12. 3 min.
  • 51. Practice Using the Scoring Rubric “Assessment is a key component to closing the achievement gap.” “Teachers need to use ongoing assessments to be highly effective in the classroom?”How can rubrics for labreports help you to What modificationsdesign effective might you make to theinstruction? criteria based on YOUR How can using rubrics students? help you to invest your students in their own science process skill development? ASSESSMENT
  • 52. Practice Using the Scoring RubricsTO CONSIDER: Remember: • By Session 6  you will have assigned and graded a lab report using the rubrics for one of your classes. • Enter your students’ scores for each component in the data tracker Handout 5.13/Handout 5.14 • * An electronic template is available via: www.tfresources.org
  • 53. Closing Reflection/Homework Please return to your SMART Objective sheets and complete the prompts provided. Homework:  Assign students to conduct an investigative lab activity and write a lab report  Score the lab reports using the rubrics provided  Complete a data tracker similar to that on Handout 5.14 with scores from lab reports  Bring the completed lab reports to Session 6 for analysis  Preview the data analysis reports and steps in Session 6 by reading: Handouts 6.2, 6.3a, 6.5a, 6.7a  Administer the content knowledge Post test before Session 7 and bring the data to Session 7
  • 54. Session Objectives ANALYZE and evaluate the importance of science process skills to clarify science standards related to inquiry and investigation and to create a science classroom that values inquiry. (Joseph) ANALYZE how participants can create a scientific community in their classroom with high-quality scientific inquiry experiences. (Dani) DEVELOP criteria for assessing science process skills using a set of rubrics (Ardalan)
  • 55. Instructional & Grouping Strategies Sentence Strip Activity Three Views