228600-114300Prince George’s County Practitioner Teacher Program<br />Secondary Science<br />Teaching for Results Course S...
Portfolio Evaluation System Guidelines
www.TfRresources.org - includes writable versions of handouts from the Participant Manual, as well as web links mentioned ...
Course Blog:   HYPERLINK "http://pgptp.blogspot.com/" http://pgptp.blogspot.com/
TeacherTrack Participant Portal: https://dc.teachertrack2.org/. Submit work products; access attendance records and work p...
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final
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2011 tf r science syllabus md 2nd year sped only.final

  1. 1. 228600-114300Prince George’s County Practitioner Teacher Program<br />Secondary Science<br />Teaching for Results Course Syllabus – <br />2nd Year Maryland <br />Special Education Participants<br />Seminar Leader: Dawn Berkeley<br />Phone: 240.342.0658 <br />Email: dawn.berkeley@pgcps.org (*Email is the preferred mode of contact.) <br />Seminar Location: Parkdale High School -- 6001 Good Luck Road Riverdale, MD 20737 – Room 122 <br />To locate Room 122, walk down the hall way located to the right of the main office. Immediately make a right down the first hallway (you will notice a green ramp). Continue down the hall until the last intersecting hallway and make a left. Room 122 will be located on your right and is the only room on this side of the hallway.  <br />Course Resources:<br /><ul><li>Teaching for Results Secondary Science Participant Manual
  2. 2. Portfolio Evaluation System Guidelines
  3. 3. www.TfRresources.org - includes writable versions of handouts from the Participant Manual, as well as web links mentioned in the Participant Manual.
  4. 4. Course Blog: HYPERLINK "http://pgptp.blogspot.com/" http://pgptp.blogspot.com/
  5. 5. TeacherTrack Participant Portal: https://dc.teachertrack2.org/. Submit work products; access attendance records and work product feedback; view program messages.</li></ul>Meeting Dates and Times<br />Sessions will be held approximately every other Wednesday from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. <br />SessionDateOrientation Session8/31/11Session 19/14/11Session 29/28/11Session 310/12/11Session 410/26/11Session 511/9/11Session 611/30/11Session 712/14/11Session 81/18/12Session 92/1/12Session 102/15/12Session 112/29/12Session 123/14/12Session 133/28/12Session 144/18/12Session 155/2/12<br />Remember that you may not miss more than 2 sessions and it is important to arrive on time. Missing 5-15 minutes of a session (arriving late or leaving early) is considered a tardy; three tardies constitute one absence. Missing more than 15 minutes of any part of the session (including arriving late or leaving early) is considered an absence.<br />Expectations:<br />Please carefully read your Program Handbook and adhere to the policies and professional values described within, including the following expectations related to professional values.<br /> <br />As your facilitator, I expect you to:<br />arrive on time and prepared for class, with all assignments completed<br />keep all cell phones off during the session<br />focus on the session and participate fully in all activities<br />come to class with a positive attitude – focus discussions around issues that we can control<br />As a participant in my seminar, you may expect me to:<br />begin and end class on time<br />be prepared and well-organized<br />follow the agenda and lead the group to reach the session objectives<br />give you timely feedback on assignments<br />be available to assist you with individual concerns outside of class hours<br />be reached by email or phone and respond to you within 24 - 48 hours (usually much sooner).<br />Work Products and Other Assignments:<br />In your first year of coursework, you successfully completed the Portfolio Evaluation System, a culminating project wherein you demonstrated proficiency in the three course competencies of content, assessment, and instruction, as related to your coursework in Special Education. This year, to be recommended for certification, you must also demonstrate your competence as teachers of specific subject matter within a special education context. While you will not submit an another portfolio exhibiting a body of work from your second year of teaching experience, you will be required to complete the Assessment Projects in the course, as usual, and then to submit two additional components to demonstrate your development as teachers capable of using data to plan and deliver instruction to all students, including those with special needs, within a specific content area.<br />You will have multiple tasks to complete for each session. Some will be submitted to your seminar leader for formal evaluation and grades (we refer to those as “work products”), while others will need to be completed in order to participate in the seminar session. The list below details due dates for ALL work products and other homework for the course. In addition to the work products, you will submit three of the homework assignments to Seminar Leaders for informal feedback to ensure you are on track to be successful in the seminar.<br />Work products (assessment projects and the final portfolio) and assignments that must be submitted to your seminar leader are indicated with a * in the table below. Work products should be submitted via TeacherTrack prior to the start of the session: https://dc.teachertrack2.org/. <br />You can access electronic versions of the assignment handouts as well as web links and other resources by going to www.TfRresources.org. <br /><ul><li>SessionAssignment DescriptionDate DueOrientation SessionOrientation Session Objectives:Analyze course goals and related competencies and routines to clarify outcomes for the course.Articulate how course assessments enable participants to demonstrate mastery of the course goals and competencies.Describe connections between lesson and unit planning and the benefit of ensuring alignment between the two.Solve common obstacles to maintaining a focus on student achievement in the classroom.Assignment DescriptionDate DuePES Component #1 (Informal Feedback)Revise your original version of PES Component #1: Setting the Stage to fit your current teaching setting. The purpose of this portfolio component is to provide context for the achievement gap that exists in your school and classroom as well as the resources available to your students this year and to provide context on your teaching position that your SL may use to ensure that the seminar is rigorous and relevant to your teaching situation.Session 1Gathering ResourcesPurchase or download and print a copy of the National Science Education Standards. You may also download them and access them via laptop during the session. These will be used throughout the course and should be brought to every session. The standards can be downloaded at the National Academies Press website (http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=4962) or through TfR Online Resources at www.tfrresources.org.For one course taught, gather the following:■ State standards■ Syllabus■ Course pacing guide or calendar■ Textbook or other curriculum resourceSession 1Article ReadingRead Handout 1.3 and mark as directed.Read Handout 1.4.Session 11Session 1: Introduction to Secondary ScienceObjectives:Identify the various components of the secondary science content domain.Define the science teacher’s role in facilitating student inquiry and ensuring safety in the lab environment.Analyze both state standards and the National Science Education Standards for specific science courses and relate them to the science content domain (concerning both content and skill).Analyze curricular resources and begin designing a strategy for using them to plan instruction in relation to standards and the content domain.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Work Product: Assessment Project: Analyzing Content, Standards, and Resources*See the full description of the Analyzing Content, Standards, and Resources Assessment Project at the end of this syllabus for directions and materials to submit. Session 2Article reading in preparation for next sessionRead Handout 2.3 and be ready to discuss the role of science content as well as science process skills in Session 2.Read Handout 2.7 and answer the questions following the article. NOTE: reflection questions are available on Handout 2.7 on TfRresources.org.Session 2Planning for science content assessmentBring in planning resources for a unit that will be taught between Sessions 4 and 7.Bring standardized test items related to the unit from your textbook or local assessments.Session 22Session 2: Teaching and Assessing Content and VocabularyObjective:Use self-assessment of science content knowledge and pedagogy to set professional goals for teaching science.Identify the importance of fundamental science content and vocabulary.Explore methods to assess student proficiency and develop the foundation to create a pretest that will guide unit planning and formatively modify instruction.Assignment DescriptionDate DueCreate a pretestFollow the parameters on Handout 2.11 to create a pretest for a unit that you will teach between Sessions 4 and 7 and bring it to Session 3. Plan to administer it before Session 4 and then administer it as a posttest at the end of the unit, before Session 7.Bring back the standardized test questions from which you formatted your pretest for discussion.Select one class of at least 20 students to take the assessment and be the focus of this “mini-inquiry process.”Session 3*Initial Professional Goals Growth Plan (Informal Feedback)*Set three goals to accomplish this year through your work as a science teacher and complete Handout 2.2 using the criteria below.Professional Goals CriteriaThe goals are SMART.The goals are driven by the self-assessment data.The stated goals help participant meet course competencies.The action steps and time frame are clearly defined.The action steps are logical.The action steps will support participant in achieving the stated goals.Session 2Article readingRead Handouts 3.10 and 3.11 as background for the role of writing and literacy in the sciences and take notes as directed.Session 33Session 3: Literacy in ScienceObjectives:Articulate how science incorporates discrete knowledge as well as academic skills.Evaluate the literacy skills necessary to comprehend science and science texts and define role in assisting students with accessing text.Apply strategies for comprehending science.Evaluate, select, and plan to implement comprehension strategies.Assignment DescriptionDate DueAdminister pre-test to one classAdminister the pretest of science content to one class of at least twenty students. Document student results from pretest using the data tracker (Handouts 4.13b and 4.14b) and bring a printout or electronic copy.Review Handouts 4.13a and 4.14a for examples of how to complete the data tracker handouts.Session 4* Work Product: Strategy Implementation and Reflection #1 - Science Literacy (Informal Feedback) *Complete the planning sheet on Handout 3.17 and implement the strategy.Complete the reflection on Handout 3.18, and be ready to discuss.Implementation Planning Sheets CriteriaThe content objective is aligned to standards.The content objective is realistic and ambitious for the target student(s), given their current skill level.The participant clearly articulates how this lesson is connected to a larger unit.The strategy focus supports the content standard.The formative assessment aligns to the objective.There is a clear plan to involve students in assessing their own progress.The time frame for implementation is realistic.The steps provided give a thorough overview of the lesson.The participant has considered all of the necessary steps to implement this strategy.The teaching approach will be effective with students.The participant clearly articulates why this strategy is a good fit to increase student achievement.The participant’s planning has been detailed in a way that will maximize implementation.Reflection Sheet CriteriaParticipant provides sufficient evidence that indicates whether students met objectives.Participant provides a thoughtful analysis of the implementation of the strategy.Participant clearly articulates any trends in the objectives students met or did not meet.Participant implemented effective assessment measures to determine whether students met objectives.Participant articulates clear next steps that will ensure all targeted students meet objectives.Proposed modifications are logical.Proposed modifications will increase effectiveness of lesson.Session 4Analysis of curriculum in relation to reading and writingUse what you have learned about the literacy demands of the science content domain, and the benefits of writing to enhance thinking, to analyze your textbook or other curriculum resource for its literacy supports and demands. Complete Handout 3.19. This is part of the content domain routine.Session 44Session 4: Mathematics in ScienceObjectives:Examine the mathematics skills necessary to comprehend science concepts and define the science teacher’s role in supporting students’ math skills.Define the expected level of mathematics performance prescribed in the standards and determine appropriate solutions for modifying or scaffolding instruction when math skills needed for science exceed student level.Evaluate, select, and plan to implement strategies for teaching the math skills necessary to understand science concepts.Analyze content pre-assessment data to inform unit planning.Assignment DescriptionDate DueImplementation of instructional support regarding student math skillsBegin implementation of the plan to support math skills in science on Handout 4.4.Session 5*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #2 - Math Strategy *Complete the planning sheet on Handout 4.11 and implement the strategy.Complete the reflection on Handout 4.12, and be ready to discuss.Session 5Planning instructional support for students based on pre-test dataFinish planning in response to pretest data on Handout 4.16 and prepare to administer a post-test before Session 7.Session 7Article readingRead either of the articles on Handout 4.18 and take notes on Handout 4.17.Read Handout 4.20 and describe elements of science inquiry on Handout 4.19.Session 5Planning for implementation of lab investigationIn the next session you will examine science process skills and lab investigation rubrics. Bring a curricular resource, such as the teacher’s edition for the textbook you use, and bring teaching resources such as your syllabus, lesson plan book/calendar, science standards, and a highlighter to help in planning the evaluation of a lab investigation.Session 5Session 5: Introduction to Inquiry-Based Science InstructionObjectives:Analyze and evaluate the importance of science process skills to clarify science standards related to inquiry and investigation and to create a science classroom that values inquiry.Analyze how participants can create a scientific community in their classroom with high-quality scientific inquiry experiences.Develop criteria for assessing science process skills using a set of rubrics.Assignment DescriptionDate Due5*Work Product – Assessment Project: Aligning Strategies to Content Requirements and Student Needs*See the full description of the Aligning Strategies to Content Requirements and Student Needs Assessment Project for directions and materials to submit.Session 6Evaluating lab investigations and science process skillsAssign your students to conduct a lab investigation and write a lab report.Score the lab reports using rubrics provided by this course. Use highlighters or another method to show the criteria the lab reports meet for each process skill on the rubric.Record scores on your data tracker (Handout 5.14), and bring a printout or electronic copy of it to Session 6.Bring in 1-2 sample lab investigations and highlighted student rubrics to discuss.Session 6Data analysis on science process skillsPreview the data analysis reports and steps by reviewing the samples on Handouts 6.2, 6.3a, 6.5a, and 6.7a.Session 6Administer post-test to one classAdminister the post-test prior to Session 7 and bring in post-test data with analysis to Session 7Session 76Session 6: Using data to Inform InstructionObjectives:Use individual student diagnostic data to identify trends in science process skills.Create end-of-course goals and intermediary benchmarks for subgroups of students.Create a teaching plan for subgroups of students to develop science process skills.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Work Product – Assessment Project: Diagnosing Student Readiness, Part I.Finish setting goals on Handouts 6.5b.Finish teaching plan for all groups on Handout 6.7b.See the full description of the Diagnosing Student Readiness Assessment Project at the end of this syllabus for directions and materials to submit.Session 7Evaluating second lab investigations and science process skills Set a date to assign your students to conduct a second lab investigation and write a lab report in time to bring results to Session 9.Session 9Administer science content post-testAdminister the post-test for your unit to the same class as the pre-test.Record scores on the data tracker and bring a printout or electronic copy of Handouts 7.11b and 7.12b.Bring teaching resources to plan instructional support for students.Session 7Review Professional Growth Goals for Teaching ScienceBring your self-assessment and professional growth goals for teaching science on Handouts 2.1 and 2.2 and be prepared to discuss your progress in the next session.Session 7Prepare to uncover and redirect misconceptionsIf instructed to watch the video A Private Universe for homework, access the video from the link on www.TfRresourcces.org and take notes as instructed on Handout 7.1.Session 77Session 7: Misconceptions in ScienceObjectives:Explore misconceptions in science and the strategies that uncover student preconceptions, redirect student understanding, and teach for conceptual change.Examine and select effective strategies for teaching students to ask questions about the material world. Evaluate content assessment results to make strategic decisions about reteaching.Reassess content domain knowledge and compare to first self-assessment.Assignment DescriptionDate DueCreating a teaching plan for students based on data from the post-testComplete the plan on Handout 7.14b and begin implementation of the plan.Session 8*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #3 - Asking Questions * Complete the planning and reflection sheets on Handouts 7.9 and 7.10.Session 8*Work Product - Assessment Project: Creating a Professional Development Plan*See the full description of the Creating a Professional Development Plan Assessment Project at the end of this syllabus for directions and materials to submit.Session 8Article readingRead Handout 8.2 and complete Handout 8.3 on unifying concepts.Session 8Evaluating second lab investigations and science process skillsIf you have not already done so, assign your students to conduct a second lab investigation and write a lab report. Prior to Session 9 score the report using the rubrics.Session 98Session 8: Form and FunctionObjectives:Analyze the unifying concept of form and function.Build a continuum showing how topics within the unifying concept of form and function develop in the standards in each major discipline (life, earth, and physical science) across the secondary grades, noting where related topics are introduced, developed, and mastered.Identify common misconceptions about form and function, hypothesize places within the curriculum where these misconceptions may have developed, and develop strategies for teaching content in a way that corrects misconceptions.Examine and select effective strategies for teaching students to plan investigations.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #4 - Planning Investigations*Complete the planning and reflection sheets on Handouts 8.14 and 8.15.Session 9Evaluating second lab investigations and science process skillsCollect lab reports from the second investigative activity you assigned after creating the teaching plan in Session 6.Score the lab reports using rubrics provided by this course, using a highlighter or other method to highlight criteria met.Bring a printout or electronic copy of your data tracker, teaching plan (Handout 6.7b), sample lab reports and graded rubrics for selected students to discuss.Select students who need intensive support. For these students, bring samples of student work, including their lab reports, with the rubrics.Session 99Session 9: Evaluation Instructional EffectivenessObjectives:Collaboratively analyze second set of lab report data and teaching plan to determine its effectiveness in moving students toward end-of-year goals.Respond to data by creating new teaching plan and/or developing differentiated instruction and intervention for the next six weeks.Reflect on effectiveness of scientific process skills and lab experiences in the classroom to share best practices and identify changes needed in structure, management, and delivery of strategy instruction.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Work Product – Assessment Project: Diagnosing Student Readiness, Part 2Complete Handout 9.4b and the respond plan on Handout 9.8b.Begin implementation of science process skills respond plan.See the full description of the Diagnosing Student Readiness Assessment Project (Part 2) at the end of the syllabus for directions and materials to submit.Submit Respond Plan by Session 10; Implement plan by Session 12.Evaluating third lab investigation and science process skillsAssign your students to conduct a third lab investigation and write a lab report before Session 12.Session 12Article readingRead resources cited on Handout 10.1a related to descriptions of unifying concepts and complete the handout.Session 10Preview unifying conceptsComplete Handout 10.4a and 10.4b with standards, topics, and misconceptions related to the unifying concepts of change, constancy, and measurement and evolution and equilibrium.Session 1010Session 10: Change, Constancy, and Measurement and Evolution and EquilibriumObjectives:Analyze the unifying concepts of change, constancy, and measurement and evolution and equilibrium.Build a continuum showing how these concepts develop in the standards.Identify common misconceptions about change, constancy, and measurement and evolution and equilibrium, hypothesize places within the curriculum where these misconceptions may have developed, and develop strategies for correcting misconceptions.Examine and select effective strategies for teaching students to conduct investigations.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #5 - Conducting Investigations *Complete the planning and reflection sheets on Handouts 10.13 and 10.14.Session 11Article readingRead Handout 11.2 and take notes as directed on the handout.Session 11Preview unifying conceptComplete Handout 11.5 with standards, topics, and misconceptions related to the unifying concepts of systems, order, and organization.Session 11Preparing to administer third lab investigation and science process skills assessmentIf you have not already done so, assign your students to conduct a lab investigation and write a lab report in time for you to score it before Session 12.Session 1211Session 11: Systems, Order, and OrganizationObjectives:Analyze the unifying concept of systems, order, and organization.Build a continuum showing how the concept develops in the standards, noting where the concept is introduced, developed, and mastered.Identify common misconceptions and values about systems, order, and operations, hypothesize places within the curriculum where these misconceptions may have developed, and develop strategies for teaching content in a way that corrects misconceptions.Evaluate and select effective strategies for teaching students to gather data.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #6 - Gathering Data *Complete the planning and reflection sheets on Handouts 11.13 and 11.14.Session 12Evaluating third lab investigation and science process skillsCollect the lab reports from the investigative lab activity implemented.Score the lab reports using rubrics provided by this course, using a highlighter or other method to identify the criteria level on the rubric.Bring respond plan (Handout 9.8b), updated data tracker (printout or laptop) with third set of lab scores, and sample lab investigations and rubrics for a group of students needing intensive support in the science process skills.Select students who have unique intensive support or specific needs that are common to many students. For these students, bring samples of student work, including their lab reports, with the rubrics you marked when scoring them.Session 12Materials for Session 12If possible, bring a laptop with Excel software.12Session 12: Continued Evaluation of Instructional EffectivenessObjectives:Analyze the third set of lab report data and conduct close examination of lab reports of students severely behind using structured protocol.Maximize instruction through development of an intervention plan that addresses trends in whole-class gaps and provides intensive instruction in science process skills for identified students.Evaluate and select effective strategies for teaching students to present data.Assignment DescriptionDate DueRespond plan for students based on data from the second investigationComplete Handout 12.4 for the intervention plan.Begin implementation of science process skills intervention plan.Session 13*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #7 - Presenting Data*Come to the next session having implemented the strategy you worked on in Session 12, along with the completed planning and reflection sheets on Handouts 12.8 and 12.9 and be ready to discuss your evidence.Session 13Preview unifying conceptReview and complete Handout 13.2 for the upcoming unifying concept evidence, models, and explanation.Take notes on Handouts 13.2 and 13.5.Bring a scientific model students use in your class.Complete Handout 13.6 with standards, topics, and misconceptions related to the unifying concepts of evidence, models, and explanation.Session 1313Session 13: Evidence, Models, and ExplanationsObjectives:Analyze the unifying concept of evidence, models, and explanation.Build a continuum showing how the concept develops in the standards in each major discipline, noting where the related topics are introduced, developed, and mastered.Identify common misconceptions and values about evidence, models, and explanation, hypothesize places within the curriculum where these misconceptions may have developed, and develop strategies for teaching content in a way that corrects the misconceptions.Examine and select effective strategies for teaching students to make inferences and communicate their scientific arguments.Assignment DescriptionDate Due*Strategy Implementation and Reflection #8 - Making Inferences and Communicating Scientific Arguments*Complete the planning and reflection sheets on Handouts 13.16 and 13.17.Session 14Identifying Standards Related to Science and SocietyComplete the second and third columns on Handout 14.2.Session 14Bringing lesson plans on Science and SocietyBring in a sample lesson or unit plan that you either have taught or plan to teach that incorporates themes of science and society. Preview the sample plan on Handout 14.4 as an example of what to bring.Session 14Analyzing curriculum resourcesBring your main science curricular resource to analyze how concepts are connected.Session 14Preparing to create a year-long course outlineBring your completed Unifying Concepts Continuum charts/summaries from Sessions 8, 10, 11, and 13.Session 14Preparing for a comparison of thematic and topical instructionRead the sample unit plans on Handouts 14.5a and 14.5b.Consider similarities and differences between the units.Bring in a curricular resource for an upcoming or current unit. This might include the teacher’s guide and any supporting materials.Session 1414Session 14: Science in SocietyObjectives:Explore the role of science and society, including ethics related to science, and create a plan to make this role transparent to students.Investigate resources for science in the community.Compare thematic and topic-based approaches for a given unit for the treatment of a topic in curricular resources.Use the continuum of standards for all of the unifying concepts to create a yearlong instructional skeleton organized by unit that includes real-world applications for students.Assignment DescriptionDate DueFinish year-long course outlineComplete Handout 14.9, the yearlong course outline, and bring to Session 15 to get peer feedback.Session 15Preparing for course closure and reflectionBring to Session 15:All eight sets of the Strategy Implementation Planning and Reflection SheetsData tracker with complete science process skills dataProfessional goals for teaching science (Handout 2.2)Session 15Finish curriculum analysisComplete Handout 14.7.Session 1515Session 15: Closing SessionObjectives:Examine the yearlong instructional outline and provide feedback to colleagues for continued improvement of planning and delivery.Reflect on teacher effectiveness in instruction, assessment, content knowledge, and engagement of students to identify next steps in professional development.Analyze challenges to effectively closing the achievement gap in science and identify solutions to overcoming such challenges.Determine how management routines support student engagement in content, facilitate efficient systems of data analysis, and support instructional differentiation.Assignment DescriptionDate DueUpdated PES EntryRather than revising your entire portfolio, you will revisit Component #4 and will revise your response based on your additional year of experience.See Program Completion Requirement #2 at the end of this syllabus for more details.You will also submit PES Component #1 that you revised at the beginning of year two. Be sure to review this component to ensure that it reflects your current situation if anything has changed during the school year.10 days after Session 15Improving Practice Analysis and ReflectionFor this requirement, you will discuss the breadth of your two years of experience in working with students with disabilities and in delivering effective instructional practices in a particular content area or areas in order to bolster student achievement for students with special needs. See Program Completion Requirement #3 at the end of this syllabus for more details.10 days after Session 15</li></ul>2nd Year Program Completion Requirement #1: Assessment Project Descriptions and Grading Rubrics<br />The following assessment projects are graded using a rubric composed of a subset of the Portfolio Evaluation System (PES) Performance Descriptors. The full text of all descriptors may be found in the Appendix of the PES Guidelines. The projects below are listed in the order that you will complete them in this course. These projects are similar in structure and content to the projects that you completed in your first year of the program, but are now more focused on the content-specific knowledge and skills you are gaining in your second year. As you complete them, you will make connections between the content-specific methods you are learning and the special education pedagogy you have already been exposed to and should continue to refine in order to help your students achieve goals.<br />For each competency, you will be expected to demonstrate proficiency for all of your students, as is applicable for your instructional setting. Those teaching in Co-teaching/Inclusion settings will be expected to provide evidence of teaching practice from both general education and special education students; those in other settings will be required to provide evidence from special education students only. Below is a chart with common instructional settings to help you determine the evidence you should submit. Consult your Seminar Leader for help determining the evidence if you are not teaching in one of the instructional settings listed below.<br />Special Education Instructional SettingsSettingDescriptionCo-teaching/Inclusion Classroom includes both students with disabilities and general education peersResource Room Specialist Teacher provides individualized, usually one on-one “pull out” support to students with disabilities; content areas vary depending on student needsSpecial Day Class Self-contained classroom in which all students have identified disabilities<br /><ul><li>Analyzing Content, Standards and ResourcesSubmit the following evidence of implementation along with your response to the synthesis question(s) below:Evidence of Implementation: Course AssignmentsExamining the Content Domain (Handout 1.3)Examining Standards (Handout 1.6)How are the ELA Content Domain and Standards Addressed in Instruction? (Handout 1.7b)Your responses on the above course handouts should demonstrate that you can:Identify key concepts and explain how they meet the criteria for key concepts (e.g. multifaceted, high level of Bloom’s, anchors for units).Use the content domain to articulate the relationship between key concepts you selected, demonstrating your understanding of how topics within the content domain relate to one another.Identify gaps between key concepts and your local resources and explain how you will address those gaps.Identify any supplemental assessments you will implement in addition to those provided by the local resource.Classroom ArtifactsSelect 1-2 pieces of evidence from your classroom that support your synthesis statement about your development and performance.Synthesis statement: Review evidence from your classroom, your responses to the course assignment handouts listed above, and the descriptors related to this assessment project. Write a statement reflecting on your development and performance with regard to the content domain, content pedagogy, and your ability to communicate content knowledge to students. Consider the evidence from the course assignments as well as the following questions as you develop your statement:What are your strengths and areas of development with regard to content knowledge and content pedagogy? How are you working to capitalize on your strengths and improve your development areas?What challenges have you encountered when teaching particular strands or concepts of the content domain? To what are these challenges attributable and how have you addressed them? What future content challenges do you anticipate and how do you plan to address them?How do you set specific learning goals and milestones for content mastery?How have you used your content knowledge to make informed decisions about how to use or adapt your local resources?Your statement should illustrate your current level of performance on each of the following related descriptors and be no more than three pages in length.</li></ul>Performance Descriptors for Analyzing Content, Standards and Resources:Descriptor Reference IneffectiveDevelopingProficientSkillfulC1.1 Confident in content material C1.1a Participant is not confident in content-area material; does not identify steps to develop areas of improvement.C1.1b Participant is not confident in aspects of content-area material but outlines steps to develop areas of improvement.C1.1c Participant demonstrates continued investment in and confidence about own understanding of content-area material; may also identify areas of improvement and concrete development plans.C1.1d Participant incorporates current research into content-area teaching practice; is comfortable identifying areas of development and addresses them within a cycle of practice.C1.2 Understands structure and vocabulary of domainC1.2a Participant does not understand the unique structure and vocabulary of the content domain or their impact on instructional planning and delivery.C1.2b Participant articulates how understanding the unique structure and vocabulary of the content domain is important for their own teaching practice but does not share these concepts with their students.C1.2c Participant articulates the importance of understanding the unique structure and vocabulary of the content domain and the value of communicating these concepts to their students. Participant is able to make connections within areas of the content domain.C1.2d Participant consistently refers to the unique structure and vocabulary of the content domain, shares that structure with students, and demonstrates how to help students make connections within and among content areas.C1.3 Takes own learning and student experiences into account when planningC1.3a Participant's understanding of content-area learning and planning is not informed by their own learning experience or that of their students.C1.3b Participant does not instinctively take own learning experiences into account; however, at times the participant examines their own learning process in an attempt to inform content-area learning and planning. C1.3c Participant takes own learning experiences into account when planning instruction, but may have trouble thinking about their students' learning processes with regard to content-area instruction.C1.3d Participant consistently evaluates and takes their own and their students' experiences into account when planning instruction. Participant is able to articulate what they would do differently as a result of considering student learning processes.C1.4 Analyzes content standards and articulates value to students C1.4a Participant does not articulate value in analyzing standards to prioritize them for student mastery.C1.4b Participant analyzes content-area standards, but does not consistently articulate value in following a process to prioritize content for student mastery. Participant sometimes struggles to recognize value in evaluating standards for themselves if local curricular agencies have also done so.C1.4c Participant analyzes content-area standards and articulates value in prioritizing content for student mastery. Participant makes connections between different topics of content area, though may not consistently make connections transparent to students.C1.4d Participant analyzes content-area standards and shares with students the value in prioritizing content for student mastery. Participant demonstrates ability to cluster content within and across content areas to help students make generalizations and access other domains of knowledge.C2.1 Articulates goals aligned to standardsC2.1a Participant is unable to articulate lesson or unit goals. C2.1b Participant articulates lesson or unit goals but not in a way that makes it apparent that the goals are based on an analysis of the content domain and/or relevant content standards. Rather, the goals are focused within the context of a self-contained lesson or set of lessons.C2.1c Participant articulates lesson or unit goals that are aligned to the content domain and/or relevant content standards; however the participant is at times unable to communicate a vision of success for students beyond the immediate goals of the lesson or unit.C2.1d Participant articulates lesson and/or unit goals that are aligned to the content domain and/or relevant content standards and describes a compelling vision of what educational goals should be for their students. Participant communicates to students a model of what success looks like in the short term and the long term. C2.2 Develops goals from larger vision of student outcomesC2.2a Participant's process for setting specific learning goals is not influenced by larger content-area student outcomes; participant struggles to see beyond immediate context of setting short-term goals or mastery of a content milestone.C2.1b Participant makes an effort to develop specific learning goals that lead to larger content-area student outcomes, but instructional strategies do not consistently move students toward those goals.C2.1c Participant develops specific learning goals from a vision of larger content-area student outcomes. Participant develops instructional strategies to move students toward those larger goals, but may not always succeed in helping students progress. C2.1d Participant's process for instructional planning and setting specific learning goals is consistently informed by a vision of larger content-area student outcomes. Instructional strategies consistently and strategically move students toward content mastery milestones. C3.1 Assess potential gaps between local resources and standards to help students meet goals C3.1a Participant acknowledges teaching context but is not able to move beyond challenges that may arise and address student needs.C3.1b Participant considers local teaching context and is sometimes able to identify any alignment gaps between the local curriculum, content standards, and content knowledge. Participant may still struggle to move beyond challenges in a productive manner.C3.1c Participant considers their teaching context, assesses local curricular resources as compared to content standards and content knowledge, and provides supplemental resources to ensure students meet goals.C3.1d Participant consistently evaluates local context and assesses local curricular resources. Participant identifies curricular gaps, provides supplemental resources to ensure students meet goals, and advocates for curricular adaptations with key stakeholders.C3.2 Considers larger issues impacting student performanceC3.2a Participant does not consider the impact of larger issues and current research on their classroom, and tends to see students' abilities within the content area as more or less fixed.C3.2b Participant sometimes looks beyond the immediate and daily details of classroom events and considers larger issues that may impact students' performance in content area; however, the participant still struggles to identify those issues.C3.2c Participant frequently considers larger issues impacting student performance in the content area and begins to identify solutions to address them within practice.C3.2d Participant frequently identifies and considers research about issues impacting student performance in the content area; participant articulates and demonstrates how these issues will positively inform their practice.<br /><ul><li>Aligning Strategies to Content Requirements and Student NeedsSubmit the following evidence of implementation along with your response to the synthesis question(s) below:Evidence of Implementation: Course AssignmentsA completed Strategy Implementation Planning SheetThe corresponding Strategy Implementation Reflection Sheet and a selection of three pieces of student work that demonstrate whether students met objectives.Notes from the corresponding Strategy Implementation Group DebriefYour responses on the above course handouts should demonstrate that you can:Align content objectives and selected strategies to standards. Write content objectives that are realistic and ambitious for the target student(s), given their current skill level.Articulate how the lesson is connected to a larger unit.Select appropriate, aligned formative assessments and involve students in assessing their own progress.Provide a clear plan considering all necessary steps to implement the selected strategy.Articulate the rationale for the selected strategy.Provide sufficient evidence that indicates whether students met objectives.Articulate any trends in the objectives students met or did not meet.Articulate clear and logical next steps to ensure target students meet objectives.Classroom Artifacts(optional)Select 1-2 additional pieces of evidence from your classroom that support your statement about your development and performance.Synthesis statement: Review evidence from your classroom, your responses to the course assignment handouts listed above, and the descriptors related to this assessment project. Write a statement reflecting on your development and performance with regard to using and differentiating content-specific instructional choices; evaluating the effectiveness of those choices; and re-teaching concepts using different instructional choices. Consider the evidence from the course assignments as well as the following questions as you develop your statement:What are your strengths and areas of development with regard to designing instruction that results in student achievement? How are you working to capitalize on your strengths and improve your development areas?What role did content and assessment play in your selection of particular instructional strategies? Use specific evidence from your artifacts.Describe how you have addressed classroom management in your instructional planning and implications of classroom management on future planning.Your statement should illustrate your current level of performance on each of the following related descriptors and be no more than three pages in length.</li></ul>Performance Descriptor Rubric for Aligning Strategies to Content Requirements and Student Needs:Descriptor Reference IneffectiveDevelopingProficientSkillfulC2.2 Develops goals from larger vision of student outcomesC2.2a Participant's process for setting specific learning goals is not influenced by larger content-area student outcomes; participant struggles to see beyond immediate context of setting short-term goals or mastery of a content milestone.C2.2b Participant makes an effort to develop specific learning goals that lead to larger content-area student outcomes, but instructional strategies do not consistently move students toward those goals.C2.2c Participant develops specific learning goals from a vision of larger content-area student outcomes. Participant develops instructional strategies to move students toward those larger goals, but may not always succeed in helping students progress. C2.2d Participant's process for instructional planning and setting specific learning goals is consistently informed by a vision of larger content-area student outcomes. Instructional strategies consistently and strategically move students toward content mastery milestones. I1.1 Instructional choices are aligned to content domainI1.1a Participant does not consider content domain and standards in instructional choices; selects instructional strategies based on criteria within lesson or other criteria not aligned to larger content priorities.I1.1b Participant attempts to make instructional choices that are aligned to the content domain and prioritized content standards; however, some instructional strategies are still selected based on unaligned criteria.I1.1c Participant makes instructional choices that reflect major aspects of the content domain and standards prioritization. These choices frequently move students toward learning goals.I1.1d Participant consistently makes instructional choices that are aligned to the content domain and reflect standards prioritization and that move students toward learning goals.I1.2 Invests self and students in lesson designI1.2a Participant's lesson design and delivery does not invest students in their own learning. Students rarely move toward or meet learning goals.I1.2b Participant demonstrates an understanding of the need to make learning meaningful to students in lesson design and delivery, but is not always able to do so. Participants' choices in lesson design and delivery sometimes results in moving students toward or meeting goals.I1.2c Participant's lesson design and implementation reflects confidence with subject matter and students are invested in the content-specific instructional choices made to help them meet goals. Lesson design and delivery frequently moves students toward meeting goals.I1.2d Participant's lesson design and implementation is rooted in deep but flexible knowledge of the subject matter. It is evident that the rationale for instructional choices made has been shared with students and they understand how their instruction will help them meet goals.I2.1 Uses knowledge of student behavior and motivation to increase student performanceI2.1a Participant makes little or no effort to understand student behaviors and motivation and how they may impact content-area learning.I2.1b Participant makes an effort to understand how students' behavior and motivation impact individual student performance in the content area, but has done little research to understand the whys for certain students.I2.1c Participant investigates common student behaviors and demonstrates an understanding of how student motivation impacts content-area learning, specifically. Participant may generalize some of this understanding and engage some students in one-on-one or small-group settings to address.I2.1d Participant articulates how they have proactively gathered information on specific student behavior and involves students in conversations about their experiences with content-area learning. The participant is learning to discriminate between issues of general motivation and challenges with content-specific motivation.I2.2 Takes individual learning needs into account and makes necessary accommodationsI2.2a Participant makes little or no effort to identify individual students' needs and does not make accommodations in his or her instruction for those needs.I2.2b Participant is aware of the value of identifying individual students' needs and making accommodations for those needs; however, frequently he or she is either unsure about what accommodations to make or defaults to one strategy without considering its appropriateness. I2.2c Participant frequently takes individual students' learning needs--as identified through data and student profiles--into account in instructional planning by making appropriate accommodations. The participant may still struggle to do this for all students, but is aware that this is a goal.I2.2d Participant consistently and accurately identifies individual students' needs and addresses those needs by adapting instruction through appropriate accommodations and engaging those students in developing scaffolds.I2.3 Focuses on the needs of both individuals and the groupI2.3a Participant frames differentiation as a challenge and does not make many efforts to try different strategies to reach more students.I2.3b Participant generally focuses on the needs of large clusters of students; there are certain students outside of this cluster toward whom the participant does not demonstrate accountability.I2.3c Participant focuses on the needs of large clusters of students; however, he or she is able to describe instructional plans for students in the margins as well. I2.3d Participant has a varied system of managing for differentiation and is able to describe and demonstrate accountability measures for all students.I3.2 Uses assessment data to evaluate instructional choicesI3.2a Participant does not consider assessment results when selecting and evaluating instructional choices. I3.2b Participant considers assessment results when selecting and evaluating instructional choices, but the alignment between the assessment data and the instructional choice is flawed.I3.2c Participant uses assessment data to make and evaluate instructional choices; the instructional choices are clearly aligned to and supported by the data. I3.2d Participant integrates the use of assessment data into ongoing instructional planning and makes instructional choices that are clearly supported by the data. Participant articulates how data is used to evaluate the instructional choices as well as to inform future, related instructional planning.I3.3 Integrates classroom management considerations into instructional planningI3.3a Participant views instructional design and delivery and classroom management and culture as separate means to separate goals; may describe classroom events from an unbalanced or inaccurate perspective as a result. I3.3b Participant attempts to consider how to manage an instructional process to maximize instructional time, but only occasionally or when prompted.I3.3c Participant understands the importance of classroom management and classroom culture in instructional planning as demonstrated through purposefully using these elements to maximize instructional time. Participant describes plans to attend to both processes when planning for student success.I3.3d Participant consistently manages for success by considering classroom management and classroom culture in their instructional planning. Furthermore, the participant demonstrates this as a daily practice.I4.1 Describes the processes behind student thinkingI4.1a Participant makes little or no effort to examine and understand students' thought processes. Instead, participant responds based solely on his or her own thinking.I4.1b Participant pays some attention to the ways in which students think, but still privileges his or her own thought process and answers. The participants' response and potential reframing is somewhat influenced by student processes.I4.1c Participant describes the whys behind student thinking--the process through which students develop their understanding of content material--as well as the products and answers at which they arrive.I4.1d Participant describes the whys behind student thinking and the products at which students arrive. Participant begins teaching to students' potential--what they are capable of thinking--instead of focusing exclusively on where they currently are.I4.2 Describes teaching moments from a variety of perspectivesI4.2a Participant views teaching events from a single perspective and is unable to see beyond their immediate experience. Participant does not articulate how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.I4.2b Participant sometimes describes teaching moments from more than one perspective, though sometimes returns to the same interpretation of events. Participant sometimes describes how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.I4.2c Participant describes teaching moments from a variety of perspectives and is beginning to analyze how these individual moments impact larger student achievement goals. Participant describes how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.I4.2d Participant consistently describes teaching moments from a variety of perspectives and is able to provide multiple interpretations and describe potential outcomes for singular events as they may relate to larger student achievement goals. Rather than being overwhelmed by the big picture, the participant sees opportunity for growth in the multiple outcomes. Participant consistently articulates a detailed account of how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.<br /><ul><li>Diagnosing Student Readiness, Setting Achievement Goals, and Monitoring Progress – Part 1Submit the following evidence of implementation along with your response to the synthesis question(s) below:Evidence of Implementation: Course AssignmentsInitial diagnostic assessment results and analysis (Data Tracker)Setting student goals (Handout 5.14)Teaching plan (Handout 6.7b)Your responses on the above course handouts should demonstrate that you can:Set goals that are driven by probe data and meet the SMART criteria.Create logical small group assignments.Differentiate instructional strategies to meet the needs of each group of students and articulate a clear rationale for each strategy.Identify formative assessments to measure ongoing student progress toward goals.Articulate timing and management considerations for reaching student goals.Classroom ArtifactsSelect 1-2 pieces of evidence from your classroom that support your statement about your development and performance.Synthesis statement: Review evidence from your classroom, your responses to the course assignment handouts listed above, and the descriptors related to this assessment project. Write a statement reflecting on your development and performance with regard to data tracking and using assessment results to drive your instruction and student achievement. Consider the evidence from the course assignments as well as the following questions as you develop your statement:What are your strengths and areas of development with regard to diagnosing student readiness? How are you working to capitalize on your strengths and improve your development areas?What did your analysis of student performance on the diagnostic reveal about their potential performance in the content domain?How does other data play a role in your assessment of student performance?How do you share assessment results with students and key stakeholders to inform and celebrate progress?Your statement should illustrate your current level of performance on each of the following related descriptors and be no more than three pages in length.</li></ul>Performance Descriptor Rubric for Diagnosing Student Readiness, Part 1:Descriptor Reference IneffectiveDevelopingProficientSkillfulC2.1 Articulates goals aligned to standardsC2.1a Participant is unable to articulate lesson or unit goals. C2.1b Participant articulates lesson or unit goals but not in a way that makes it apparent that the goals are based on an analysis of the content domain and/or relevant content standards. Rather, the goals are focused within the context of a self-contained lesson or set of lessons.C2.1c Participant articulates lesson or unit goals that are aligned to the content domain and/or relevant content standards; however the participant is at times unable to communicate a vision of success for students beyond the immediate goals of the lesson or unit.C2.1d Participant articulates lesson and/or unit goals that are aligned to the content domain and/or relevant content standards and describes a compelling vision of what educational goals should be for their students. Participant communicates to students a model of what success looks like in the short term and the long term. A1.1 Uses formative assessment to track progress toward goalsA1.1a Participant does not assess and track learning throughout the instructional process.A1.1b Participant describes value of using formative assessments and may attempt to do so sporadically, but these attempts do not lead to consistent tracking of student progress.A1.1c Participant uses formative assessments to gauge student understanding and track progress toward goals. Participant articulates the value of this process.A1.1d Participant regularly uses formative assessments to check student progress toward goals. Participant also evaluates own system of data collection and tracking and seeks efficiency as well as efficacy. A1.2 Selects appropriate assessments to measure learningA1.2a Participant does not provide adequate evidence of measuring learning goals and objectives through assessment.A1.2b Participant attempts to measure through assessment whether learning goals and objectives were met, but frequently assessment selection is not appropriate or analysis is inaccurate.A1.2c Participant accurately measures learning goals and objectives through appropriate selection of assessments, though participant may still need assistance at times to do this with automaticity.A1.2d Participant regularly selects assessments that accurately measure learning goals and objectives, and participant analyzes the data accurately.A1.3 Is familiar with external exams and diagnostic assessmentsA1.3a Participant is not familiar with the knowledge and skills tested on external assessments (e.g. high-stakes standardized tests), or the gateway skills and concepts that may help students achieve proficiency in the content area.A1.3b Participant is making an effort to educate self about the knowledge and skills covered on external assessments, as well as the skills tested at a diagnostic assessment level that support overall content-area achievement.A1.3c Participant understands and is familiar with knowledge and skills addressed on external assessments as well as on diagnostic assessments that may serve as proxies for achievement within a content area. Participant frequently is able to use the knowledge of the content of these assessments to adjust instruction for groups of students to increase alignment between content goals and external requirements.A1.3d Participant consistently uses a thorough understanding of the knowledge and skills tested on external and diagnostic assessments to adjust instruction for individual students and groups of students as needed to ensure alignment of instruction to content goals and external requirements.A2.1 Uses assessment data to move students toward goalsA2.1a Participant does not use formative assessment data to make instructional decisions.A2.1b Participant uses formative assessment data to make instructional decisions, but the revisions don't always lead to students making progress toward goals. A2.1c Participant uses formative assessment data to make instructional decisions and can demonstrate how the revised instructional choices often lead to student progress toward goals. A2.1d Participant accurately analyzes formative assessment data for groups of students as well as individuals, and consistently designs instruction that leads students to meet goals.A2.2 Uses multiple assessment measures to inform instructionA2.2a Participant does not use assessment data to inform instructional practice.A2.2b Participant relies on assessment data from one source, which frequently results in inefficient instructional decisions.A2.2c Participant uses multiple assessment measures and incorporates data from different points to make instructional decisions.A2.2d Participant regularly uses multiple assessment measures and incorporates data to make appropriate instructional decisions.A2.3 Accurately analyze data and provide rationale for instructional choicesA2.3a Participant's analysis of data is flawed and does not lead to accurate findings. Participant is not able to provide a compelling rationale for the instructional choices made, regardless of whether the findings were accurate.A2.3b Participant's analysis of data is sometimes flawed, but based on findings cited, participant is able to develop a compelling instructional plan that leads students toward larger goals.A2.3c Participant can accurately analyze the data, develop a compelling instructional plan and provide rationale for the instructional choices made, whether or not students meet the goals. A2.3d Participant gathers data from multiple sources to inform analysis of student performance. Participant consistently uses data as a springboard to develop instructional plans that lead students toward goals, and provides aligned rationale for instructional choices.A3.1 Shares assessment results with students and key stakeholders to inform and celebrate progressA3.1a Participant does not articulate plans to share assessment data with students and key stakeholders.A3.1b Participant indicates interest in sharing assessment data with students and key stakeholders and may do so at times, but not consistently. Participant either describes a plan to invest key stakeholders but omits student achievement from the plan, or participant does not describe a plan to cultivate allies at all.A3.1c Participant regularly shares assessment data with students and key stakeholders. Participant articulates the importance of cultivating allies and partnerships with key stakeholders in the school community to support student achievement but is able to do so only in isolated instances.A3.1d Participant establishes a strategic plan to share assessment results with and invest students and key stakeholders in the success of his or her students. Participant consistently cultivates allies in the school community to support student achievement goals and demonstrates how these relationships impact student progress toward those goals. A3.2 Uses assessment results to keep students focused on goalsA3.2a Participant does not use assessments that provide feedback on student progress and does not articulate this as a goal. A3.2b Participant uses assessments that provide feedback on student progress, but does not articulate how they will communicate feedback to students.A3.2c Participant uses assessments that provide feedback on student progress and communicates this feedback to students in a way that keeps them focused on and headed toward instructional goals.A3.2d Participant consistently uses assessments both for instruction and evaluation, and uses assessments effectively to invest students in staying on track toward goals.I3.2 Uses assessment data to evaluate instructional choicesI3.2a Participant does not consider assessment results when selecting and evaluating instructional choices. I3.2b Participant considers assessment results when selecting and evaluating instructional choices, but the alignment between the assessment data and the instructional choice is flawed.I3.2c Participant uses assessment data to make and evaluate instructional choices; the instructional choices are clearly aligned to and supported by the data. I3.2d Participant integrates the use of assessment data into ongoing instructional planning and makes instructional choices that are clearly supported by the data. Participant articulates how data is used to evaluate the instructional choices as well as to inform future, related instructional planning.<br /><ul><li>Creating a Professional Development PlanSubmit the following evidence of implementation along with your response to the synthesis question(s) below:Evidence of Implementation: Course AssignmentsProfessional Goals and Action Steps (Handout 2.2)Your responses on the above course handouts should demonstrate that you can:Design goals that are SMART and driven by self-assessment data.Connect goals to course competencies.Define clear, logical action steps that are aligned to the goals and include a time frame for reaching the goals.Classroom ArtifactsSelect 1-2 pieces of evidence from your classroom that support your statement about your development and performance.Synthesis statement: Review evidence from your classroom, your responses to the course assignment handouts listed above, and the descriptors related to this assessment project. Write a statement reflecting on your development and performance with regard to setting and meeting professional goals. Consider the evidence from the course assignment as well as the following questions as you develop your statement:Reflect on your current professional goals. What was your process in selecting professional goals? What has been your progress to date? In what ways are you holding yourself accountable to achieving these goals? Discuss specific action steps taken and resulting outcomes.What effects have your professional goals had on the achievement of your students? Were the effects intended?Your statement should illustrate your current level of performance on each of the following related descriptors and be no more than three pages in length.</li></ul>Performance Descriptor Rubric for Creating a Professional Development Plan:Descriptor Reference IneffectiveDevelopingProficientSkillfulC1.1 Confident in content material C1.1a Participant is not confident in content-area material; does not identify steps to develop areas of improvement.C1.1b Participant is not confident in aspects of content-area material but outlines steps to develop areas of improvement.C1.1c Participant demonstrates continued investment in and confidence about own understanding of content-area material; may also identify areas of improvement and concrete development plans.C1.1d Participant incorporates current research into content-area teaching practice; is comfortable identifying areas of development and addresses them within a cycle of practice.C1.3 Takes own learning and student experiences into account when planningC1.3a Participant's understanding of content-area learning and planning is not informed by their own learning experience or that of their students.C1.3b Participant does not instinctively take own learning experiences into account; however, at times the participant examines their own learning process in an attempt to inform content-area learning and planning. C1.3c Participant takes own learning experiences into account when planning instruction, but may have trouble thinking about their students' learning processes with regard to content-area instruction.C1.3d Participant consistently evaluates and takes their own and their students' experiences into account when planning instruction. Participant is able to articulate what they would do differently as a result of considering student learning processes.C3.2 Considers larger issues impacting student performanceC3.2a Participant does not consider the impact of larger issues and current research on their classroom, and tends to see students' abilities within the content area as more or less fixed.C3.2b Participant sometimes looks beyond the immediate and daily details of classroom events and considers larger issues that may impact students' performance in content area; however, the participant still struggles to identify those issues.C3.2c Participant frequently considers larger issues impacting student performance in the content area and begins to identify solutions to address them within practice.C3.2d Participant frequently identifies and considers research about issues impacting student performance in the content area; participant articulates and demonstrates how these issues will positively inform their practice.A2.3 Accurately analyze data and provide rationale for instructional choicesA2.3a Participant's analysis of data is flawed and does not lead to accurate findings. Participant is not able to provide a compelling rationale for the instructional choices made, regardless of whether the findings were accurate.A2.3b Participant's analysis of data is sometimes flawed, but based on findings cited, participant is able to develop a compelling instructional plan that leads students toward larger goals.A2.3c Participant can accurately analyze the data, develop a compelling instructional plan and provide rationale for the instructional choices made, whether or not students meet the goals. A2.3d Participant gathers data from multiple sources to inform analysis of student performance. Participant consistently uses data as a springboard to develop instructional plans that lead students toward goals, and provides aligned rationale for instructional choices.A3.1 Shares assessment results with students and key stakeholders to inform and celebrate progressA3.1a Participant does not articulate plans to share assessment data with students and key stakeholders.A3.1b Participant indicates interest in sharing assessment data with students and key stakeholders and may do so at times, but not consistently. Participant either describes a plan to invest key stakeholders but omits student achievement from the plan, or participant does not describe a plan to cultivate allies at all.A3.1c Participant regularly shares assessment data with students and key stakeholders. Participant articulates the importance of cultivating allies and partnerships with key stakeholders in the school community to support student achievement but is able to do so only in isolated instances.A3.1d Participant establishes a strategic plan to share assessment results with and invest students and key stakeholders in the success of his or her students. Participant consistently cultivates allies in the school community to support student achievement goals and demonstrates how these relationships impact student progress toward those goals. A3.2 Uses assessment results to keep students focused on goalsA3.2a Participant does not use assessments that provide feedback on student progress and does not articulate this as a goal. A3.2b Participant uses assessments that provide feedback on student progress, but does not articulate how they will communicate feedback to students.A3.2c Participant uses assessments that provide feedback on student progress and communicates this feedback to students in a way that keeps them focused on and headed toward instructional goals.A3.2d Participant consistently uses assessments both for instruction and evaluation, and uses assessments effectively to invest students in staying on track toward goals.I2.1 Uses knowledge of student behavior and motivation to increase student performanceI2.1a Participant makes little or no effort to understand student behaviors and motivation and how they may impact content-area learning.I2.1b Participant makes an effort to understand how students' behavior and motivation impact individual student performance in the content area, but has done little research to understand the whys for certain students.I2.1c Participant investigates common student behaviors and demonstrates an understanding of how student motivation impacts content-area learning, specifically. Participant may generalize some of this understanding and engage some students in one-on-one or small-group settings to address.I2.1d Participant articulates how they have proactively gathered information on specific student behavior and involves students in conversations about their experiences with content-area learning. The participant is learning to discriminate between issues of general motivation and challenges with content-specific motivation.I3.3 Integrates classroom management considerations into instructional planningI3.3a Participant views instructional design and delivery and classroom management and culture as separate means to separate goals; may describe classroom events from an unbalanced or inaccurate perspective as a result. I3.3b Participant attempts to consider how to manage an instructional process to maximize instructional time, but only occasionally or when prompted.I3.3c Participant understands the importance of classroom management and classroom culture in instructional planning as demonstrated through purposefully using these elements to maximize instructional time. Participant describes plans to attend to both processes when planning for student success.I3.3d Participant consistently manages for success by considering classroom management and classroom culture in their instructional planning. Furthermore, the participant demonstrates this as a daily practice.I4.1 Describes the processes behind student thinkingI4.1a Participant makes little or no effort to examine and understand students' thought processes. Instead, participant responds based solely on his or her own thinking.I4.1b Participant pays some attention to the ways in which students think, but still privileges his or her own thought process and answers. The participants' response and potential reframing is somewhat influenced by student processes.I4.1c Participant describes the whys behind student thinking--the process through which students develop their understanding of content material--as well as the products and answers at which they arrive.I4.1d Participant describes the whys behind student thinking and the products at which students arrive. Participant begins teaching to students' potential--what they are capable of thinking--instead of focusing exclusively on where they currently are.I4.2 Describes teaching moments from a variety of perspectivesI4.2a Participant views teaching events from a single perspective and is unable to see beyond their immediate experience. Participant does not articulate how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.I4.2b Participant sometimes describes teaching moments from more than one perspective, though sometimes returns to the same interpretation of events. Participant sometimes describes how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.I4.2c Participant describes teaching moments from a variety of perspectives and is beginning to analyze how these individual moments impact larger student achievement goals. Participant describes how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.I4.2d Participant consistently describes teaching moments from a variety of perspectives and is able to provide multiple interpretations and describe potential outcomes for singular events as they may relate to larger student achievement goals. Rather than being overwhelmed by the big picture, the participant sees opportunity for growth in the multiple outcomes. Participant consistently articulates a detailed account of how they would modify their teaching practice to help students meet goals.<br /><ul><li>Diagnosing Student Readiness, Setting Achievement Goals, and Monitoring Progress – Part 2Submit the following evidence of implementation along with your response to the synthesis question(s) below:Evidence of Implementation: Course AssignmentsSecond assessment administration results and analysis (Data Tracker)Respond plan (Handout 9.8b)Your responses on the above course handouts should demonstrate that you can:Create logical small group assignments.Differentiate instructional strategies to meet the needs of each group of students based on the re-evaluation data and articulate a clear rationale for each strategy.Identify formative assessments to measure ongoing student progress toward goals.Articulate timing and management considerations for reaching student goals.Classroom ArtifactsSelect 1-2 pieces of evidence from your classroom that support your statement about your development and performance.Synthesis statement: Review evidence from your classroom, your responses to the course assignment handouts listed above, and the descriptors related to this assessment project. Write a statement reflecting on your development and performance with regard to data tracking and using assessment results to drive your instruction and student achievement. Consider the evidence from the course assignments as well as the following questions as you develop your statement:Discuss the strengths and areas of development you listed in Part 1 of the Diagnosing Student Readiness assessment project—how have you progressed? Cite evidence from student work and course assignments.How have you communicated student progress to students and stakeholders?How have you changed your instructional plans to respond to the assessment data you have collected? What was your rationale for doing so?Your statement should illustrate your current level of performance on each of the following related descriptors and be no more than three pages in length.</li></ul>Performance Descriptor Rubric for Diagnosing Student Readiness, Part 2:Descriptor Reference IneffectiveDevelopingProficientSkillfulC2.1 Articulates goals aligned to standardsC2.1a Participant is unable to articulate lesson or unit goals. C2.1b Participant articulates lesson or unit goals but not in a way that makes it apparent that the goals are based on an analysis of the content domain and/or relevant content standards. Rather, the goals are focused within the context of a self-contained lesson or set of lessons.C2.1c Participant articulates lesson or unit goals that are aligned to the content domain and/or relevant content standards; however the participant is at times unable to communicate a vision of success for students beyond the immediate goals of the lesson or unit.C2.1d Participant articulates lesson and/or unit goals that are aligned to the content domain and/or relevant content standards and describes a compelling vision of what educational goals should be for their students. Participant communicates to students a model of what success looks like in the short term and the long term. A1.1 Uses formative assessment to track progress toward goalsA1.1a Participant does not assess and track learning throughout the instructional process.A1.1b Participant describes value of using formative assessments and may attempt to do so sporadically, but these attempts do not lead to consistent tracking of student progress.A1.1c Participant uses formative assessments to gauge student understanding and track progress toward goals. Participant articulates the value of this process.A1.1d Participant regularly uses formative assessments to check student progress toward goals. Participant also evaluates own system of data collection and tracking and seeks efficiency as well as efficacy. A1.2 Selects appropriate assessments to measure learningA1.2a Participant does not provide adequate evidence of measuring learning goals and objectives through assessment.A1.2b Participant attempts to measure through assessment whether learning goals and objectives were met, but frequently assessment selection is not appropriate or analysis is inaccurate.A1.2c Participant accurately measures learning goals and objectives through appropriate selection of assessments, though participant may still need assistance at times to do this with automaticity.A1.2d Participant regularly selects assessments that accurately measure learning goals and objectives, and participant analyzes the data accurately.A1.3 Is familiar with external exams and diagnostic assessmentsA1.3a Participant is not familiar with the knowledge and skills tested on external assessments (e.g. high-stakes standardized tests), or the gateway skills and concepts that may help students achieve proficiency in the content area.A1.3b Participant is making an effort to educate self about the knowledge and skills covered on external assessments, as well as the skills tested at a diagnostic assessment level that support overall content-area achievement.A1.3c Participant understands and is familiar with knowledge and skills addressed on external assessments as well as on diagnostic assessments that may serve as proxies for achievement within a content area. Participant frequently is able to use the knowledge of the content of these assessments to adjust instruction for groups of students to increase alignment between content goals and external requirements.A1.3d Participant consistently uses a thorough understanding of the knowledge and skills tested on external and diagnostic assessments to adjust instruction for individual students and groups of students as needed to ensure alignment of instruction to content goals and external requirements.A2.1 Uses assessment data to move students toward goalsA2.1a Participant does not use formative assessment data to make instructional decisions.A2.1b Participant uses formative assessment data to make instructional decisions, but the revisions don't always lead to students making progress toward goals. A2.1c Participant uses formative assessment data to make instructional decisions and can demonstrate how the revised instructional choices often lead to student progress toward goals. A2.1d Participant accurately analyzes formative assessment data for groups of students as well as individuals, and consistently designs instruction that leads students to meet goals.A2.2 Uses multiple assessment measures to inform instructionA2.2a Participant does not use assessment data to inform instructional practice.A2.2b Participant relies on assessment data from one source, which frequently results in inefficient instructional decisions.A2.2c Participant uses multiple assessment measures and incorporates data from different points to make instructional decisions.A2.2d Participant regularly uses multiple assessment measures and incorporates data to make appropriate instructional decisions.A2.3 Accurately analyze data and provide rationale for instructional choicesA2.3a Participant's analysis of data is flawed and does not lead to accurate findings. Participant is not able to provide a compelling rationale for the instructional choices made, regardless of whether the findings were accurate.A2.3b Participant's analysis of data is sometimes flawed, but based on findings cited, participant is able to develop a compelling instructional plan that leads students toward larger goals.A2.3c Participant can accurately analyze the data, develop a compelling instructional plan and provide rationale for the instructional choices made, whether or not students meet the goals. A2.3d Participant gathers data from multiple sources to inform analysis of student performance. Participant consistently uses data as a springboard to develop instructional plans that lead students toward goals, and provides aligned rationale for instructional choices.A3.1 Shares assessment results with students and key stakeholders to inform and celebrate progressA3.1a Participant does not articulate plans to share assessment data with students and key stakeholders.A3.1b Participant indicates interest in sharing assessment data with students and key stakeholders and may do so at times, but not consistently. Participant either describes a plan to invest key stakeholders but omits student achievement from the plan, or participant does not describe a plan to cultivate allies at all.A3.1c Participant regularly shares assessment data with students and key stakeholders. Participant articulates the importance of cultivating allies and partnerships with key stakeholders in the school community to support student achievement but is able to do so only in isolated instances.A3.1d Participant establishes a strategic plan to share assessment results with and invest students and key stakeholders in the success of his or her students. Participant consistently cultivates allies in the school community to support student achievement goals and demonstrates how these relationships impact student progress toward those goals. A3.2 Uses assessment results to keep students focused on goalsA3.2a Participant does not use assessments that provide feedback on student progress and does not articulate this as a goal. A3.2b Participant uses assessments that provide feedback on student progress, but does not articulate how they will communicate feedback to students.A3.2c Participant uses assessments that provide feedback on student progress and communicates this feedback to students in a way that keeps them focused on and headed toward instructional goals.A3.2d Participant consistently uses assessments both for instruction and evaluation, and uses assessments effectively to invest students in staying on track toward goals.I3.2 Uses assessment data to evaluate instructional choicesI3.2a Participant does not consider assessment results when selecting and evaluating instructional choices. I3.2b Participant considers assessment results when selecting and evaluating instructional choices, but the alignment between the assessment data and the instructional choice is flawed.I3.2c Participant uses assessment data to make and evaluate instructional choices; the instructional choices are clearly aligned to and supported by the data. I3.2d Participant integrates the use of assessment data into ongoing instructional planning and makes instructional choices that are clearly supported by the data. Participant articulates how data is used to evaluate the instructional choices as well as to inform future, related instructional planning.<br />2nd Year Program Completion Requirement #2: Updated PES Component #4 – Setting Goals for Student Achievement and Professional Development<br />As part of your Portfolio submission last year, you developed professional development goals for yourself based on an analysis of your students’ growth areas. Linking your own development with your students’ achievement helped to cement the idea that the teacher’s responsibility is to close the achievement gap, and that you should take specific and actionable measures to determine how to do so, perhaps outside of the classroom. For this Requirement, you are asked to review your submission from last year and document the following, thinking about this year’s teaching practice: <br />What were your goals for your students? Did your students meet those goals? Why or why not? <br />How did your experiences last year influence your goal setting process this year? What modifications will you make or have you made? Why? <br />What were your professional goals? What progress did you make toward achieving those goals? What impact, if any, did those goals have on your students’ achievement? <br />What professional goals have you set for this year? Based on what data sources? <br />In what ways will content intersect with special education pedagogy in your students’ goals and your goals this year? <br />You should submit artifacts to support statements made, such as documentation of student goal-setting processes, professional goal setting plans and documentation of attendance at workshops or conferences, student achievement data, IEP meeting summaries and student work showing progress toward goals, etc. <br />2nd Year Program Completion Requirement #3: Improving Practice Analysis and Reflection<br />Over the course of two years, you should have developed an articulate sense of what effective teaching looks like, and also what habits of mind and practices are necessary to help ensure student mastery of desired outcomes in order to close the achievement gap. For this Requirement, you will discuss the breadth of your two years of experience in working with students with disabilities and in delivering effective instructional practices in a particular content area or areas in order to bolster student achievement for students with special needs. Demonstrating this intersection between special education pedagogy and content-specific domain and standards knowledge, along with assessment methods and instructional strategies, represents the culmination of the knowledge and skills necessary to teach special education at the secondary level. It is critical that you can explain their choices and methods for doing so. <br />In 5-7 pages, you will: <br />Discuss modifications to your introduction of content and standards, use of diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment data to set goals for students and improve instructions, and the specific instructional strategies used to promote mastery of content to meet or exceed academic goals <br />These modifications should be grounded in your experiences with the special education and content-specific coursework and classroom-based experiences. <br />Provide student work samples and artifacts to support improvements made in teaching practice that reflects growth in content, assessment, instruction, use of resources and community-based support <br />

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