SI.Part3of3.PayneStudy

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This slide show summarizes a few key conclusions of the Payne Fund Study, headed by Herbert Blumer. It used symbolic interactionism to analysis media effects of children through college-age young adults.

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SI.Part3of3.PayneStudy

  1. 1. SYMBOLIC INTERACTION An Introduction Part 3 of 3 2007 Enid Sefcovic, Ph.D. [email_address]
  2. 2. <ul><li>Areas of Influence: </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s play –50% higher rate of character impersonation among movie goers. Might act out an adventure story together. </li></ul>MOVIES AND CONDUCT PAYNE FUND STUDY
  3. 3. <ul><li>Areas of Influence: </li></ul><ul><li>Romance and dating </li></ul><ul><li>Personal beautification </li></ul>MOVIES AND CONDUCT PAYNE FUND STUDY EXCERPT 62% report imitating movies for how to dress and social adjustment
  4. 4. <ul><li>Daydreaming </li></ul><ul><li>Adventure </li></ul><ul><li>Romance (females) </li></ul>MOVIES AND CONDUCT PAYNE FUND STUDY EXCERPT Google images from films Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and Zorro
  5. 5. <ul><li>Areas of Influence: </li></ul><ul><li>Emotions: Experiences of fear, sorrow, and pathos reported by 64% of students </li></ul><ul><li>Females cry more often than males </li></ul>MOVIES AND CONDUCT PAYNE FUND STUDY
  6. 6. <ul><li>The entire study is available as part of the Mead Project, Department of Sociology, Brock University, St. Catherines, Canada. </li></ul><ul><li>Blumer, H. (1933). Movies and conduct . NY: Macmillan & Company. http://www.brocku.ca/MeadProject/Blumer/1933/Blumer_1933_toc.html </li></ul>MOVIES AND CONDUCT The Complete Study
  7. 7. <ul><li>Illustrate the three premises of symbolic interactionism using a political or personal example. </li></ul><ul><li>500 to 750 words, APA style. </li></ul><ul><li>Details in Assignments area of Blackboard. </li></ul>WEEK 1 ASSIGNMENT
  8. 8. <ul><li>Response to behaviorism </li></ul><ul><li>Approach or theory? </li></ul><ul><li>Three premises </li></ul><ul><li>Links for exploration and two required readings; reference list follows </li></ul>SUMMARY
  9. 9. <ul><li>Littlejohn, S. W. (1989). Theories of human communication . Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. </li></ul><ul><li>McQuail, D. (1991). Reflections on uses and gratifications research. (In R. K. Avery and D. Eason, Critical perspectives on media and society , pp. 9-27). New York: Guilford. </li></ul><ul><li>Meltzer, B. N., Petras, J. W., and Reynolds, L.T. (1975). Symbolic interactionism: Genesis, varieties and criticism . Monographs in Social Theory (A. Brittain, ed.). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. </li></ul>REFERENCES
  10. 10. <ul><li>Chandler, D. (2000). The transmission model of communication. Aberystwyth, UK: Aberystwyth University. Retrieved October 20, 2007 at http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/short/trans.html#F </li></ul><ul><li>Kaminski, S. (2002). Communication models. Accessed October 21, 2007 at http://www.shkaminski.com/Classes/Handouts/Communication%20Models.htm </li></ul><ul><li>There are some intriguing sophisticated communication models here. I cannot determine Kaminski’s qualifications from his website. </li></ul><ul><li>McClelland, K. (2000). Symbolic interactionism. Grinnell, IA: Grinnell College. Accessed Sept. 18, 2007 at http://web.grinnell.edu/courses/soc/s00/soc111-01/IntroTheories/Symbolic.html </li></ul>OPTIONAL EXPLORATION FOR YOU

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