Integrating Social Media intoOnline Educational Spaces:Modeling Professional Practice inInstructional Interactions        ...
Social media in instruction: Outline      Audiences for social media      Social media history      Opportunities and c...
Audiences for social media      Interviews with 1,753 (12+) people in 2010 indicate that 48%       have profile pages on ...
Social media history    Hundreds, perhaps     thousands, of social     networking applications     created since 1997    ...
Opportunitiesand challengesof social media                               Adopted from: Arola, K. L. (2010). The design of ...
Emergingsocial medialiteracies   Current strategies for    integrating social media    into educational spaces   Social ...
Contested writing spaces         “What unites and distinguishes these digital writing          environments from those in...
Struggles in contested spaces     Struggles over     Equal access     Intellectual property and sharing     Privacy and...
Instruction and professional writing ashumanistic         Tacit positivist assumptions of both science and technical     ...
Rhetorical professional writinginstruction       A rhetorical professional writing        classroom             Focuses ...
Challenges to humanistic orientation         What we do now (skills-based training) is a reaction to the          anti-in...
Thank you. Questions?     Mehlenbacher, B. (2010). Instruction and      Technology: Designs for Everyday Learning.      C...
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Integrating social media into online educational spaces: Modeling professional practice in instructional interactions

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New Media, and social media in particular, offer new sites for learning, literacy sponsorship, and writing. The panelists in this session explore how these outlets are being used both within the classroom and by outside organizations, to support and invigorate learning and literacy practices.

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Integrating social media into online educational spaces: Modeling professional practice in instructional interactions

  1. 1. Integrating Social Media intoOnline Educational Spaces:Modeling Professional Practice inInstructional Interactions Dr. Brad Mehlenbacher Leadership, Policy & Adult & Higher Education brad_m@ncsu.edu Ashley R. Kelly Communication, Rhetoric, & Digital Media arkelly2@ncsu.edu NC State University Raleigh, North Carolina Computers & Writing 2012
  2. 2. Social media in instruction: Outline  Audiences for social media  Social media history  Opportunities and challenges of social media  Emerging social media literacies  Contested writing spaces  Struggles in contested spaces  Instruction and professional writing as humanistic  Rhetorical professional writing instruction  Challenges to a humanities orientation.* Downloaded from:Sirona Says Blog (2008). Available online: http://blog.sironaconsulting.com/sironasays/2008/06/social-media-ro.html*To download this presentation, see http://www.slideshare.net/bradmehlenbacher/
  3. 3. Audiences for social media Interviews with 1,753 (12+) people in 2010 indicate that 48% have profile pages on Facebook, LinkedIn (75% = 18-24). 30% use social networking sites several times/day By 2008, 48% of 3054 Internet adults have visited video- sharing applications (double last year) 400 million active Facebook users; 106 million Twitter users Frequent social networkers are active and group-oriented learners and watch less TV Social media are difficult to categorize, to compare, and to describe in terms of their functional goals Adopted from: Cheung, C. M. K., Chiu, P-Y., & Lee, M. K. O. (2011). Online social networks: Why do students use facebook. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1337-1343. Miller, C. C. (2010). Twitter loses its scrappy start-up status. The New York Times, April 15. Available online: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/16/technology/16twitter.html Rainie, L. (2008). Video sharing websites. Project Data Memo of the PEW Internet and American Life Project. Available online: http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2008/Pew_Videosharing_memo_Jan08.pdf.pdf Stross, R. (2010). Getting older without getting old. The New York Times, March 6. Available online: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/07/business/07digi.html?_r=1 Webster, T. (2010). The social habit—Frequent social networkers. The Edison/Arbitron Internet and Multimedia Study 2010. Somerville, NJ: Edison Research.
  4. 4. Social media history Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of social networking applications created since 1997 Adopted from:Boyd, D. M., & Ellison, N. B. (2008). Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship. Journal of Computer-MediatedCommunication, 13 (1), 210-230. Available online: http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.htmlethority’s comprehensive social media graphic at http://www.ethority.de/weblog/social-media-prisma/(see also http://www.go2web20.net)
  5. 5. Opportunitiesand challengesof social media Adopted from: Arola, K. L. (2010). The design of Web 2.0: The rise of the template, the fall of design. Computers and Composition, 27 (1), 4-14. Boston, I. (2009). Racing towards academic social networks. On the Horizon, 17 (3), 218-225. Bilton, N. (2010). Price of Facebook privacy? Start clicking. New York Times, May 12. Available online: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/13/technology/personaltech/13basics.html?pagewa Griffiths, M., & Light, B. (2008). Social networking and digital gaming media convergence: Classification and its consequences for appropriation. Information Systems Frontier, 10 (4), 447-459. Lange, P. G. (2008). Publicly private and privately public: Social networking on YouTube. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13 (1), 351-380. Lundin, R. W. (2008). Teaching with wikis: Toward a networked pedagogy. Computers and Composition, 25 (4), 432-448. Maranto, G., & Barton, M. (2010). Paradox and promise: MySpace, Facebook, and the sociopolitics of social networking in the writing classroom. Computers and Composition, 27 (1), 36-47. Young, K. S. (2004). Internet addiction: A new clinical phenomenon and its consequences. American Behavioral Scientist, 48 (4), 402-415. Zimmer, M. (2008). Preface: Critical perspectives on Web 2.0. First Monday, 13 (3). Available online: http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2445/2213
  6. 6. Emergingsocial medialiteracies Current strategies for integrating social media into educational spaces Social media use is always changing (non- stable), instructionally and professionally. Adopted from:Coppola, N. W., Hiltz, S. R., & Rotter, N. G. (2002) Becoming a virtual professor: Pedagogical roles and asynchronouslearning networks, Journal of Management Information Systems, 18 (4) 169–189.Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Clinton, K., Weigel, M., & Robinson, A. J. (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatoryculture: Media education for the 21st century. An Occasional paper for digital media and learning. MacArthur Foundation.Available online:http://digitallearning.macfound.org/atf/cf/{7E45C7E0-A3E0-4B89-AC9C-E807E1B0AE4E}/JENKINS_WHITE_PAPER.PDF
  7. 7. Contested writing spaces  “What unites and distinguishes these digital writing environments from those in print is their materiality–their existence through the hardware and software that shape their design or what Lessig (2006) calls ‘architecture’” (p. 508)  “While digital writing spaces are coded in diverse ways, they all exist in and through digital technologies, and as such they enable, constrain, challenge, reproduce, or question established practices, social orders, and hierarchies rooted in print materialities while also offering alternative practices and social orders to those established around print” (p. 508)  “Each new discursive space … is a unique constellation of participants and digital software codes” (p. 403). Adopted from:Starke-Meyerring, D. (2008). Genre, knowledge and digital code in web-based communities: An integrated theoreticalframework for shaping digital discursive spaces. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 4 (4), 398-417.Starke-Meyerring, D. (2009). The contested materialities of writing in digital environments: Implications for writingdevelopment. In R. Beard, M. Myhill, J. Riley, & M. Nystrand (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of writing development (pp.506-526). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  8. 8. Struggles in contested spaces Struggles over Equal access Intellectual property and sharing Privacy and surveillance Implications Policy engagement and research attention: “what student writers, citizens, and others will be able to access, build on, what kind of knowledge they will be able to make (p. 520) Reconsidering writing pedagogies, policies, and infrastructures: “that allow students to critically analyze and engage in the design, use, and regulation of the … spaces they inhabit” (p. 522). Adopted from:Starke-Meyerring, D. (2008). Genre, knowledge and digital code in web-based communities: An integrated theoreticalframework for shaping digital discursive spaces. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 4 (4), 398-417.Starke-Meyerring, D. (2009). The contested materialities of writing in digital environments: Implications for writingdevelopment. In R. Beard, M. Myhill, J. Riley, & M. Nystrand (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of writing development (pp.506-526). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  9. 9. Instruction and professional writing ashumanistic  Tacit positivist assumptions of both science and technical writing pedagogy leads to view of writing as superfluous —“technical and scientific writing become just a series of maneuvers for staying out of the way” (p. 613)  However, “Facts do not exist independently, waiting to be found and collected and systematized; facts are human constructions which presuppose theories” (p. 615)  This view of writing as epistemic and transformational highlights invention, agency, genre, and community  Instruction too becomes argument, construction, critique  A non-rhetorical professional writing classroom emphasizes (rules, procedures, methods, technical “accuracy” and “completeness” and single authorship of uncontested scientific and technical “facts”). Adopted from:Miller, C. R. (1979). A humanistic rationale for technical writing. College English, 40 (6), 610-617.
  10. 10. Rhetorical professional writinginstruction  A rhetorical professional writing classroom  Focuses on critical role of rhetorical invention, investigative and symbolic technologies and processes of emergent knowledge (writing as epistemic)  Critiques scientific and technical objectivity as driving principles in the construction of arguments/texts  Examines various materialities and spaces, contested and established  Highlights audience, community, and participation (“concepts, values, traditions, and style”)  Assesses and critiques reductivism and determinism in scientific and technological contexts and cultures. Adopted from:Miller, C. R. (1979). A humanistic rationale for technical writing. College English, 40 (6), 610-617.
  11. 11. Challenges to humanistic orientation  What we do now (skills-based training) is a reaction to the anti-intellectual privileging of STEM disciplines inside and outside the academy and driven by funding and budget cuts (and threats of further cuts)  Adjuncts, instructors and other non-tenure track faculty hoping to re-conceptualize as humanistic their professional writing classes may face bureaucratic and negative feedback (or worst individual reprimand)  We are inadvertently colluding to render our discipline irrelevant by ignoring the principles, theory, history, and convictions of humanistic disciplines. Adopted from:Bousquet, M. (2008). How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation. NY, NY: NYU Press.Brown, M. (2011). The Sciences vs. the Humanities: A Power Struggle. The Chronicle of Higher Education, April 11.Available online: http://chronicle.com/blogs/old-new/the-sciences-vs-humanities-a-power-struggle/336Wright, J. (2012). Debating higher ed: STEMs, skills, humanities, and hiring. Newgeography.com, February 9. Availableonline: http://www.newgeography.com/content/002661-debating-higher-ed-stems-skills-humanities-and-hiring
  12. 12. Thank you. Questions?  Mehlenbacher, B. (2010). Instruction and Technology: Designs for Everyday Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.  Mehlenbacher, B., McKone, S., Grant, C., Bowles, T., Peretti, S., & Martin, P. (2010). Social media for sustainable engineering communication. SIGDOC’10: The 28th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication. São Carlos-São- Paulo, Brazil: ACM Press.

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