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Power And Architecture
 

Power And Architecture

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    Power And Architecture Power And Architecture Presentation Transcript

    • PALACES OF POWER IN ROME
    • PALACES OF POWER THROUGH THE CENTURIES MIDDLE AGES: MODERN AGE: ROMAN EMPIRE: TEMPORAL POLITICAL FORUM POWER POWER
    • IL FORO ROMANO
    • The Forum Romanum (although the Romans often referred to it as the Forum Magnum or just the Forum) was located in the valley between the Palatine and the Capitoline Hill and was the commercial, religious and political center of the city.
    • FORUM COMIZIO: -Comizi Curiati CURIA HOSTILIA ROSTRA -Comizi Centuriati -Comizi Tributi
    • COMIZIO
    • COMIZIO The Comizio (Latin Comitium) was the political center of Rome, located in the Roman Forum. There were held the oldest citizens' assemblies. There are few visible remains after the Caesarian and Augustan transformations that almost destroyed it. In the past it occupied the northeastern corner of the Forum, between the Basilica Emilia, the Arch of Septimius Severus, and the Forum of Caesar. Caesar used most of it to build the new Curia.
    • CURIA COMIZIO
    • CURIA
    • CURIA The term curia at the beginning of the monarchy indicated a division of Roman population (that is the tribes that made up society). It was later used to signify the place where the tribes gathered to discuss state affairs. The word comes from the Latin "co-viria", that literally means "together or assembly of men. "
    • ROSTRA
    • ROSTRA The Rostra (rostrum in Latin) were a platforma in the Roman Forum from which judges held their orations. The name derived from the prows of enemy ships (rostrum note) torn off by the Romans during the victorious battle of Anzio and placed there in 338 BC. Speakers would stand on the rostra and face the north side of the comitium towards the senate house. The Republicans Rostra remained in use until they were demolished to make way for Caesar’s Forum .
    • MIDDLE AGES: TEMPORAL POWER LATERAN QUIRINAL APOSTOLIC Palace PALACE PALACE
    • LATERAN PALACE The Lateran Palace, built by Patriarch Constantine, is an ancient building whose history dates back to Imperial Rome. It was the official residence of the Roman pontiff for more than a thousand years. It is next to the Basilica of ST John of Lateran, the cathedral of Rome, and it contains the Holy See or Cathedra Romana. Sixtus V ordered to destroy the remains of the ancient palace and built a much smaller palace than the present building, designed by Domenico Fontana, who was inspired by Palazzo Farnese.
    • The rebuilt Lateran Palace was used as the papal summer residence since 1586 . Until the 19th century popes were crowned in the Basilica of St John of Lateran. The Lateran Palace now houses the Historical Museum of the Papal States, the offices of Rome Vicariate and the apartments of Rome Cardinal Vicar.
    • PALACE OF QUIRINALE
    • In 1583 Pope Gregory XIII began to build a summer residence in an area considered healthier than the Vatican Hill. It was entrusted to architect Ottaviano Mascarino. Works were completed in 1585. The Pope’s death prevented Mascarino to start a second project involving the expansion of the building.
    • The house built by Mascarino is still recognizable in the north courtyard, featuring a front double loggia, surmounted by the tower now known as the Tower of the Winds, erected after the construction of the bell tower on drafts by Carlo Maderno and Francesco Borromini. Ottaviano Mascarino's building was built on land still belonging to the family Carafa d'Este, which thought the Pope would leave the palace. Thus Pope Sixtus V, in 1587, purchased the land from the Apostolic Chamber and only then started to expand the building hiring Domenico Fontana, who totally remodeled the area with the construction of the Street Pia and Street Felice and the crossing of the Quattro Fontane. Quirinale thus became the "private" residence of the Pontiff.
    • The Palazzo of Quirinale was the Pope's residence until 1870, when Rome was conquered by the Kingdom of Italy, then it became the residence of Italian kings until 1946. The last pope to inhabit the Quirinale was Pius IX.
    • VATICAN HILL APOSTOLIC SANT’ANGELO SAINT PETER’S PALACE CASTLE BASILICA
    • VATICAN HILL
    • CASTEL SANT’ANGELO Castel Sant'Angelo (or Mausoleum of Hadrian) is a Roman monument on the right bank of the Tiber, opposite the pons Aelius (Sant'Angelo bridge) which radically changed in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Started in 125 by Emperor Hadrian as his mausoleum and inspired by the mausoleum of Augustus, it was completed by Antoninus Pius in 139.
    • The castle took its present name in 590 when Rome was afflicted by a terrible plague. Nicholas III, given the reputation of impregnability of the castle and its proximity to the Basilica of St. Peter‘s and the Vatican Palace, decided to move there part of the Apostolic See from the Lateran Palace, which he considered unsafe. To provide greater security to the Vatican Palace the famous “passetto“, a protected passage for the Pope from St. Peter to the fortress, was created.
    • ST. PETER’S BASILICA The St. Peter’s Basilica is the seat of the main events of the Roman Catholic Church and is therefore used for the solemn celebrations: Christmas, Easter and the Holy Week rituals, proclamation of new popes and funerals of deceased ones, opening and closing of Jubilees. Under the pontificate of Pius IX it hosted the sessions of Vatican Council, under Pope John XXIII and Paul VI the Second Vatican Council.
    • APOSTOLIC PALACE The Apostolic Palace, also called the Papal Palace or the Vatican Palace, is the official residence of the Pope in Vatican City. Before 1871 the official residence of the Pope was Palazzo del Quirinale. After the fall of the Papal States in 1870, the King of Italy seized the building in 1871 for his official residence. After the abolition of the monarchy in 1946, it became the residence of the President of the Republic.
    • MODERN AGE PALACES The word "palace" comes from the Latin name for the Palatine Hill in Rome (Palatium), where in the imperial age had developed structures of the official residence of the emperors (Domus Augustana). The name of the hill became for excellence that of any royal and princely residence. The building is a building of large proportions and architectural value. The palace was once used as a residence of kings, princes and gentlemen, today is mostly used as a place of public office or place of representation by private entities such as banks and foundations.
    • PALAZZO PALAZZO DEL MADAMA PALZZO QUIRINALE MONTECITORIO PALZZO DEL PALZZO VIMINALE POLITICAL POWER CHIGI PALAZZO DEL PALZZO DELLA CAMPIDOGLIO PALZZO FARNESINA SPADA
    • PALAZZO MADAMA Palazzo Madama is located in Corso Rinascimento, a few meters from Piazza Navona. It currently houses the Senate with the assembly hall, some parliamentary groups, the offices of the President and Secretary General, and some offices and services closely related to parliamentary activity.
    • PALAZZO MONTECITORIO The history of the building began in the first half of 15° century when Innocent X commissioned Gian Lorenzo Bernini to build a residence for the family Ludovisi. Montecitorio houses the Chamber of Deputies. The most important reception rooms are on the second floor along with the offices of the President, members of the Executive and the Secretary.
    • STATELY ROOMS A monumental staircase leads to the so-called corridor of busts, where bronze and marble busts of distinguished men are exposed. Another exhibition room is called “Sala della Lupa“. It’s the largest salon of the Bernini wing, which owes its name to the a bronze sculpture of the Capitoline She-wolf.
    • PALAZZO CHIGI Palazzo Chigi, seat of the Italian government since 1961, is a historical building located in the city centre. The main entrance is in the "Column" square in front of Marcus Aurelius Column. Until 17th century it was situated along Via del Corso.
    • PALAZZO DELLA FARNESINA Palazzo della Farnesina, often simply called Farnesina, houses the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It is located between Monte Mario and the Tiber in the area of Foro Italico.
    • PALAZZO SPADA Palazzo Spada houses the Council of State. It is located in Piazza Capo di Ferro. It was originally built in 1540 for Cardinal Girolamo Capodiferro (1501-1559) by the architects Bartolomeo Baronino and Giulio Mazzoni. The building was bought by Cardinal Spada in 1632. Spada commissioned Francesco Borromini to modify it according to new tastes. Palazzo Spada was purchased with all furnishings and the gallery, by the Italian state in 1927.
    • CAPITOL HILL The remains of the ancient Tabularium were used as a fortified residence by the Corsi family. With the rise of communal institutions, in 1144 the palace became the seat of the reconstituted Senate. It underwent several changes and additions and the new buildings of Palace of the Conservatives and the New Palace, which currently house the Capitoline Museums. The square, built from a design by Michelangelo, was decorated with the famous equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius and a new staircase, the Cordonata was built which allowed people to climb up the hill even on horseback. The Campidoglio houses Rome’s City Council. Both the English words Capitol (government administration), and Capital ( capital city) derives from the Capitol Hill.
    • PALAZZO DEL QUIRINALE The Palazzo del Quirinale is situated on the hill with the same name. It Is the official residence of the President of the Italian Republic and one of the symbols of the Italian State.
    • PALAZZO DEL VIMINALE The Palazzo del Viminale is a historic palace. Since 1925 it was first the seat of the Prime minister then the seat of the Ministry of Interior of the Italian Republic. In 1961 the Prime Minister moved to Palazzo Chigi leaving just the Ministry of Interior there.