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PALAZZO Medici
RiccARdi
Santosh Kumar meena
Rashi varshney
Piyush Kumar pandey
Places, Architecture:
Courtyard of the Columns (also known as ‘Michelozzo courtyard’)
Author, circle:
Michelozzo (Florence...
Michelozzo Bartolomeo
 Michelozzo(1396-1472), a student of Brunelleschi,
worked not only in France but also in other nort...
The Palazzo Medici- History:
 The palace was designed by Michelozzo di
Bartolomeo for Cosimo de' Medici, head of the
Medi...
•The palazzo has a square plan including a
•central courtyard serving as a circulation core
•for perimeter rooms that open...
PLAN OF MICHELOZZO PALAZZO MEDICI RICCARDI
 Michelozzo di Bartolomeo was influenced in his building of this
palace by both classical Roman and Brunelleschian princi...
The ground floor originally had 3 open arches along the street, the
central one giving access to the courtyard and rooms s...
Description, subject:
The porticoes courtyard (also known as
“Courtyard of the columns”) is the fulcrum of
Palazzo Medici....
Palazzo medicci
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Palazzo medicci

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Palazzo medicci

  1. 1. PALAZZO Medici RiccARdi Santosh Kumar meena Rashi varshney Piyush Kumar pandey
  2. 2. Places, Architecture: Courtyard of the Columns (also known as ‘Michelozzo courtyard’) Author, circle: Michelozzo (Florence, 1396-1472) Commissioner, collector: Cosimo ill Vecchio de’ Medici (Florence, 1389- Careggi/Florence, 1464) Epoch, date: c. 1450 Location: Florence, Via Cavour no. 1, Palazzo Medici Riccardi Technical details: on the plan: 24.89x20.12 m (maximum width); 11.38x11.35 m (area comprised between the coluPlaces, Architecture: Courtyard of the Columns (also known as ‘Michelozzo courtyard’) Author, circle: Michelozzo (Florence, 1396-1472) Commissioner, collector: Cosimo il Vecchio de’ Medici (Florence, 1389- Careggi/Florence, 1464) Epoch, date: c. 1450 Location: Florence, Via Cavour no. 1, Palazzo Medici Riccardi Technical details: on the plan: 24.89x20.12 m (maximum width); 11.38x11.35 m (area comprised between the columns); height: 7.52 m (maximum height).mns); height: 7.52 m (maximum height).
  3. 3. Michelozzo Bartolomeo  Michelozzo(1396-1472), a student of Brunelleschi, worked not only in France but also in other northern Italian cities. Although not so celebrated a designer as Brunelleschi, Michelozzo was a capable architect and was awarded several commissions by those archetypal Renaissance patrons, the Medici. Most noteworthy of these was the Palazzo Medici in Florence.
  4. 4. The Palazzo Medici- History:  The palace was designed by Michelozzo di Bartolomeo for Cosimo de' Medici, head of the Medici banking family, and was built between 1445 and 1460. The client did not want to arouse feelings of envy among other important families in the city, so he rejected Brunelleschi earlier design because it was too lavish and magnificent. Palazzo Medici Riccardi has a particularly fascinating history, rich in art and also in political, cultural and worldly events. The building became the prototype of Renaissance civil architecture.
  5. 5. •The palazzo has a square plan including a •central courtyard serving as a circulation core •for perimeter rooms that open to one another without a continues corridor. •Michelozzo made use of rustication. He arranged the street elevation in three tiers of graduated textures , beginning with rock faced stone at the street level and concluding with smooth ashlar at the third level below a 10- foot-high crowning cornice with modillions, egg-and-dart moldings, and a dentil course. The tripartite elevation used here expresses the Renaissance spirit of rationality, order, and classicism on human scale. The cornice projects 8 feet from the building supported on large brackets. The façade is 83 feet high PLAN
  6. 6. PLAN OF MICHELOZZO PALAZZO MEDICI RICCARDI
  7. 7.  Michelozzo di Bartolomeo was influenced in his building of this palace by both classical Roman and Brunelleschian principles. During the Renaissance revival of classical culture, ancient Roman elements were often replicated in architecture, both built and imagined in paintings. In the Palazzo Medici Riccardi, the rusticated masonry and the cornice had precedents in Roman practice, yet in totality it looks distinctly Florentine, unlike any known Roman building.  Similarly, the early Renaissance architect Brunelleschi used Roman techniques and influenced Michelozzo. The open colonnaded court that is the center of the palazzo plan has roots in the cloisters that developed from Roman peristyles.
  8. 8. The ground floor originally had 3 open arches along the street, the central one giving access to the courtyard and rooms serving the Medici banking business. From the courtyard a staircase led to the major family rooms on the 2nd floor. Deep shadows in the courtyard make the palazzo's core cool and quiet. Typical Romanesque windows with circular heads are used throughout. While without radical innovations, the Medici Palace reflects Michelozzo’s connection to renaissance circles through its symmetry, inclusion of classical elements, and careful use of mathematical proportions. ELEVATION:
  9. 9. Description, subject: The porticoes courtyard (also known as “Courtyard of the columns”) is the fulcrum of Palazzo Medici. An elegant and highly suggestive space, it was designed and built by Michelozzo . The courtyard is characterized by a broad colonnade that runs around the perimeter, bordered on each side by four monolithic columns in pieta serena sandstone, surmounted by Composite capitals supporting three round arches. Supported on the upper cornice are several mullioned windows, similar to those on the outer facade, where the central column is surmounted by a Corinthian capital. The three levels of the facade therefore illustrate the succession of the three architectural orders, indicative of the usage of the adjacent areas: Composite for the representation area of the courtyard, Corinthian for the first floor and Ionic for the loggia giving access to the service quarters.

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