Mise en scene
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Mise en scene

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Examples of mise-en-scene and Lighting

Examples of mise-en-scene and Lighting

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Mise en scene Mise en scene Presentation Transcript

  • Mise - en -Scene
    • what is it?
    • When applied to the cinema or TV, mise en scène refers to everything that appears before the camera and its arrangement – set, props, actors, costumes, and lighting.
    • Overall, mise en scène is used when the director wishes to give an impression of the characters or situation without vocally articulating it through the framework of spoken dialogue.
    View slide
    • The common example is that of a cluttered, disorganized apartment being used to reflect the disorganization in a character's life in general, or a spartanly decorated apartment to convey a character with an "empty soul", in both cases specifically and intentionally ignoring any practicality in the setting.
    View slide
  • So how do we decode what we see on screen?
    • Everything we see on screen could be termed a sign . From a type of gun, car, wristwatch, jacket to a haircut, all these are signs.
    • These signs signify something, the physical object creates a series of thoughts in our mind, which when combined with the context in which they are placed help the film maker tell the story with great efficiency.
    • The meaning is determined through a set of conventions created and understood by the audience, according to its combined social and cultural background. Shared meaning is thus given to these signs.
  • Denotation & Connotation
    • Denotation tends to be described as the definitional, 'literal', 'obvious' or 'commonsense' meaning of a sign.
    • In this case a gun is simply a gun, a method of killing - intimidating.
    • The term connotation is used to refer to the socio-cultural and 'personal' associations (ideological, emotional etc.) of the sign. These are typically related to the interpreter's class, age, gender, ethnicity and so on.
    • In this case the type/style of gun tells us much about its user, James Bond ’ s Walther vs. Dirty Harry ’ s Magnum for example.
  • So….
  • Deconstruct this..... Jungle = wildness / inhospitable Anne ’ s clothing = lingerie = inappropriate/sexual/ vulnerable - also soiled suggesting signs of struggle Hair, dirty, wet = signifies struggle/weariness
  • Kong ’ s pose= masculine/powerful/savage/petulant Anne = tiny, feminine/ vulnerable/weak out of her depth
  • OVER TO YOU…
  • OVER TO YOU…
  • OVER TO YOU…
  • Lighting
  • What lighting does
    • Picks out relevant details and figures in a scene
    • Prioritises story information for audience
    • Establishes a set of values to what we are seeing, by throwing more and less light on the elements in a scene
    • Enforces emotional pull in a scene, heightening mood and atmosphere
    • Allows camera to see properly on a technical level
    • Creates a look for the film
    • The three light source set up, Key light, Fill and backlight
    • Using a combination of these allows the creation of atmosphere/mood, and the display of sufficient detail to allow the story to be told effectively
    LIGHTING TERMS
  • LIGHTING TERMS
    • Key light Principal illumination source on a subject or scene. Normally positioned slightly off-center and angled to provide shadow detail.
    • Back light Lamp providing illumination from behind. Creates sense of depth by separating foreground subject from background area. Applied erroneously, causes severe silhouette.
    • Fill light Supplementary illumination, usually from a soft light positioned to the side of the subject, which lightens shadows created by the key light.
  • In a TV/variety/gameshow setup, elimination of shadow is important
  • But in film, shadow can be used as part of the storytelling technique - connotation here? Key Back fill
  • OTHER LIGHTING TERMS
    • Ambient Light A light that doesn't highlight any one subject for a natural room light effect. Usually a non-directional light.
    • Artificial light Man-made illumination not limited to "indoor" variety: fluorescent bulbs, jack-o'-lanterns and a car's headlights all qualify.
    • Directional light Light that illuminates a relatively small area with distinct light beam; usually created with spotlight, yields harsh, defined shadows.