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GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
GAY LUSSAC LAW
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GAY LUSSAC LAW

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used determine the relationship between pressure and temperature at constant volume of an ideal gas

used determine the relationship between pressure and temperature at constant volume of an ideal gas

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  • 1. Koya University Faulty of Engineering School of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering Chemical Engineering department EXPERIMENT NUMBER THREE GAY LUSSAC LAW Thermodynamics GAY LUSSAC LAW Instructor: Mr.Rebwar & Mr.Omer Author Name: Aree Salah Tahir Experiment Contacted on: 19/nov/2013 Report Submitted on: 26/nov /2013 Group:A
  • 2. List of content: Abstract ………………………………….….2 Objectives……………………………….…...3 Introduction …………………………………4 Background Theory …………………….5 & 6 Method …………………………………7 & 8 Calculation…………………………….9 & 10 Equipment and components used…………..11 Discussion …..…………………12 & 13 & 14 References …………………………………15
  • 3. Abstract: Gay-Lussac's 1801 experiments establishing the law of volumes for gases are brilliantly simple, and he described them with a level of detail that was new to physics writing. But he did not present his actual measurements or tell us how he analyzed them to conclude that between 0 to 100 °C, a volume of any gas will expand by about 37.5%. We review his experiments and conclude that he measured initial and final volumes at slightly different pressures. By using the gas laws and his apparatus diagrams, we corrected his data so that they correspond to constant pressure. His corrected results give ΔV/V=36.6%, the currently accepted value for nearly ideal gases. Aside from their intrinsic interest, our analyses can provide students intriguing applications of the gas laws and Pascal's law and motivate them to consider Pascal's paradox. We also note the influence of ballooning and of the French Revolution on GayLussac.{ 1 } 2
  • 4. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this experiment is to determine the relationship between pressure and temperature at constant volume of an ideal gas.{ 2 } 3
  • 5. Introduction: When you have a can of soda or beer, and you heat it too much by leaving it in your car or out in the sunlight for too long a period of time, you may find an unpleasant surprise when you return to fetch it, as people have found out here and here. The amount of liquid in the can hasn't grown. Instead, the carbon dioxide inside has been agitated thermally, thus increasing the pressure, and you then have to deal with the messy results of container bursting due to this increase in kinetic energy. Inconvenient incidences of pressurized containers exploding when they are heated may be explained by the Law of Gay-Lussac. Gay-Lussac's Law is the third and final of the laws leading up to the ideal gas law. The first is Boyle's Law, which gives the relationship between volume and pressure, and the second is Charles' Law, which gives the relationship between volume and temperature. Gay-Lussac's Law has also been referred to as Charles' Law, but they are not the same.{3} 4
  • 6. BACKGROUND THEORY: Gay-Lussac law is also commonly known as Charles’s law. The law explains about the relationship between pressure and temperature of gases. The law was established in the early19th century by Jacques Charles and Joseph Louis GayLussac who did a study on the effect of temperature on the volume of a sample of gas subjected to constant pressure (Atkins,2002). Charles did the original work, which was then verified by Gay-Lussac (grc.nasa.gov). However, in this lab practical, we are dealing with an alternative version of Charles’s law instead. The volume is kept constant in change for pressure instead as the objective of the experiment is to determine the relationship between pressure and temperature of ideal gas. The expression is as shown: p = constant x T (at constant volume) This version of law also indicates that the pressure of gas falls to zero as the temperature is reduced to zero (Atkins, 2002). Thus it can be seen that gas pressure and the temperature are directly proportional tone another. When the pressure increases, the temperature also increases, and vice versa. 5
  • 7. P ∝T P = constant T P/T = constant P1/T1= P2/T2 P1T2= P2T1 The equations above apply in the gas of dealing with the relationship between pressure and temperature of a gas Mathematical/Graphical relationship between pressure of a fixed mass of gas with temperature at a constant volume is linear. The volume is constant. { 4 } 6
  • 8. Method: Heating: 1.switch on unit at master switch. 2.open air discharge valve on the lid of the heatable cylinder and set the vessel to ambient pressure . 3.close air discharge valve again. 4.set the required final temperature on the heating regulator using the arrow keys 5.start data acquisition program and make the corresponding settings. 6.switch on heater and operate as long as necessary until the final temperature is reached. 7.open graph of measured values and interpret. 8. leave the cylinder unchanged and continue immediately with the cooling experiment . 7
  • 9. Cooling 1.switch off heated 2.open air discharge valve on the lid of the heatable cylinder and set the vessel to ambient pressure. 3.close air discharge valve again. 4. start data acquisition program and make the corresponding settings. 5.leave the vessel to cool to ambient temperature . 6. open graph of measured values and interpret. 7.open air discharge valve on the lid of the cylinder and set the vessel to ambient pressure . 8.switch off unit at master switch. 8
  • 10. EQUIPMENT & COMPONENTS USED: (1) Tank 1 for isothermal change of state, (2) Digital displays, (3) 5/2-way valve for switching between compression and expansion, (4) Heating controller, (5) Digital display, (6) Tank 2 for isochoric change of state (7) Red switch to on and off the machine{5} 11
  • 11. Discussion: 1/Heating: 12
  • 12. Cooling: There are many erorrs in the chart because of mistakes in the machine and the heater. 13
  • 13. 1/ What restrictions are there on the use of Gay-Lussac's law of combining volumes? It applies only to gases measured under the same temperature and pressure. 2/ At the same temperature and pressure, what is the relationship between the volume of a gas and the number of molecules present? The volume varies directly with the number of molecules. 3/ What is Gay-Lussac's Law? the density of an ideal gas at constant pressure varies inversely with its temperature. Formulated by Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac, this means that for any given amount of ideal gas held at a constant volume, the pressure is proportional to the absolute temperature. 4/why it is double glass? For safty because maybe the inner glass will explode 5/why do we have too much erorrs? Because of the machines' getting old and the room temperatur 14
  • 14. References: 1: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aapt/journal/ajp/79/1/10.1119/1.3485034 2: http://www.scribd.com/doc/177444955/The-Perfect-Gas-Expansion-Experiment-TH-11 3: http://www.brighthubengineering.com/hvac/26213-gay-lussacs-law/#imgn_0 4: http://www.scribd.com/doc/177444955/The-Perfect-Gas-Expansion-Experiment-TH-11 5:http://www.gunt.de/networks/gunt/sites/s1/templates/scripts/picDetail.php?actEntry=3438&lang=1&di r=06010200&src=Zeichnung.jpg&color=FF6633&software=1 15

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