Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Career keys slides
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Career keys slides

419

Published on

2 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
419
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
2
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • With the almost overnight shift from assemblers and exporters of technology to heavy users of technology, vast cultural transformations have taken place. Wages have increased, working hours have increased, number of mothers in the workforce has increased and a whole array of Western influences have gushed in – fashion, music, fast food, new ways of thinking, values.Technology – Asian parents want their children more versed in technologyGlobal Skills – Be prepared to meet the new world and able to work with people of diverse backgroundsAnalytical & Life Skills – Go beyond factual knowledge by gaining strong analytical, creativity and team skillsAsian values – honesty, respect, close family ties. Downsides of technology: addictions to online games/ pornography. Downsides of Global Skills: Fear of losing their children to the world as they forget their home roots. Fear of losing the “Asian values”
  • It was their way of saying, “These are the traits we want in our employees, so it would be nice if schools could somehow produce these same traits in their students and graduates.”
  • Partnership for 21st Century Skills is a national organization; a joint undertaking between businesses and educators. The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes (a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century. The key elements of 21st century learning are represented in the graphic and descriptions below. The graphic represents both 21st century skills student outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and 21st century skills support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom).
  • Since not all four of these needs are met in every home, many students come to school hungry for them. Teachers oftentimes find themselves having to meet these needs.One of the most harmful form of identity theft in today’s society is not what is happening in our economy but in our youth. Youths are pressured into becoming somebody other than who they in their heart of hearts want to be. Youths are deprived of their feelings of worth and uniqueness.
  • Work to LiveMay be that your life’s centre is outside your work. You are more motivated by the things you do outside work than the things which earn you a living – your salary I simply to fund your dream. But some may feel that something vital is missing and may also struggle to define it.Live to WorkYou may have found the best job in the world. There are dangers here too and your work/ life balance may need adjustment. Perhaps work plays too important a part in your life? – sometimes at the expense of family or personal development.
  • Since not all four of these needs are met in every home, many students come to school hungry for them. Teachers oftentimes find themselves having to meet these needs.One of the most harmful form of identity theft in today’s society is not what is happening in our economy but in our youth. Youths are pressured into becoming somebody other than who they in their heart of hearts want to be. Youths are deprived of their feelings of worth and uniqueness.
  • http://www.thinkarete.com/wisdom/works/notes/1430/http://www.wonderbrains.com/articles/multiple-intelligences-primer.htmlhttp://www.personal.psu.edu/staff/b/x/bxb11/MI/MITypes.htm
  • Transcript

    1. CareerKeys & LearningKeysOUTLINE | CAREERKEYS : DONALD SUPER’S CAREER STUDY PATTERN C AREER K EYS & L EARNING K EYS F OR CAREER CONSULTANTS
    2. Dr. Benny Lim Headof School, School of Communication and Creative Arts kwlim@kdu.edu.my
    3. WHAT PARENTS, BUSINESS LEADERS AND TEACHERS WANT FROM A SCHOOL Global Technology WHAT Skills ASIAN PARENTS WANT Analytical Asian & Life Values SkillsFor an example of the trends in Asia and how they are impacting education in Taiwan, see Troy E. Beckert et al.,“Parent Expectations of Young Children in Taiwan,” in Early Childhood Research & Practice 6 (2004).
    4. ADULT ATTITUDES ON EDUCATION % who rank this skill as a 9 or 10 in importance on a scale of 0 to 10Reading Comprehension 75Computer and technology 71Critical thinking & problem solving skills 69Ethics and social responsibility 62Written communications 58Teamwork and collaboration 57Oral communications 56Lifelong learning and self-direction 50Mathematics 48Leadership 44Creativity and innovation 43Media literacy 42Global awareness 42Science (biology, chemistry and physics) 38 The Partnership for 21st Century Skills – sponsored Survey of American Adult Attitudes Toward Education was conducted by Public Opinion Strategies and Peter D. Hart Research Associates from September 10 to 12 2007.
    5. WHAT PARENTS, BUSINESS LEADERS AND TEACHERS WANT FROM A SCHOOL • Communication Skills (verbal and written) TOP 10 • Honesty/ Integrity • Teamwork skillsQUALITIES & • Interpersonal skills SKILLS • Self-motivation/ InitiativeEMPLOYERS • Strong work ethic SEEK • Analytical skills • Technology skills • Organizational skills • Creative mindsSource from National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).
    6. WHAT PARENTS, BUSINESS LEADERS AND TEACHERS WANT FROM A SCHOOL FRAMEWORK FOR 21ST CENTURY
    7. WHAT DO STUDENTS WANT? Four Basic NeedsPHYSICALSafety, good health, food, exercise, shelter andhygieneSOCIO-EMOTIONALAcceptance, kindness, friendship, the desire to loveand to be lovedMENTALIntellectual growth, creativity, and stimulatingchallengesSPIRITUALContribution, meaning, and uniqueness
    8. C
    9. YOUR BEHAVIOUR | YOUR ABILITIES | YOUR INTERESTS | YOUR TALENTS | YOUR EXPERIENCE | YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES 6 FACTORS TO C ONSIDER W HEN DECIDING YOUR C AREER
    10. 1. YOUR BEHAVIOUR – Type of productive activity with which your personality style typically excels and finds enjoyable2. YOUR ABILITIES – Natural intellectual aptitude and physical abilities to perform well in a given area3. YOUR INTERESTS – Type of work that holds your interest, motivates you and keeps you fulfilled
    11. 4. YOUR TALENTS – Your natural gifts and talents, e.g. voice, artistic, athletic or physical ability5. YOUR EXPERIENCE – Skills/trades you have already developed and with which you can build upon in the future6. YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES – Time, money, energy you have to pursue your desires
    12. CareerKeysOUTLINE | CAREERKEYS : DONALD SUPER’S CAREER STUDY PATTERN CAREERKEYS
    13. Do you work to live orlive to work?
    14. DONALD SUPER’S C AREER PATTERN STUDY A longitudinal study of100 men from ninth grade through age 35
    15. DONALD SUPER’S C AREER THEORY(A MMUNDSON , N.E., H ARRIS -B OWLSBEY, J., & N ILES , S.G., 2005)One’s career is influenced and mediated by one’s self-concept
    16. DONALD SUPER’S C AREER THEORY(A MMUNDSON , N.E., H ARRIS -B OWLSBEY, J., & N ILES , S.G., 2005) Career development is a lifelong process
    17. DONALD SUPER’S C AREER THEORY(A MMUNDSON , N.E., H ARRIS -B OWLSBEY, J., & N ILES , S.G., 2005) Career is more than a job. It is the combination of all of the activities that take place in life roles being played by an individual at a given point in time.
    18. SUPER’S C AREER DEVELOPMENT STAGES Growth (roughly to age 11), Exploration (approximately 11-20), Establishment (20 to mid-adulthood), Maintenance (mid to late adulthood), Disengagement (late adulthood).
    19. SUPER’S C AREER DEVELOPMENTA critical notion within Super’s theory isthat, in making a vocational choice, an individual is expressing his or her self-concept. Thus, it is critical that students have accurate knowledgeabout themselves, or they may choose occupations that do not match well with their interests and skills.
    20. Research Paper: Stratton’s (2000) research paper, “Muddling Through: What DoTeens Want from Career Counsellors?” WHAT DO TEENS WANT FROM CAREER COUNSELLORS
    21. 3 Important Dimensions of Education and Career Development & Counselling Concerns about the Future Changing & Unrealistic Career Aspirations Information Gathering & Decision Making Process
    22. Stratton’s (2000) research paper, “Muddling Through: What Do Teens Want from Career Counsellors?” • Concerns about the Future When making plans for the future, it was found that students reported their three greatest concerns as: • being able to find a job they like (82%); • affordability to go to college or university (65%); • and having the right results they wanted (59%).
    23. Stratton’s (2000) research paper, “Muddling Through: What Do Teens Want from Career Counsellors?” • Changing and Unrealistic Career Aspirations Students change career ideas or intended college and university programmes because it is expected of them rather than because they are deeply committed to that career goal. Also, the research revealed that many students set unrealistic career goals. Clearly, they need more focused information about how educational choices and career goals relate.
    24. Stratton’s (2000) research paper, “Muddling Through: What Do Teens Want from Career Counsellors?” • Information Gathering and Decision Making Process The research also showed that teenagers gather information and make decision that involves multiple sources. The two greatest influences on student decisions were perceptions of interest and ability.
    25. Career ConsultingCAREER DEVELOPMENT CYCLE | FAMOUS BRANDS | WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BRAND? | WHAT IS YOUR IDEAL WORK? C AREER C ONSULTING
    26. C AREER D EVELOPMENT C YCLE United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. (2002). Handbook on career counselling: A practical manual for developing, implementing and assessing career counselling services in higher education settings. Paris
    27. FAMOUS B RANDS YOU?
    28. WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BRAND? It is your unique combination of your attributes and achievements. It is what your potential employers will hire.
    29. WHAT IS YOUR IDEAL WORK? Talents & Skills Your Ideal Work Interests Values
    30. Looking for a JobGROUP ACTIVITY WAYS IN WHICH JOB - HUNTERS L OOK FOR JOBS
    31. Resumes Referrals Sending in resume to get invited Asking friends about job vacancies they for an interview may know of, at other workplaces AdvertisementClassified ads or posting on the Internet Contacts Using a friend or colleague for direct introduction to potential employers Agencies Applying through employment agencies, search firms Inside the Company Work inside a company as a temp Friends worker, short-term contract and hoping to Asking friends about job vacancies be eventually “hired from within” where they work because you are already working there Adapted from “What Colour is Your Parachute?” – A Practical Manual for Job – Hunters and Career Changers by Richard Nelson Bolles (2007)
    32. G ROUP ACTIVITY a. In your group, discuss and arrange in order of preference (1 being most preferred and 7 being least preferred), the ways (listed in the previous slide) a job hunter would use in looking for a job. b. Discuss and arrange in order of preference (1 being most preferred and 7 being least preferred), the ways an employer would use in looking for a potential employee.
    33. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS | STRENGTHS | MOTIVATION | IDEAL ENVIRONMENT | GENERAL OCCUPATIONS DISC P ERSONALITY P ROFILING
    34. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICSGoal Oriented CreativeResult-oriented MotivationalSelf-confident Polished, Poised Decisive Enthusiastic Strong-willed PersuasiveOrganises Well Independent D I Popular Verbal ThoroughDetail-oriented C S Organised Loyal Predictable Economical Cautious Steady Neat Patient Systematic Dependable Accurate Systematic
    35. STRENGTHS Lead/ Manage Communicator Delegates Great encourager Confronts others Motivates others to achieve Innovative Positive sense of humour Problem Solver Peacemaker Risk-taker Self-starter D I People person Good sales person C S Ability to think Ability to administer objectively Mediates problems, Quality Control coordinate tasks Thorough in work Compliant to authorityAbility to organise data Good listener Defines situation Good at recognising conflict Understands & use Friendlycharts, graphs, figures Team player
    36. MOTIVATION New challenges & Flattery, praise, popularity, problems acceptance, approval Power & authority to Friendly environment take risks Freedom from manyFreedom from routine & rules and regulations mundane tasks D I Other people available Changing to handle details environments C S High quality Recognition for loyalty standards No sudden changes in Limited social procedure or lifestyle interaction A secure environment with Detailed tasks little conflictLogical organization of Activities one can start information and finish
    37. IDEAL ENVIRONMENT Innovative focus on future Practical proceduresNon-routine, challenging tasks Projects that produce Few conflicts & arguments tangible results Freedom from controls and Freedom from controls, details supervision & details Forum to express ideas Personal evaluation based on results, not methods D I Group activities Projects that can be Team atmosphere followed through to completionSpecialised or technical tasks C S Practical procedure & systems Stability & predictability Practical work procedures Few conflicts & arguments Tasks that can be completed one at a timeReassurance that one is doing what is expected Few conflicts & arguments
    38. GENERAL OCCUPATIONS – ‘D’ S TYLEAdministratorsAthletesCoachesDirectors: leaders, project heads, mediaEntrepreneursExecutives: presidents, vice-presidentsFire-fighters: local or volunteer fighterForemen: leaders in groupsIndependent business/ self-employedJudges: court or justice systemMilitary leaders: all armed forcesNews Anchors: all media organizationsPilots: military or commercialPolice Officers/detectives: enforcementReal estate developer & builder
    39. GENERAL OCCUPATIONS – ‘I’ S TYLEActors/ variety artistsAuctioneersBroadcasters, news readerDisc jockeysEntertainers, clowns & comediansFlight Attendants: stewardsGuides & travel agentsInstructors: educations or businessInterior designersMaster of CeremoniesReceptionistsReportersSales people: good or servicesTeachers: all areas of educationTelemarketers/ phone operators
    40. GENERAL OCCUPATIONS – ‘S’ S TYLEArtists: art, paintingAdministrative staffBeauticians/BarbersCounsellors, social workersCustomer ServiceDiplomats: country ambassadorsEvent plannersLecturer/teacher: school & collegeFlight Attendants,Human Resource Director,Lab techniciansManagers: handle business & peoplePharmacists, Nurses, Real Estate AgentsTraining consultants, trainersVeterinariesWriters: journalists, author
    41. GENERAL OCCUPATIONS – ‘C’ S TYLEAccountants, Airline pilotsArchitects, Interior designersAuthor, journalistBankers, Clerical: officer or retail workersComposers: creators of musicComputer programmers, developersDentists: dental careEducators & teacher: specialist Engineers:specialist in various areasLawyers: advisors in lawLandscape/Nursery architect, designerPerforming artist: presenterPhotographers, PhotojournalistsPhysicians, SurgeonScholars, Scientist
    42. SELF-EVALUATION OF YOUR TALENTS TALENT & SKILLS
    43. Talent = Natural abilityCan never be acquired – it is always innate, intrinsic and inherent in the individual.Skill = Acquired capability It can be learnt.
    44. W HAT ARE YOUR TALENTS?SELF-EVALUATION• ARTISTIC Talents • COUNSELLING/ RELATIONAL Talents• LEADERSHIP Talents • TACTILE Talents• COMMUNICATION Talents • TEACHING Talents• ATHLETIC Talents • SOCIAL Talents• RESEARCH Talents • INTELLECTUAL Talents• MECHANICAL Talents• ORGANIZATION Talents
    45. LINGUISTIC | LOGICAL MATHEMATICAL | VISUAL SPATIAL | MUSICAL | BODILY KINESTHETIC | INTERPERSONAL | INTRAPERSONAL TALENT & S KILLS MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE
    46. LINGUISTIC | LOGICAL MATHEMATICAL | VISUAL SPATIAL | MUSICAL | BODILY KINESTHETIC | INTERPERSONAL | INTRAPERSONAL TALENT & S KILLS MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE
    47. L INGUISTIC I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF WORDS • Appreciate poetry, plays, books and conversation • Fluent talker & can explain things clearly • For studies, make full use of language, both written and spoken, read widely, write notes. • Put your thoughts into words. Explain your ideas to others. Sample Professions: Librarian, archivist, editor, translator, writer, radio/TV announcer, journalist, legal assistant, lawyer, secretary, typist, proofreader, English & Language teacher.
    48. L OGICAL M ATHEMATICAL I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF NUMBERS & LOGIC • Like abstract thinking • Good at solving puzzles and problems • Know how to analyse and interpret data. Sample Professions: auditor, accountant, purchaser, underwriter, mathematician, scientist, statistician, actuary, computer analyst, economist, technician, accounts assistant, science teacher.
    49. V ISUAL S PATIAL I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF PICTURES & IMAGES • Think in pictures and create visual images • Observant with a good sense of direction • Use metaphors. • Use charts, diagrams and mind maps for studies. Sample Professions: engineer, surveyor, architect, urban planner, graphic artist, interior designer, photographer, art teacher, inventor, cartographer, pilot, fine artist, sculptor.
    50. M USICAL I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF MUSIC & RHYTHM • Sensitive to the emotional power of music • Have a good sense of rhythm and melody • Remember songs and may be able to sing Sample Professions: disc jockey, musician, instrument maker, piano tuner, instrument salesperson, songwriter, studio engineer, choral director, conductor, singer, music teacher.
    51. B ODILY K INESTHETIC I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF PHYSICAL SELF • Like to engage in physical sports • Prefer to deal with problems in physical, „hands-on‟ way. • Skillful with your hands and play around with objects while listening. • You fidget if there are few breaks. Sample Professions: physical therapist, recreational worker, dancer, actor, model, mechanic, carpenter, craftsperson, physical education teacher, choreographer, professional athlete.
    52. I NTERPERSONAL I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF UNDERSTANDING PEOPLE • Relate well and like mixing with other people • Have many friends • Good at negotiating • Enjoy group activities and you like to cooperate. Sample Professions: administrator, manager, school principal, personnel, arbitrator, sociologist, counselor, psychologist, nurse, public relations, salesperson, travel agent, social worker.
    53. I NTRAPERSONAL I NTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE OF INNER SELF • Appreciate privacy & quiet for working & thinking • Like to daydream, imagine and fantasize • Understand your own feelings, thoughts & why you do things. Sample Professions: psychologist, clergyperson, psychology teacher, therapist, counselor, program planner, entrepreneur.
    54. VALUES STYLES : LOYALTY | EQUALITY | PERSONAL FREEDOM | JUSTICE VALUES & C AREER C HOICE
    55. VALUES STYLES• We operate on a system of values or invisible motivators that are unique to individuals.• Values styles affect the choices you make, the friends you choose, the career you pursue, your leisure activities, the words you say.•In short, values determine how you live your life.
    56. VALUES S TYLE : LOYALTYOVERVIEW GENERAL CHARACTERISTICSo Focus On Traditions • Focusing on people workingo Outlook Recognizes together for the greater good. established authority • Protecting from challengingo Goal Responsible living situations by responsible livingo Fear Loss of social and pulling together. respect / disloyalty • Avoiding the loss of socialo Work Style Meaningful respect from others. involvement • Following the proper and correct way of doing things in accordance with established rules and authority. •Conforming to traditional patterns through personal commitments and promises.
    57. VALUES S TYLE : EQUALITYOVERVIEW GENERAL CHARACTERISTICSo Focus Self-expression • Focusing on respecting theo Outlook Seeks friendly individuality of others as well as relationships with the self. freedom to be • Respecting individual beliefs. themselves.o Goal Self-assertion and • Searching for personal fulfillment happiness. and making opportunities for meaningful communication witho Fear Inner conflict / others. inequality. • Avoiding inner conflicts.o Work Style Socially-acceptable individuality. • Stretching the rules and expectations within safe boundaries in search of personal satisfaction.
    58. VALUES S TYLE : PERSONAL FREEDOMOVERVIEW GENERAL CHARACTERISTICSo Focus Self-fulfillment • Challenging or questioning theo Outlook Seeks personal existing systems, standards, goals & aspirations rules, and procedures in order too Goal Self-satisfaction increase the boundaries of personal freedom.o Fear Loss of personal well-being • Seeking self-preservation and satisfaction through theo Work Style Self-expressed accomplishments of individuality personal goals. • Preventing the loss of personal well-being. • Expressing energy through creative, untested and non- conventional ideas.
    59. VALUES S TYLE : JUSTICEOVERVIEW GENERAL CHARACTERISTICSo Focus Inner honesty • Finding fulfillment througho Outlook Seeks personal meaningful relationships and acceptance with seeking fair and workable solutions. others for the • Bettering conditions of the common good. environment for the common good,o Goal Acceptance into the even at their own personal expense, group. as long as everyone will benefit.o Fear Lack of personal • Avoiding situations which are harmony & injustice. unjust or conflicting with a senseo Work Style Personal of inner honesty. involvement. • Improving the present quality of life even though the number of personal benefits may be decreased.
    60. W HAT ARE VALUES? Values are deeply held constraints, ideals, convictions, or standards Your values are invisible motivators that influence your choices with regard to occupation, employer, family and community involvement Clarifying your personal values is a critical step toward understanding your own definition of success
    61. THE PARTY EXERCISE | SDS: HOLLAND CODES – R, I , A, S, E, C | YOUR IDEAL WORK I NTEREST S ELF-D IRECTED S EARCH (SDS)
    62. T HE PARTY EXERCISE• The next slide show an aerial view of a room in which a 2-day party is taking place• People with the same or similar interests have (for some reason) gathered in the same corner of the room• Which corner of the room would you instinctively be drawn to, as the group of people you would enjoy being for the longest time? (put aside any question of shyness, or whether you would have to talk to them).• Write the letter for that corner down
    63. R I People who have People who like to athletic or mechanical observe, learn investigate, ability, prefer to work analyze, evaluate or solve with objects, machines, problems. tools , plants or animals, or to be outdoors. People who like to People who have artistic, work with data, have clerical innovating or intuitionalC or numerical ability, carrying things out in detail, or abilities, and like to work in unstructured situations, A following through on others’ using their imagination or instructions. creativity. People who like to work with people – influencing, People who like to work persuading or performing or with people – to inform, leading or managing for enlighten, help, train, organizational goals or develop, or cure them, or for economic gain. are skilled with words. E S
    64. T HE PARTY EXERCISE…C ON’T• After 15 minutes, everyone in the corner you have chosen leaves for another party, except you. Of the groups that still remain now, which corner would you be most drawn to the most, as the people you would most enjoy being with the longest time? Write down the letter.• After 15 minutes, this group too leaves for another party, except you. Of the groups that still remain now, which corner would you be most enjoy being with the longest time? Write down the letter.
    65. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES• Dr John Holland, a psychologist researched the factors that promoted or prevented job satisfaction• He found that people are happiest when they work in places that engages their abilities, and feel satisfied, and avoid tasks they don‟t like.• Holland summarized his theory that people and occupations could be grouped into six basic types, identified by RIASEC • Realistic: Practical, concrete, thing-oriented • Investigative: Analytical, rational, introverted • Artistic: Creative, independent, nonconforming • Social: Cooperative, friendly, people-oriented • Enterprising: Persuasive, competitive, confident • Conventional: Organized, practical, conforming• Your vocation interests will be a combination of varying degrees of several types
    66. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES Realistic (R) Realistic people like physical activity, working with hands & practical work. They like structure, clear goals, straightforward tasks with observable, immediate and tangible results. Job examples: cook, baker, driver, electrician, pilot, plumber, firefighter, landscaper, mechanic, welder
    67. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES Investigative (I) Investigative people prefer unstructured environments that are academic and/ or involve research. You like to solve puzzles. Range of interests includes mathematics, technology, science and related fields. Curiosity about the physical world motivates you to get satisfaction from a job well done, rather than the approval of others. Job examples: economist, chemist, biologist, computer programmer, engineer, scientist, business planner
    68. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES Artistic (A) Artistic people wants to express themselves and your ideas through creative work like visual art, music, dance, acting, discussion or debate. They prefer unstructured, flexible environments without having to follow strict rules or procedures Job examples: actor, artist, composer, dancer, designer, musician singer, photographer, reporter
    69. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES Social (S) Social people prefer activities that involve interaction with people. Activities may include areas like teaching, health care, religious or other people-centred work. Job examples: nurse, teacher, child care provider,counsellor, social worker, clergy, therapist (physical, speech)
    70. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES Enterprising (E) Enterprising people are inclined towards enterprising interests like to lead and persuade others and areprobably confident, assertive, competitive and adventurous. Job examples: athlete, travel agent, management, sales, retail, business owner or entrepreneur
    71. SDS : H OLLAND C ODES Conventional (C) Conventional people prefer structured, business-like work environments. They are found in occupations related to accounting or business and in computational, secretarial or clerical positions. They like maintenance or administrative tasks where they can attend to details, day-to-day operations and bottom-line results. Job examples: accountant, admin assistant, auditor, bank teller, cashier, economist, financial analyst
    72. YOUR IDEAL WORK Talents & Skills Your Ideal Work Interests Values
    73. STRENGTHS INITIATE Bottom-line organizer Creative problem solverPlaces high value on time Motivates others to achieve Challenges status quo Positive sense of humour Problem Solver Peacemaker Innovative Great encourager Risk-taker Self-starter D I Good sales person People personTASK C S PEOPLE Creative thinker Team player Conscientious Loyal worker Thorough in work Reliable & dependable Ability to organise data Has administrative abilities The anchor of reality Good listenerGathering, analyzing and Peacemaker testing of information RESPOND Friendly
    74. MOTIVATED BY New challenges & problems INITIATE Flattery, praise,Power & authority to take risks popularity Freedom from routine & Friendly environment mundane tasks Freedom from many rules Changing environments and regulations D I in which to Other people available work & play to handle details TASK C S PEOPLE High quality Recognition for loyalty standards No sudden changes in Limited social interaction procedure or lifestyle Detailed tasks A secure environment with little conflict Logical organization of information Activities one can start RESPOND and finish
    75. IDEAL ENVIRONMENT Innovative focus on future INITIATENon-routine, challenging tasks Practical procedures Projects that produce Few conflicts & arguments tangible results Freedom from controls and Freedom from controls, details supervision & details Forum to express ideas D I Personal evaluation based on results, Group activities not methods TASK C S PEOPLE Practical work Team atmosphere procedures Practical procedure Few conflicts & arguments & systems Projects that can be Stability & predictabilityfollowed through to completion Specialised or technical tasks Tasks that can be completed one at a time Reassurance that one is doing what is expected Few conflicts & arguments RESPOND
    76. Steve Job’s QuotesConnecting the dots. Follow your heart.
    77. Steve Job’s Quotes You got to find what you love.The only way to be truly satisfiedis to do what you believe is great work…and the only way to dogreat work is to love what you do.
    78. Steve Job’s QuotesYour time is limited.Don’t waste it livingsomeone else’s life.
    79. Steve Job’s QuotesStay hungry,Stay foolish.

    ×