T OPOLOG Y
Introductio n : <ul><li>A  topology  is concerned with the physical arrangement of the network components. </li></ul><ul><...
Bus   T opology <ul><li>It connects each computer (node) to a single segment trunk.   </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘ trunk ’ is a c...
Local   bus <ul><li>each computer is attached directly to the backbone in a daisy-chain configuration by means of a  &quot...
Regular   Bus <ul><li>In a  regular bus , each computer is attached to the cable segment (called a backbone) by means of a...
S tar  T opolog y <ul><li>All of the stations in a  star topology  are connected to a central unit called a  hub   </li></...
Ring   Topology <ul><li>consists of a set of stations connected serially by cable </li></ul><ul><li>other words, it’s a ci...
<ul><li>The central connector is not called a hub but a  Multistation Access Unit  or  MAU . </li></ul><ul><li>all the sta...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Topology

836

Published on

Thanks to the authors

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
836
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
58
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Topology

  1. 1. T OPOLOG Y
  2. 2. Introductio n : <ul><li>A topology is concerned with the physical arrangement of the network components. </li></ul><ul><li>The connection between the devices on a local area network. </li></ul><ul><li>three basic network topologies are </li></ul><ul><li>the bus, the star, and the ring. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Bus T opology <ul><li>It connects each computer (node) to a single segment trunk. </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘ trunk ’ is a communication line, typically coax cable, that is referred to as the ‘bus .’  </li></ul><ul><li>The signal travels from one end of the bus to the other. </li></ul><ul><li>signals are broadcast to all stations </li></ul>
  4. 4. Local bus <ul><li>each computer is attached directly to the backbone in a daisy-chain configuration by means of a &quot;T&quot; connector . </li></ul><ul><li>Peer-to-peer networks are often configured as a local bus. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Regular Bus <ul><li>In a regular bus , each computer is attached to the cable segment (called a backbone) by means of a drop cable (a shorter cable connecting the computer to the backbone). </li></ul>
  6. 6. S tar T opolog y <ul><li>All of the stations in a star topology are connected to a central unit called a hub </li></ul><ul><li>offers a common connection for all stations on the network </li></ul><ul><li>Each station has its own direct cable connection to the hub . </li></ul><ul><li>more cable is required than for a bus topology. </li></ul><ul><li>This eliminates the single point of failure problem associated with the bus topology. </li></ul><ul><li>the signal is split and sent out simultaneously to all stations. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  7. 7. Ring Topology <ul><li>consists of a set of stations connected serially by cable </li></ul><ul><li>other words, it’s a circle or ring of computers. </li></ul><ul><li>There are no terminated ends to the cable; the signal travels around the circle in a clockwise </li></ul><ul><li>this topology functions logically as ring, it is physically wired as a star </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>The central connector is not called a hub but a Multistation Access Unit or MAU . </li></ul><ul><li>all the stations are individually connected to a central location. </li></ul><ul><li>In a ring topology, the center is called a MAU. </li></ul><ul><li>The ring actually consists of a continuous circuit </li></ul><ul><li>Signals are passed along the circuit and accessed by stations in sequence </li></ul>
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×