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2011 2012 test security

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    2011 2012 test security 2011 2012 test security Presentation Transcript

    • KSDETest Security & Ethical Testing Practices 2011-2012 KSDE Fall Conference
    • Session Overview• “Housekeeping”• Scenario Central o Betty B. Good o Mr. Harold the “Newbie” o Mrs. Jamison o Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School o Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary School o Danny Frank o Paul, the New Test Coordinator• Resource List, Reminders, and Questions• Exit Slip• Read Aloud (bonus/extra)
    • Housekeeping Important Connections Cherie Randall crandall@ksde.org   Dave Bowman, KSDE dbowman@ksde.org  Mary Matthew, Olathe Public Schools and KAAC matthewm@olatheschools.org
    • Housekeeping Expectations• Adhere to our Quiet Signal• Stay on topic in discussion groups (if you can)• Speak one at a time and be respectful of others when they are speaking• Take care of your own personal needs (restroom, stretching, etc.)• Turn cell phones to “vibrate”• If there is a fire – get out!• Handout Packet and power point…will be posted on KSDE website.
    • Stand Up, Sit Down• Stand up if you are a test coordinator.• Sit down, if you are a veteran test coordinator.• Stand up if you are not a test coordinator.• Stand up if you work at the elementary level.• Stand up if you work at the middle level.• Stand up if you work at the high school level.• Stand up if you work for KSDE. Line Up…
    • Scenario Central• Betty B. Good• Mr. Harold the “Newbie”• Mrs. Jamison• Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School• Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary School• Danny Frank• Paul, the New Test CoordinatorPut a Star by positive things you see in the scenario!Place a question mark by practices you wonder about.Place a check mark by practices that you know are wrong!
    • Scenario: Betty B. Good• Betty B. Good makes sure that she has her students prepared for the state assessment tests that are administered in April. She is quite proud of the fact that 100% of her students score at the meets standard level or higher every year.• She has been able to make photocopies of most of the test’s questions over the past several years when she has had the opportunity to administer a read aloud accommodation and/or a paper and pencil accommodation in her classroom. She is then able to utilize these copies to prepare a month long test prep unit for her students where they are given actual test items and even some that she has adapted or changed slightly to solve. Betty is able to explain the problems when students miss them and she feels like this is an excellent way for her students to have the knowledge needed for the Kansas Summative Assessment.
    • Scenario: Betty B. Good • What do you think? • Is Betty in violation of any ethical practices or test security practices? • What should she do?Put a Star by positive things you see in the scenario!Place a question mark by practices you wonder about.Place a check mark by practices that you know are wrong!
    • Scenario: Betty B. Good• Betty B. Good makes sure that she has her students prepared for the state assessment tests that are administered in April. She is quite proud of the fact that 100% of her students score at the meets standard level or higher every year.• She has been able to make photocopies of most of the test’s questions over the past several years when she has had the opportunity to administer a read aloud accommodation and/or a paper and pencil accommodation in her classroom. She is then able to utilize these copies to prepare a month long test prep unit for her students where they are given actual test items and even some that she has adapted or changed slightly to solve. Betty is able to explain the problems when students miss them and she feels like this is an excellent way for her students to have the knowledge needed for the Kansas Summative Assessment.
    • Scenario: Betty B. GoodBetty is in violation of the following:Test Security:•Do not review tests or analyze test items before,during or after the assessment is administered.•Do not discuss any specific test items on the test withstudents before, during or after the administration ofthe assessment.•Do not reproduce or rewrite test materials.Unacceptable Test Preparation Practices•Do not use actual or altered test questions (clone,parallel) for practice or instruction.•Do not conduct comprehensive reviews or drills theday of the test or between testing sessions.
    • Scenario: Betty B. Good Betty needs to stop this practice! The district test coordinator should contact KSDE and report the violation to determine what the next step should be!
    • Scenario: Mr. Harold the “Newbie”• Mr. Harold is a new teacher at Happy Middle School. His fellow teachers have shared with him how important testing is at Happy Middle! He is a little nervous about making sure his students are prepared so he asked an old college friend that teaches the same grade/content in another district for any practice materials they have. He really wants to impress his fellow teachers by how well he has prepared his students. He immediately begins implementing the questions and passages that he received from his friend and is now confident that his students will be prepared.• Part 1: What do you think? Is this a good idea or not? Is Mr. Harold in violation of any ethical practices or test security practices?
    • Part 2 - Scenario: Mr. Harold the “Newbie”• During the first day of the KS assessment one of his students raises his hand and says, “Mr. H. we already read this story in class and answered these same questions or ones that were really close. Do we have to do this again?”
    • Part 2 - Scenario:Mr. Harold the “Newbie”• What do you think?• Is Mr. Harold in violation of any ethical practices or test security practices? What should Harold do?
    • Part 2 - Scenario: Mr. Harold the “Newbie”Harold is in violation of the following:Unacceptable Test Preparation Practices•Do not use actual or altered test questions (clone, parallel) forpractice or instruction.•Although Harold did not actually “create” the items he is a“victim” by using the items (which he thought was from a trustedsource) with his students.•Harold should contact his building/district testing coordinatorimmediately. AND…The District Testing Coordinator would needto contact KSDE, Cherie Randall.Dr. Cherie Randall, Assessment Coordinator,Kansas State Department of Education, 785.296.3996
    • Scenario: Mrs. Jamison•Because she is eager for her students to perform wellon their mathematics tests, Mrs. Jamison gives herstudents a graphic organizer to use during the year sothat when the time comes for the state math test theywill be prepared. Once students enter the computerlab to take the assessment she distributes theorganizer she created and the students begin the testby copying each problem onto the organizer andanswering each question. Upon completion of eachtest part, Mrs. Jamison collects the graphic organizerand scores each problem so that students havefeedback on how well they are doing.
    • Mrs. Jamison• What do you think?• Is Mrs. Jamison in violation of any ethical practices or test security practices? What should she do?
    • Scenario: Mrs. Jamison•Because she is eager for her students to perform wellon their mathematics tests, Mrs. Jamison gives herstudents a graphic organizer to use during the year sothat when the time comes for the state math test theywill be prepared. Once students enter the computerlab to take the assessment she distributes theorganizer she created and the students begin the testby copying each problem onto the organizer andanswering each question. Upon completion of eachtest part, Mrs. Jamison collects the graphic organizerand scores each problem so that students havefeedback on how well they are doing.
    • Scenario: Mrs. JamisonMrs. Jamison is in violation of the following:Test Security•Do not review tests or analyze test items before, during or afterthe assessment is administered.•Do not discuss any specific test items on the test with studentsbefore, during or after the administration of the assessment.•Do not construct answer keys so that an assessment may bescored locally.During Testing:•Actively monitor the testing session. Moving around the roomencourages students to focus on their own work.•Teachers may not require students to show work or use scratchpaper. Scratch paper may not be graded.•Students may use blank paper to show and check their work.This work must be collected and destroyed upon completion ofthe entire test.•Teachers may not require students to use manipulatives, graphicorganizers, or other tools during the assessment.
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School: Lab 1•Kansas Sunflower High School is having a monitor visit. The monitorteam has already checked in at the district level and foundeverything to be in compliance. Next stop, Sunflower High School!Upon arriving at the school, they are greeted by the buildingprincipal and the building assessment coordinator. After reviewingthe documentation provided at the school level including theEvidence of Standards based Goals for students taking a KAMM(IEP’s) they are ready to visit testing rooms.Lab 1:•Upon entering the first computer lab they overhear the teacher/testproctor say to a student, “Well, if you think back to what we learnedin class about finding the main idea I’m sure you will find theanswer.”•What do you think? Is the test proctor in violation of any ethicalpractices or test security practices? What should they do?
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School Lab 1Lab 1 Violation:•Do not respond to questions during testing that would helpthe students to understand the question, aid them inresponding to an item, or advise/encourage them to editor change a response.•Readers may not clarify, elaborate, or provide assistanceto students in any way. When reading test items aloud,readers must be careful not to give clues that indicate thecorrect answer or help eliminate some answer choices.The reader must avoid cueing the student by using voiceinflection or by providing information that is not in the test.What should they do?•Say to students, I’m sorry I can’t help you, just do your best.
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School: Lab 2•Upon entering the next computer lab they overhearthe teacher/test proctor say to a student, “Would itmake the question easier, if I told you that you justneed to find the main idea? I know that question is alittle wordy. I think if you eliminate the ones right awaythat you don’t know it will be easy to spot the rightanswer because a couple of those choices aren’teven plausible.”•What do you think? Is the test proctor in violation ofany ethical practices or test security practices? Whatshould they do?
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School Lab 2Violation:•Do not coach or cue students in any way during testadministration. This includes gestures and facial expressions.•Do not respond to questions during testing that would help thestudents to understand the question, aid them in responding toan item, or advise/encourage them to edit or change aresponse.•Readers may not clarify, elaborate, or provide assistance tostudents in any way. When reading test items aloud, readersmust be careful not to give clues that indicate the correctanswer or help eliminate some answer choices. The reader mustavoid cueing the student by using voice inflection or byproviding information that is not in the test.•What should they do?•Say to students, I’m sorry I can’t help you, just do your best.
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School: Lab 3•Upon entering the third computer lab they overhearthe teacher/test proctor say to a student, “Thank youfor showing me the End Review Screen, you haveanswered all of the questions and may exit the test.”A second teacher is present in the room and isactively monitoring the test session by moving aroundthe room.•What do you think? Is the test proctor in violation ofany ethical practices or test security practices? Whatshould they do?
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Sunflower High School Lab 3No violation:•After Testing•The teacher may verify the End Review Screen (KCA)to see that all test questions have been answeredbefore a student exits the test.•Collect and destroy (shred) student notes, scratchpaper, and drawings, etc. upon completion of eachtest part.•Having two adults in the room is a great way toprevent test security violations!
    • Monitor Visits• Schools/Districts can • About 5% of KS schools volunteer to receive a will have a monitor visit! monitor visit Just because you volunteer doesn’t• OR Schools/Districts mean you will have a can be randomly visit! selected – visits would be considered – How to Volunteer: “unannounced” •Complete the Exit Slip provided today to indicate you would like to volunteer your school/district •OR - Contact Cherie Randall at KSDE (by email)
    • Monitor Visits• Success comes with being prepared!• Monitor Checklist – page 9-10
    • Monitor Visits What did we learn from our 2010-2011 visits?• Great things are Opportunities for Improvement happening in Kansas! •Very few “incidents” or issues were reported• 81 schools/districts •Of those… participated in o Responding to student successful monitor visits questions during the• 100% of the assessment o Small group size – more schools/districts were than 3 (no appropriate) able to verify & show o Reading Directions from the required elements Manual o Materials posted on walls
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary School•Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary School is having a monitorvisit. The monitor team has already checked in at thedistrict level and found everything to be in compliance.Next stop, the school building!•Upon arriving at the school, they are greeted by thebuilding principal who has all of the trainingdocumentation for test security and the read aloudaccommodation training in a three ring notebook alongwith the teacher sign-off forms to verify they have beentrained. Things look to be in good shape!•The monitor team is ready to visit testing rooms.
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary SchoolLab 1:•Upon entering the first computer lab they hear the test proctorassigning each student to a computer so that students are notsitting side by side with the same test form number. Once thistask is completed, the test proctor begins to read the directionsfrom the Examiner’s Manual and students begin testing.•On the front table a variety of math manipulatives are ondisplay for students to use if they so choose. The monitor teamnotices that measuring cups and spoons with more than onefraction marked on them are part of the manipulatives providedalong with a metric conversion chart. The team also notes thatthe walls are covered with information on the metric system andother math helpful hints and tips for solving problems!•What do you think? Is this a violation of any ethical practices ortest security practices? What should they do?
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary SchoolLab 1:•Upon entering the first computer lab they hear thetest proctor assigning each student to a computer sothat students are not sitting side by side with the sametest form number. Once this task is completed, thetest proctor begins to read the directions from theExaminer’s Manual and students begin testing. ese are Good things… All of th
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary SchoolLab 1: Violation:•In the Examiner’s Manual a complete list of appropriate mathmanipulatives is available. In this example, measuring cups andspoons with more than one fraction marked on them are not onthe approved list, neither is a metric conversion chart.•It also states on the KSDE Testing Fact Sheet and the Examiner’sManual that you are to:•Remove or cover (with opaque material) bulletin board displays,charts and diagrams, and other instructional material which maygive assistance or advantage during testing.•What should they do?•Remove the items from the table and take down the displays.
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary SchoolLab 2:•Upon entering the second room the monitor team isable to see a small group read aloudaccommodation being administered. The reader hasmade sure that the three students are far enoughapart so that they can’t see each other’s answers andis standing behind the students reading the questionsout loud.•What do you think? Is this a violation of any ethicalpractices or test security practices? What should theydo?
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary SchoolLab 2: No violation…•A small group read aloud should have no more than3 students in the group. Students should be separatedso that they cannot see each other’s answers. Havingthe reader stand behind or beside students whenreading is recommended.
    • Scenario: Monitor Visit to Kansas Flint Hilly Elementary SchoolLab 2: No violation…•Readers may not clarify, elaborate, or provideassistance to students in any way. When reading testitems aloud, readers must be careful not to give cluesthat indicate the correct answer or help eliminatesome answer choices. The reader must avoid cueingthe student by using voice inflection or by providinginformation that is not in the test.•Nothing may be read from the reading passage!
    • Read Aloud Reminders• Absolutely nothing from a reading passage may be read or pronounced, including single words.• It is important that the reader wait until all the students in the small group are ready before reading the next item.• Positioning is another important consideration. The reader should stand to the side or behind the student to avoid facial expressions, eye contact, and body language that might inadvertently cue the student.• Reminder…read aloud – yearly training! (end of this ppt. you can find options for this training but the KSDE website has additional resources)
    • Scenario: Danny Frank• Danny Frank has taught for 15 years and given the state assessment for the last 6 years. He has been the building test coordinator for the past 3 years. One of his duties is to make sure that test materials are kept in a secure, locked location before testing, between test sessions and upon completion of testing.• Danny decided to distribute everything to the teachers and ask them to find a place in their classroom to keep them safe. He placed the Examiner’s Manuals, the tickets, and the read aloud scripts in all of the teacher’s mailboxes on a Friday afternoon before the school dance with a note that said, “Please keep these secure.”• Near the end of the testing window Danny placed a huge box outside his classroom labeled, “Recycle your Test Materials Here!” He sent a note to the rest of teachers letting them know where the box would be located!
    • Scenario: Danny Frank•What do you think? Is Danny Frank inviolation of any ethical practices or testsecurity practices? What should he do?
    • Scenario: Danny Frank• Danny Frank has taught for 15 years and given the state assessment for the last 6 years. He has been the building test coordinator for the past 3 years. One of his duties is to make sure that test materials are kept in a secure, locked location before testing, between test sessions and upon completion of testing.• Danny decided to distribute everything to the teachers and ask them to find a place in their classroom to keep them safe. He placed the Examiner’s Manuals, the tickets, and the read aloud scripts in all of the teacher’s mailboxes on a Friday afternoon before the school dance with a note that said, “Please keep these secure.”• Near the end of the testing window Danny placed a huge box outside his classroom labeled, “Recycle your Test Materials Here!” He sent a note to the rest of teachers letting them know where the box would be located!• What do you think? Is Danny Frank in violation of any ethical practices or test security practices? What should he do?
    • Scenario: Danny FrankBuilding level person’s responsibilities:•The building test coordinator is responsible for test security atthe building level and must follow procedures outlined byDistrict Test Coordinator.•Store test materials (booklets, tickets) in a secure, lockedarea before and between each session(s) and after testing.•Count test materials (read aloud scripts, paper pencilaccommodation, Braille, etc.) upon arrival, between eachsession, and after testing;•Distribute test materials to teachers immediately before thetesting session (*see Read Aloud Accommodation) andcollect upon completion of the testing session;•Instruct teachers not to open test booklets prior toadministration (*see Read Aloud Accommodation);
    • Scenario: Danny FrankDanny is in violation of the following:•Danny did not keep materials in a secure lockedlocation – before, between and after testing.•His recycle bin (although good for the environment)would not be a secure way to collect materials uponcompletion of the assessments.•Danny needs to find a different way to distribute andcollect testing materials so that they remain secure!Each district testing coordinator is responsible forestablishing guidelines/expectations for building testcoordinators to follow.
    • Sample Task List• Packet – page 14• District and Building Assessment Coordinators – p. 8 of the Fact Sheet
    • Scenario: Paul, the New Test Coordinator•Paul is a new test coordinator for his school district. Hefeels proud of the fact that he is responsible for test securityat the district level and takes his new job seriously. Afterattending the state conference session on Test Security forNew Test Coordinators he actively begins to plan out hisnext steps for implementation. In his notes he wrote, “beprepared to show them our ethics sign-off sheets” but hecan’t remember where to find this or what to do.•What should Paul do?
    • Scenario: Paul, the New Test Coordinator•What should Paul do?•Paul could search the KSDE website for examples,LOOK in the KS Examiner’s Manual for a sample and/or contact any member of the Kansas AssessmentAdvisory Council.•The Kansas Assessment Advisory Council is arepresentative group of test coordinators from acrossthe state.
    • KAAC 2011-2012 Kansas Assessment Advisory Council MembersDr. George Abel, Assistant Superintendent - Teaching & Learning (Emporia)Sue Amos, Testing and Assessment Coordinator (Gardner-Edgerton)Braden Anshutz, Elementary and Junior High Principal (Mission Valley)Dr. Mike Aytes, Director of Teaching and Learning (Manhattan)Stephanie Bird, Multilingual Education Services, Teaching Specialist (Wichita)David Bowman, Assessment Education Program Consultant KSDEVicki Chance, Jr/Sr. High Counselor and Test Coordinator (Rawlins County)Ann Connor, Associate Superintendent (Archdiocese of KC) MembershipStephen Court, Consultant with KSDELee Cox, Assistant Director (SCKSEC)Randy Doerksen, Prosperity Elementary Principal (Buhler)Jackie Farha, Supervisor for Title I Improvement (Wichita) list can beBeth Fultz, NAEP Coordinator KSDEDan Gruman, Director of Assessment and Research (Shawnee Mission)Joyce Harting, Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (Mulvane)Dr. Jim Heiman, Consultant for KSDE found withRuth Heinrichs, Director of Curriculum & Instruction (Great Bend)Dr. Neal Kingston, CETE Director (Kansas University)Dr. Andy Koenigs, Associate Superintendent (Andover)Teresa Kraft, Curriculum Assessment Coordinator (KS School for the Deaf) yourDr. Laura Kramer, CETE Assistant Director (Kansas University)Dr. Jackie Lakin, Information Management Program Consultant KSDEGabriele Leite, Assessment & Evaluation (Salina)Bill Losey, Data Analyst Management Consultant SWPRSC ScenarioMary Matthew, Director of Assessment & School Improvement (Olathe)Deborah Matthews, Special Education Program Consultant KSDEMatt Meek, Asst. Superintendent of Curriculum/Instruction/Assessment (Paola)Gary Nelson, Superintendent (Lincoln)Janet Neufeld, Asst. Superintendent of Instruction & Professional Development (Newton) Answers!Steve Nordby, Assessment Coordinator (Garden City)Julie Parker, Curriculum/Test Coordinator (Beloit)Elizabeth Parks, Director of Assessment & Research (Blue Valley)Dr. Cherie Randall, Assessment CoordinatorKSDEDr. Will Roth, Superintendent (Hays)Dr. Teresa San Martin, Assistant Superintendent for Academic Affairs (Goddard)Kris Shaw, Standards & Assessment Services Reading Program Consultant KSDE Please stand!Dr. Scott Smith, Standards & Assessment Services Assistant Director KSDEJill Stout, Director of Data and Testing (Liberal)Bonnie Williams, Director of Curriculum & Instruction (Royal Valley)Bob Winkler, Director of Research and Assessments (Topeka)Ray Wipf, Executive Director of Management Information Services (Dodge City)Dr. Dan Wright, Director Dept. of Educational Research & Assessment (Kansas City)
    • Additional Resources• KSDE Website• Kansas Assessment Fact Sheet: Appropriate Testing Practices• Kansas Examiner’s Manual• KSDE Read Aloud Information• Handout Packet, Answer Key and Power Point…will be posted on KSDE website.
    • Session Exit Slip• Counts has your “attendance/requirement” to attend yearly training on Test Security and Ethics• Provides a method to collect information about volunteering for a Monitor Visit!• Shares Questions and Feedback…• Scenario Answer Key – Please pick us as you drop off your Exit Slip!
    • KSDE Live Meetings Additional Options• Test Security Refresher Training for Veteran Test Coordinators:  o November 7th 11:30-12:30 o November 14th 3:30 -4:30 (tentative)• Test Security 101 for NEW Test Coordinators: o November 11th 11:30-12:30 o November 16th 3:30-4:30 (tentative)
    • Cherie Randall crandall@ksde.org Dave Bowman, KSDE dbowman@ksde.orgMary Matthew, Olathe Public Schools and KAACmatthewm@olatheschools.org
    • Read Aloud• Readers administering the read-aloud accommodation must have annual staff development on reading an assessment to a student.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesStudent Need•A student who needs a read-aloud accommodation isone whose ability to convey knowledge of the subject /content area is severely limited by his/her inability to readthe assessment materials. The student cannot or would notbe successful in the classroom without the read aloudaccommodation. The read-aloud accommodation is for astudent who needs the entire assessment (except thereading passage) read to him. The read-aloudaccommodation does not refer to an adult reading anoccasional word, an occasional distracter, an occasionalstem, or an occasional question to the student.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesStudent Need2.In order to use the read-aloud accommodation onthe state assessment, the student must have the read-aloud accommodation provided in the classroom ona regular basis (i.e., as an on-going practice for bothclassroom instruction and classroom assessments/tests. o Just because a student is an ELL student does not mean they can automatically receive this accommodation. o Just because the student is a SPED student does not mean they can automatically receive this accommodation. o Just because the student is a Title 1 student does not mean they can automatically receive this accommodation. o Just because a General Education student has a student improvement plan does not mean they can automatically receive this accommodation.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesStudent NeedNote: It is the local district’s responsibility to define“severely” in item #1 above and to quantify on a“regular” basis for classroom instruction andassessments/tests in item #2 above.Tools for determining need and resources availableare known only to individual districts. However, thegeneral expectation is that students will be more than1 year below grade in reading and that theaccommodation is being systematically applied atleast 50% of the time on classroom assignments and100% of the time on classroom assessmentscontributing to classroom grades.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesStudent Need3. A student’s need for the read-aloudaccommodation must be documented on one of thefollowing plans:•Pre-intervention plan (student improvement plan)•ELL plan•504 plan•IEP
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesStudent Need4. The following information must be included on a studentimprovement plan, ELL plan, or IEP that serves the purpose ofdocumenting student need for a read-aloud accommodation.•Student name•Student grade•Building/district•Evidence documenting need for the read-aloudaccommodation, including, but not necessarily limited to o Reading test scores o Progress monitoring data o Reading level of instructional materials used in classroom o Documentation that the read-aloud accommodation is used in the classroom setting for both instructional materials and assessments/tests and the date that this accommodation was implemented o For plans other than IEPs, signatures of team members involved in the decision to recommend the read-aloud accommodation, including at least the student’s teacher and building administrator. o IEPs must have all documentation required for providing any accommodations to students with an Individual Education Plan.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesDocumentation•A copy of the student’s plan (Individual StudentImprovement Plan) or a summary sheet must be kepton file with the District Test Coordinator.•KSDE will be monitoring 5-10% of assessmentadministrations this year and may ask to seedocumentation for the need of paper/pencil andread-aloud accommodations.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-Aloud for Groups of Students•Best practice is to provide the read-aloudaccommodation to individual students. However, it isallowable to provide the read-aloud accommodationto small groups of two or three students.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-Aloud for Groups of Students•Best practice is to provide the read-aloudaccommodation (individual or small group) inconjunction with Accommodation a separate quiet orindividual setting.•It is not appropriate to provide the read-aloudaccommodation in proximities that would distractthose receiving the accommodation or thoseengaged in other activities including stateassessments. The intent of read-aloud via a humanreader is to deliver the read-aloud in a normalconversational voice.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-Aloud for Groups of Students•A group is defined as two or three studentswho receive exactly the same read-aloudaccommodation at the same time. Thestudents will all have the same form, and thereading will be directed to all of these studentsat the same time and in the same place usingKSDE prepared scripts.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-Aloud for Groups of Students•Best practice is for Groups of two or three students toreceive the read-aloud accommodation inconjunction with the paper / pencil accommodation.However, it is allowable for a read-aloud to occur withsmall groups of student arranged in a small cluster of 2to 3 computers in a separate quiet setting and torespond to the script directly on the computer.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-Aloud for Groups of Students•A group is NOT a number of students in a particularroom who are taking different forms of the assessmentand who are raising their hands at various times tohave a word or a distracter pronounced or an itemstem read.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesThe Reading Assessment•Absolutely nothing from a reading passage may beread or pronounced, including single words. Ifreading passages to a student on the state readingassessment is allowed on the student’s plan, thestudent will then be counted as not participating.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesAllowable Practices•Practices such as pronouncing an occasional word,an occasional distracter, an occasional stem, or anoccasional question should be consideredacceptable assessment, practice requiring no specialdocumentation and no special coding of the answersheet. The teacher should use professional discretionregarding the number of times a student may requestassistance. Again, absolutely nothing from a readingpassage may be read or pronounced.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and Guidelines• There are two options for students who need to have extensive portions of the tests read to them: the read-aloud accommodation using readers or using the KCA audio voice software.• Scripts will be available in spring, 2012. No scripts will be available for Fall OTL testing. o Accessibility to (pdf) copies of the test for the paper/pencil accommodation and to read-aloud scripts must be determined by the district office.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-aloud Accommodation and Scripts•For the Reading Assessment, the reading passagemay not be read to the students. Only the questionstems and answer choices may be read aloud.•Scripts for the general assessment as well as for theKAMM have been prepared for readers to follow forthe mathematics, reading, and science assessments.They include all text and labels that may be readaloud.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-aloud Accommodation and Scripts•The scripts must be used for the read-aloudaccommodation.•Scripts are not to be distributed to readers more than 24hours prior to the assessments.•The reader may read the test to ensure that they are ableto pronounce all words.•The reader must return the script to the testing coordinatoror building principal once they have read the script forpurposes of becoming familiar with the material that will beread.•The read-aloud scripts should never be taken out of thebuilding.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-aloud Accommodation and Scripts•Store test materials (copies of the assessments, scripts,and tickets) in a secure, locked area (before, betweenand after testing).•Distribute test materials immediately before thetesting session. Collect test materials immediatelyfollowing the testing session.•Numbering scripts/test (recommended) – is an easyway to keep track that you have all of the materialsreturned.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and GuidelinesRead-aloud Accommodation and Scripts•If the established read-aloud practice/strategy onclassroom assignments and assessments is for thereader to read the item stems and responses first, thenthe student reads the passage, followed by thereader re-reading the item stems and responses; thenit is acceptable to do so, on the read-aloud stateassessment. This is the only time it is acceptable tovary from the script.
    • Read-Aloud Accommodation Policy and Guidelines• The following management tasks are required: o Download the pdf file from the CETE website. (district level) o Make paper copies of read-aloud script for building(s) by printing the pdf file. o Delete from any computer the pdf file used to create the paper copies. o Maintain security of the read-aloud scripts by not delivering the copies to the readers more than 24 hours before the tests are to be administered. The scripts may not be copied nor taken out of the building. o Deliver the read-aloud scripts to appropriate people (either to building test coordinators if the manager is the district test coordinator or to the readers if the manager is the building test coordinator). o Shred all paper copies of the read-aloud scripts after they have been used. No copies may be retained at either the building or the district level. o Maintain documentation of test security.
    • Important Administration Guidance•It is important that students who receive the read-aloudaccommodation on Kansas State Assessments receive thesame accommodation for instruction and classroomassessment throughout the school year.•Students need to have the opportunity to practicelistening carefully to an adult reader while following alongin text.•Students should have the opportunity to experience anelectronic voice in the same manner, and to the extentpossible hear the CETE electronic voice prior to theassessment. Since there is an additional memory load for astudent using the read-aloud accommodation, he/sheneeds to practice to be able to use the accommodationeffectively.• 
    • Important Administration Guidance• When providing the read-aloud accommodation, readers may not clarify, elaborate, or provide assistance to students in any way. When reading the script, readers must be careful not to give clues that indicate the correct answer or help eliminate some answer choices. The reader can inadvertently cue the student using voice inflection, or by providing information that is not in the text.• Positioning is another important consideration. The reader should stand to the side or behind the student to avoid facial expressions, eye contact, and body language that might inadvertently cue the student.
    • Important Administration Guidance• When a student is provided the read-aloud accommodation on an individual basis, the reader should adapt the pace (i.e., knowing when the student is ready to have the next item read) to the needs of the individual student. If the read-aloud accommodation is being provided to a small group of two or three students, pacing becomes problematic. It is important that the reader wait until all the students in the small group are ready before reading the next item. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text, no matter which setting is used to provide the read-aloud accommodation. If one student needs pacing that differs widely from the other students in the small group, then that student should receive the read- aloud accommodation individually.
    • Important Administration Guidance• The potential for a student copying another student’s answers or being influenced by another student’s behavior may be a problem when the read-aloud accommodation is provided in a small group. The adult reader must carefully consider how students will be seated, or whether carrels or dividers need to be used with a particular group of students. If one student marks an answer immediately after hearing an answer choice and this action influences another student to do the same thing, the reader might consider asking students to listen to the entire item before marking their answers. It is the responsibility of the reader to make sure that any student receiving the read-aloud accommodation in a small group is not being influenced by another student.
    • Important Administration Guidance• Readers will not be given more than 24 hour access to review read-aloud scripts. Read-Aloud scripts are never to leave the building. It is important that the readers review scripts before the administration of the assessment. The readers need to review the entire script to make sure they know how to pronounce all of the words, abbreviations, and symbols contained in the assessment. If a reader does not know the correct pronunciation of a word, he/she should check a dictionary or ask a content area teacher in the building or district for assistance. Only individual words, and not whole items, should be shown to content area teachers when asking for assistance.• The local district test coordinator will be responsible for maintaining test security during the review period.
    • Important Administration GuidanceReader Criteria•Best practice is for the regular classroom teacher to be thedesignated “Reader” of the read-aloud assessment. Whenthat is not possible then a licensed teacher employed bythe school district is the next best choice. However, weknow in certain circumstance this is not always possible.KSDE strongly recommends that if “readers” other thanlicensed teachers must be used, that the reader be atrained employee of the school district. KSDE does notallow student readers (i.e., students in the school systemreading to other students) and parent volunteers.