‘ Stories of Change’? Introducing MSC -  First workshop August 2008 Monitoring Impact www.mande.co.uk Adapting MSC devised...
Time Plan <ul><li>Introducing MSC Most Significant Change </li></ul><ul><li>Share our own Stories of Change </li></ul><ul>...
What are Stories of Change (or Most Significant Change)? <ul><li>Use ‘news stories’ to measure significant change </li></u...
A Simple Application of MSC <ul><li>Think for a few minutes of the MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGE that you experienced during you...
HOW TO COLLECT STORIES OF CHANGE  <ul><li>Who should be involved?  </li></ul><ul><li>Ideally everyone can be involved in t...
Five key questions (or Change Questions) to ask about change?   <ul><li>What change has there been in people’s lives since...
‘ Patchwork’ of stories <ul><li>A collection of stories from a variety of people with different roles, interests and backg...
Village – or Base Community In response to ‘the question’ each individual shares their story of change Group discuss each ...
From village to district to national level  Local Level Local Level Local Level DistrictLevel Discuss and agree one Most S...
How should we ask it? <ul><li>The aim of this exercise is not to collect hundreds of stories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>remembe...
Depending on Numbers now divide in 4 groups (15 mins only) ‏ <ul><li>10 is a good number for a group </li></ul><ul><li>Agr...
Most significant change <ul><li>Once you have identified who will be asked to provide stories it is best to ask them a sim...
Learning <ul><li>The answers to questions will be subjective but through group discussion become 'verified'  </li></ul><ul...
An On-going Review Tool <ul><li>By using a periodic ‘Review Meeting’ you can collectively decide which changes are the mos...
How often should we collect stories or repeat this process? <ul><li>This process can be adapted to your own needs.  </li><...
The findings from your review meetings can be: <ul><ul><li>Fed into monitoring or review reports. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Ethics to consider <ul><li>These considerations are taken to include, at a minimum: </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty to staff and...
A report explains the whole process of story gathering: <ul><li>Who was involved, how were they selected and why? </li></u...
END Do seek more advice on how to use and adapt this process by visiting www.mande.co.uk Thank You
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Msc Wkshop Cafod 2008

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Msc Wkshop Cafod 2008

  1. 1. ‘ Stories of Change’? Introducing MSC - First workshop August 2008 Monitoring Impact www.mande.co.uk Adapting MSC devised by Rick Davies
  2. 2. Time Plan <ul><li>Introducing MSC Most Significant Change </li></ul><ul><li>Share our own Stories of Change </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion on strengths weaknesses of MSC </li></ul><ul><li>Finish 1.55 sharp </li></ul>
  3. 3. What are Stories of Change (or Most Significant Change)? <ul><li>Use ‘news stories’ to measure significant change </li></ul><ul><li>In the human narrative tradition – Bible, Koran, Torah, Mahavimsa </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how things change, what change takes place, how it affects us and our communities </li></ul><ul><li>Assembles stories into a longer narrative of ‘our journey’ </li></ul>
  4. 4. A Simple Application of MSC <ul><li>Think for a few minutes of the MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGE that you experienced during your work in August 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Write this down on a piece of paper and say why it is most significant to you. We'll share these later. </li></ul>
  5. 5. HOW TO COLLECT STORIES OF CHANGE <ul><li>Who should be involved? </li></ul><ul><li>Ideally everyone can be involved in this monitoring process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>beneficiaries, participants, partner field staff and managers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You need to be clear what type of information you want to collect before you can decide who will be involved in the process. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ domains of change’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Design a question which will be most useful in understanding the progress and impact of the work at this point in time… </li></ul>
  6. 6. Five key questions (or Change Questions) to ask about change? <ul><li>What change has there been in people’s lives since our last meeting? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defines a reporting period </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Has there been any change in people’s participation or behaviour? </li></ul><ul><li>Have there been any changes in the quality or nature of partnerships? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Families, neighbours, villages, government servants, other CBOs or NGOs? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Have there been any changes in policy and practice? </li></ul><ul><li>Has there been any other significant change? </li></ul>
  7. 7. ‘ Patchwork’ of stories <ul><li>A collection of stories from a variety of people with different roles, interests and backgrounds will help to provide a bigger, more holistic picture of the impact - a ‘patchwork’ of stories. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to consider gender, age, ethnicity, … in the selection of your participants. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember Change is not always good – what about negative stories? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Village – or Base Community In response to ‘the question’ each individual shares their story of change Group discuss each story then select one ‘Most Significant Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Most Significant Story
  9. 9. From village to district to national level Local Level Local Level Local Level DistrictLevel Discuss and agree one Most Significant Story
  10. 10. How should we ask it? <ul><li>The aim of this exercise is not to collect hundreds of stories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>remember the information collated needs to be useful and informative. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It is important that you collect some stories about what the situation is like at the start of the work. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>base line data vital in comparisons 'measuring' what has changed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep the Five Change Questions in mind will help you to focus the information you collect </li></ul><ul><ul><li>preferable to ask only one question at a time. Over time, you can collect information in answer to all or most of the Five Change Questions. </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Depending on Numbers now divide in 4 groups (15 mins only) ‏ <ul><li>10 is a good number for a group </li></ul><ul><li>Agree on a rapporteur (I think some people may have been primed)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Limited time - please only 5 people in each group briefly share your MSC – give each STORY a number </li></ul><ul><li>Vote (a quick way of surfacing the MSC) write on a piece of paper the story of change you think is most significant (don't vote for your own) and say WHY </li></ul>
  12. 12. Most significant change <ul><li>Once you have identified who will be asked to provide stories it is best to ask them a simple question…… </li></ul><ul><li>“ During the last month*, in your opinion, what do you think was the most significant change that took place in the lives of people participating in the Nigeria PHC programme?” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Information about who collected the story and when the event occurred </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Description of the story itself – what happened </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Significance (to the story teller) of events described in the story </li></ul></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Learning <ul><li>The answers to questions will be subjective but through group discussion become 'verified' </li></ul><ul><li>It will help you to begin to answer or understand “Is this work having the desired/anticipated impact?” </li></ul><ul><li>If the reported change is negative this can be important in ensuring the programme avoids repetition and further damage. Will help define how the programme might avoid such negative impacts in future </li></ul><ul><li>If it is positive then it will be important in the planning and development of the work in the future </li></ul>
  14. 14. An On-going Review Tool <ul><li>By using a periodic ‘Review Meeting’ you can collectively decide which changes are the most significant and what can be learnt from them. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify who will form the review group. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide the Change Question/s and stories to all group members. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure a ‘safe’ environment where people can talk freely. </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate carefully – ensuring space for ‘weaker voices’ </li></ul><ul><li>Allow time for reflection and debate </li></ul><ul><li>Document, Evaluate – what have we learnt? </li></ul><ul><li>Decide on follow up </li></ul>
  15. 15. How often should we collect stories or repeat this process? <ul><li>This process can be adapted to your own needs. </li></ul><ul><li>repeat the process anything from monthly to annually. </li></ul><ul><li>Ideally ensure regular intervals between the collections of stories and be realistic about the time involved. </li></ul><ul><li>Allocating sufficient time will ensure a more valuable collection of stories, debate, reflection and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce MSC into staff work plans, monthly reporting so a continuous impact monitoring process becomes part of the staff learning. </li></ul>
  16. 16. The findings from your review meetings can be: <ul><ul><li>Fed into monitoring or review reports. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared with participants/partners/ beneficiaries/field staff in order to plan and develop the future of the programme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Used in discussions with partners around the development and quality of the partnership you are involved in. </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Ethics to consider <ul><li>These considerations are taken to include, at a minimum: </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty to staff and subjects about the purpose, methods and intended and possible uses of the information gathered and process; </li></ul><ul><li>Confidentiality of information supplied by and the anonymity of respondents as far as possible or where appropriate. </li></ul>
  18. 18. A report explains the whole process of story gathering: <ul><li>Who was involved, how were they selected and why? </li></ul><ul><li>An idea of the range of stories contributed and the nature of the discussions held to determine which is MOST SIGNIFICANT. </li></ul><ul><li>The full original narrative of the Most Significant Storey chosen and WHY. </li></ul><ul><li>What effect has the whole process had in understanding the impact of your work. </li></ul><ul><li>Have there been any unexpected learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Make recommendations that will have implications on future programme directions, or activities? </li></ul>
  19. 19. END Do seek more advice on how to use and adapt this process by visiting www.mande.co.uk Thank You

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