Future of Academic Libraries
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Future of Academic Libraries

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Future of Academic Libraries Presentation Transcript

  • 1. IMPACT OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGYInternet Search unlocks Value• Profound changes in behavior • Better matching between in just 20 yrs. customers/organizations• Internet business valued @ $780B worldwide • Time saved• Search value: Time • Raised awareness saved, price transparency, raised • People matching … Problem awareness solving• 1 trillion+ unique URLs indexed • New business models by Google in 2010 • Completely different• People signal their habits online; harnessed by others entertainment modes • Long-tail offerings (niche items discovery by buyers)(Source: “Impact of Internet technologies: Search”, McKinsey &Company, July 2011)
  • 2. FUTURE OF SEARCH• Search technology will • Advent of need to develop to keep smartphones, tablets, w pace with online eb connected portable content devices leading to more• Continue to make search personalized searches quick, results relevant • Search technology will• Use of vertical search be turbulent, leading to engines rising (10x’s as disruptive many product searches change, complex now executed on security issues Amazon, eBay) • Researchers (librarians) continue to make sense of it all. (Source: McKinsey … Search Report, 2011)
  • 3. 5 MYTHS ABOUT THE ‘INFORMATION AGE’1. The book is dead – NOT! More books are actually produced in print each year than the previous • Super Thursday, Britain, 2010 – 800 new works printed in single day • 288,355 books printed in U.S. in 2009, even more in 2010, 2011 • Non-traditional books – nearly 765,000 titles produced by self- publishing authors and ‘micro-niche’ print-on-demand enterprises • Book business just beginning in developing countries: China, Brazil • Population of books INCREASING, not decreasing.2. We have just entered the ‘Information Age’ – Every age has their ‘age of information’. We are not in an unprecedented age, just an age of changing media.
  • 4. MORE MYTHS …3. All information is available online – Only a tiny fraction of archival material has ever been read, much less digitized… judicial decisions/legislation (state and federal) NOT on the Web … regulations/reports, public and private NOT on the Web … just 12% of the 129,864,880 different books in the world have been digitized.4. Libraries are obsolete – Librarians all over the country report they’ve never had SO MANY patrons … libraries supply: Books, videos, magazines, other material and now NEW functions: Helping small businesses with access to info, employment information for job seekers, helping patrons discover & use digitalized collections.5. The future is digital –True. Not the entire picture – the prevalence of electronic information doesn’t spell the end of print materials, but instead enhances and enriches the environment (TV did not die when the Internet came onboard; radio is still in existence, now enhanced by satellite).
  • 5. REFLECTIONS ON A DIGITAL AGE• Now living in a crucial phase of transition to dominantly digital ecology -- a shifting information environment to be sure, but one where old books and e-books are ‘allies’, not enemies• As books are increasingly ‘born digital’, e-book sales continue to rise Last year sales of e-books comprised 10% of all book sales, expected to rise to 15-20% this year … Print book sales are also rising as enthusiasm for e-books stimulates reading in general … rise of book ‘machines’ – to meet on-demand printing of books. (Espresso Book Machine 2.0)(Source: 5 Myths about the Information Age, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Darnton, Robert, April 17, 2011)
  • 6. GOOGLE (2009 ASSETS: $21B)• E-books have had “very disruptive impact on the entire publication/reading ecosystem .. multiple access devices, platforms …• … The e-book industry has turned an important corner in reinventing book publishing for 21st century”…”• Google Books: Lost April, 2011 anti-trust case; Court ruled against scanning, providing ‘snippets’ of ‘orphan works’ on Google.com• Google e-Bookstore: Opened December, 2010 … “a Gutenberg moment for the publishing industry” …(Source: “eBooks Everywhere: the Digital Transformation of Reading”, Nancy Herther, Searcher Magazine, July/August 2011 … “An Introduction to Competition Concerns in the Google Books Settlement”,New York Law School Report #23, 09/10)
  • 7. E-BOOKS
  • 8. REFLECTIONS ON A DIGITAL AGE• A decline in deep, reflective, cover-to-cover reading?• The Internet supports self-publishing and e-books – is that all bad?• New opportunities for self-publishing: e-books, tweets and blogs on the Internet• What about Google Books• What other opportunities do YOU see in this new digital age?
  • 9. LIBRARY @ SPEED OF LIGHT• migration from print to electronic – Library’s dual nature not only as storage for materials, but gathering place & information center• imbedded into campus community – Librarians increasingly away from the reference desk, onto campus; interdisciplinary collaboration with faculty and students across the curriculum• library as ‘place’ movement – For help, support, guidance locating & using digital and other resources• environmental analysis – Constant, conducted by librarians to determine nature of on-going user needs.(Source: Reference Reborn: Breathing new life into public service librarianship, Ed., Zabel, D., Libraries Unlimited, 2010)
  • 10. ACADEMIC LIBRARY TRENDS• Collection growth driven by patron demand, new resource types: Just- in-time … print-on-demand for books .. 24-hr. turnaround for article requests … access to full-text sources, not just discovery … e-books availability … PLs (Personal Librarians) @ Drexel, Barnard• Budget challenges: Stagnant/reduced operating and materials budgets … affects ability to attract/retain staff, build collections, provide access to resources/services, develop innovative services … books moving off- site for retrieval as-needed• Librarians to possess diverse skill sets: On-going training …use of non- MLS professionals working in changing environment ... Retirees = leadership gap, loss of institutional memory• Increasing demands for library accountability and educational assessment• Social Networking … Open Source Publishing
  • 11. AUTOMATED BOOK RETRIEVAL- UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, MANSUETO LIBRARY
  • 12. REAL LIBRARY, REAL USERS = SOCIAL NETWORKS• 500 million FB users : 51% log in EVERY DAY• Libraries & Facebook: For reference services? Market to different levels of followers?• FB status updates = Stories (Followers + Sharing)• Library FB page = CALL to ACTION : Share information + Friend other orgs + Host discussions + Educate patrons + Post pics/vids + Target specific users.(Source: ALA TechSource: FB in the Library, November 2011)
  • 13. OPEN SOURCE MOVEMENTMIT OPEN COURSEWARE INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY • Provides open access to institutional research output by self-archiving it • Creates global visibility for an institutions scholarly research • Collect content in a single location • Stores and preserves other institutional digital assets, including unpublished or otherwise easily lost ("grey") literature (e.g., theses or technical reports).
  • 14. IMPACT OF DIGITAL ON ACADEMIC LIBRARIES• Libraries must be nimble – willing to adopt new digital products & services• Librarians must engage in on-going professional development, stay abreast of and create new library offerings• Librarians on the front lines teaching students & faculty about collections, discovery & use of digital resources• Continued partnerships with faculty, students: Helping imbed learning, teaching new digital products, imbed into course management systems, facilitate open source data/publishing• Digital products & search tools on library websites: Provides unique opportunities for students to access and discover more library resources.
  • 15. THE FUTURE – ACADEMIC LIBRARIES• Embrace and digitize unique collections, consider institutional repository for academic work• Librarians to be fluent in using social networking• Continued funding for librarian education & training to relate library services to the ongoing mobile information revolution• Decouple procedures from infrastructure – be willing to use tools our patrons use, not expect them to use the tools we want them to use.