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TVA Kingston Fly Ash Pond Spill Photo Slide Show

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24 slides of images of the December 22, 2008 Kingston Fossil Plant coal ash retention pond failure collected from various government agencies including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the …

24 slides of images of the December 22, 2008 Kingston Fossil Plant coal ash retention pond failure collected from various government agencies including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Published in: Art & Photos

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  • 1. TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY KINGSTON FLY ASH POND SPILL PHOTO SLIDE SHOW
    • Southern Appalachian Information Node
    • National Biological Information Infrastructure
    • http://sain.nbii.gov
  • 2.
    • The Thematic Mapper on NASA’s Landsat 5 satellite captured this image of the Kingston Fossil Plant and its surroundings on November 20, 2008, a month before the spill. In this image, the slurry containment pond is located in the center, at the confluence of the Emory and Clinch River.
    [Photo: National Aeronautics and Space Administration]
  • 3.
    • A second image obtained on December 22, 2008, immediately after the spill. In the false-color images, water appears blue, and sediment-laden water appears light blue.
    [Photo: National Aeronautics and Space Administration]
  • 4.
    • This photo shows the Kingston Plant coal ash retention pond in July, 2006, two years before before the dike failure on December 22, 2008.
    [Photo: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 5.
    • This photo shows the Kingston Plant following the coal ash retention pond failure.
    [Photo: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 6.
    • This photo shows the Kingston Plant coal ash retention pond following the coal ash retention pond failure. TVA has disposed of fly ash at this location since 1958. Over 1 billion gallons of fly ash slurry escaped from the retention pond.
    [Photo: Tennessee Valley Authority / U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 7.
    • A second view of the Kingston Fossil Plant coal ash retention pond failure, dated January 8, 2009. The original retention pond covered 40 acres; 300 acres of land were covered in several feet of coal ash.
    [Photo: Tennessee Valley Authority / U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 8.
    • Property damaged includes this residence along the shore of the Emory River.
    [Photo: Tennessee Valley Authority / U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 9.
    • A closer view of a damaged property.
    [Photo: Steven Alexander, United States Fish and Wildlife Service]
  • 10.
    • This residence was washed from its foundation and came to rest on a roadway.
    [Photo: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 11.
    • This aerial photograph shows coal ash sludge in the Emory River.
    [Photo: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 12.
    • This January 8, 2009 aerial photograph shows coal ash sludge at the point of entry in the Emory River. The remaining dredge cells and failed retention pond are visible at left.
    [Photo: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 13.
    • To prevent currents from further spreading the ash downstream, temporary rock weirs were constructed on the Emory and Clinch Rivers. This photo depicts Southern Weir 1 under construction on December 27, 2008.
    [Photo: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency]
  • 14.
    • Barges were used in the construction of the Rock Weirs.
    [Photo: U.S. Tennessee Valley Authority]
  • 15.
    • TVA temporary dike/weir being constructed in the Emory River arm (embayment) of Lower Watts Bar Reservoir.
    [Photo: Steven Alexander, United States Fish and Wildlife Service]
  • 16.
    • Formed during coal combustion, lightweight cenospheres float on the water’s surface around the rock weir, while a floating orange boom prevents their spread further downstream.
    [Photo: Tennessee Valley Authority]
  • 17.
    • Floating cenospheres were corralled by floating booms and collected by vacuum equipped trucks.
    [Photo: Tennessee Valley Authority]
  • 18.
    • Trucks dispose of collected cenospheres in temporary holding ponds.
    [Photo: Tennessee Valley Authority]
  • 19.
    • Dozens of pieces of heavy equipment including amphibious track hoes were brought in to remove the coal ash.
    [Photos: Tennessee Valley Authority] At left, heavy equipment dwarfed by the expanse of the accident site works on a new road used for weir construction.
  • 20.
    • The cleanup operation continued after dark, working 24 hours a day, and is expected to take months to complete.
    [Photos: Tennessee Valley Authority]
  • 21.
    • View of Fly Ash Sludge Slide looking toward remaining intact impoundment berm.
    [Photo: Steven Alexander, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service]
  • 22.
    • Fly ash sludge visible in the Emory River.
    [Photo: Steven Alexander, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service]
  • 23.
    • The long-term ecological impact is not yet known. Here, Buffleheads ( Bucephala albeola ) can be seen in the TVA Kingston Steam Plant sluice pond.
    [Photo: Steven Alexander, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service]
  • 24. For more information about the Kingston Fly Ash Pond Spill http://sain.nbii.gov/ecosystems