SOPA/PIPA and the Rise of Networked Public Power
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SOPA/PIPA and the Rise of Networked Public Power

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These are the slides I used for "Power Politics in the Age of Google," a public panel presented by the Shorenstein Center of the Harvard Kennedy School on Feb 9, 2012.

These are the slides I used for "Power Politics in the Age of Google," a public panel presented by the Shorenstein Center of the Harvard Kennedy School on Feb 9, 2012.

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SOPA/PIPA and the Rise of Networked Public Power SOPA/PIPA and the Rise of Networked Public Power Presentation Transcript

  • January 18, 2012 The Rise of Networked Public Power Micah L. Sifry
  • November 15, 2011 
  •   November 17, 2011 
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  • December 29, 2011 
  • January 16, 2011 
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  • December 10, 2011
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  • January 13, 2012
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  • January 16, 2011 
  • Tumblr
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  • Google
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  • TwitPic
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  • BoingBoing.net
  • 115,000 Websites Participated on January 18
  • What Google Did
  • What Wikipedia Did
    • Wikipedia’s pages on SOPA/PIPA accessed 162 million times on January 18
    • More than 8 million people used Wikipedia’s tool to look up their representatives’ contact info
    • One percent of all tweets on Jan 18 use #wikipediablackout
  • What Firefox Did
    • 30 million people saw the call to action on Firefox’s launch page
    • 1.8 million went to a special Mozilla.org page to learn more
    • 360,000 of those went to an EFF page to send emails opposing the bills
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  • 5 Million Watched Their Video
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  • Congress Responds