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Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
Reputation, Crisis and Social Media
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Reputation, Crisis and Social Media

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Crisis and Reputation Management in the context of Social Media

Crisis and Reputation Management in the context of Social Media

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  • 1. 1 CRISIS & SOCIAL MEDIA YOUR REPUTATION IS PRECIOUS … Lars Voedisch Principal Consultant lars@preciouscomms.com @larsv
  • 2. • Independent, boutique communications consultancy • Based out of Singapore, at home in Asia and Europe • Globally connected via affiliation with About Us… +65 – 3151 4760 larsvoed 21 Club Street #02-11 Singapore 069410 connect@preciouscomms.com Facebook.com/PReciousComms Twitter.com/PReciousComms
  • 3. 3 PRecious Partners Brands PRecious Communications and our consultants have worked with . . .
  • 4. What is reputation management for you? 4 Quick discussion in: What is reputation for you?
  • 5. Reputation 5 [rep-yuh-tey-shuhn] What is a reputation?  The beliefs or opinions that are held by someone or something by the community or general public.
  • 6. • What is a crisis?  unexpected, creating uncertainty, seen as a threat • What usually happens: panic, delay of pro-active decision- making, fear of overreacting, getting pushed in a defensive position • How social media requires us to step up our game in terms of speed, cooperating, and preparedness • Why we are afraid of it: it tests our preparation and leadership qualities as it is all about making (fast) decisions 6 PART 1 CRISIS DYNAMICS: GET IT FAST, GET IT RIGHT, GET IT OVER
  • 7. 7 By the time you hear the thunder, it’s too late to build the ark.
  • 8. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? 8
  • 9. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? 9 When a crisis happens: Get it fast, Get it right, Get it out, and Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin Time is crucial for managing risk as it allows you to stay in the ‘driver seat’
  • 10. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? 10 When a crisis happens: Get it fast, Get it right, Get it out, and Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin Time is crucial for managing risk as it allows you to stay in the ‘driver seat’ 33% of global CCOs are not prepared for social media based reputation threats !!!
  • 11. Nestlé's social media crisis 11
  • 12. Nestlé's social media crisis Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign 12
  • 13. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page 13
  • 14. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” 14
  • 15. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) 15
  • 16. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable 16
  • 17. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) 17 Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable
  • 18. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) 18 Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable What are your Rules of Engagement? A crisis response protocol? How fast can you react? Who decides?
  • 19. 19 Key Learnings? PART 1 CRISIS DYNAMICS: GET IT FAST, GET IT RIGHT, GET IT OVER
  • 20. 20 PART 2 CRISIS POTENTIAL: MANAGING PROBABILITIES Every industry has potential for crises. How can we identify them at the earliest possible point whenever and wherever it might strike? • Assessing potential crisis issues and identify possible counter measures on- and offline • Working with the various internal stakeholder groups to identify potential crisis areas • How the right media monitoring setup can help you identify issues ahead of time and why social media is a key component  Can you separate the noise from the relevant input?  How do you set your triggers?  Do you know your influence?
  • 21. Holistic View of Crisis Management 21 Source: Issue Management and Crisis Management: - Tony Jaques
  • 22. Holistic View of Crisis Management 22
  • 23. Holistic View of Crisis Management 23
  • 24. Holistic View of Crisis Management 24
  • 25. Holistic View of Crisis Management 25
  • 26. Let’s talk business 26 Not me… Who has a crisis plan? Nope :)
  • 27. The majority of all crises come from within an organization. 29
  • 28. Understanding how crises evolve 31 On average over the past 20-years, about one-third of all crises were the sudden type – fires, explosions, natural disasters and workplace violence. Source: Annual ICM Report 2011 – Institute for Crisis Management
  • 29. Crises—What are the main causes? 32 1. Management Decisions / Indecisions 2. Human Error / Mistakes 3. Operational or Mechanical Problems 4. Acts of God
  • 30. 34 Key Learnings? PART 2 CRISIS POTENTIAL: MANAGING PROBABILITIES
  • 31. How has social media changed the way we to deal with crisis situations? What are the key platforms that we have to look into and what should be some of the best practices and key action points to stick to when you’re on red alert? • Understanding platforms and audiences: Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube • Social media and crisis management: Common mistakes • What are your rules of engagement when it comes to handling social media? • Setting up a social media command centre • Maintain your share of voice online—how to be heard when everyone else is talking 35 PART 3 INTERNET, SOCIAL MEDIA, MOBILE
  • 32. Quick Discussion 36 How and why is social media relevant to your brand’s reputation?
  • 33. 37 Source: What happens on the Internet every 60 seconds - Rosa Golijan
  • 34. Social Media Disaster “Highlights” 38 Not only be timely, and get the facts right – also choose the appropriate tone!
  • 35. Social Media Disaster “Highlights” 39 Timing is important…know what’s happening in your company, and current news.
  • 36. 40Source: Digital Life 2011 - TNS 32% 11% 13% 45% What are people saying? Do people in Singapore trust comments people write about brands?
  • 37. 41 What are people saying? Do people in Hong Kong trust comments people write about brands? I write comments about brands to… Source: Digital Life - TNS
  • 38. 42 What are people saying? 42 Do people in China trust comments people write about brands? I write comments about brands to… Source: Digital Life - TNS
  • 39. The PR Perspective: Social or not—it’s media relations?! 43
  • 40. Social Media Relations: What changes? 44 Everything Changes • It’s about two-way conversations • You’ve to deal with more channels • We HAVE to listen and understand what’s said! • What about those negative comments and posts? • The game get’s so much faster Nothing Changes • You’ve to manage relationships • So it’s wires, print, broadcast – and social media • You already: monitor and analyze your media coverage • Not every negative comment means a crisis • Already forgot newswires? Look at trends over time
  • 41. 45 Key Learnings? PART 3 INTERNET, SOCIAL MEDIA, MOBILE
  • 42. 46 How do you draw the line between noise and relevance? What are some key tools and strategies for monitoring social media? What is a good way to respond to negative and positive feedback? What do brands need to do to capture the attention & loyalty of consumers? PART 4 HOW TO BE A GOOD LISTENER
  • 43. 99.9% Noise 47
  • 44. 90-9-1 Principle: The Inequality of the Web 48Source: Jakob Nielsen - Participation Inequality: Encouraging More Users to Contribute
  • 45. Understanding social media in China 49 Some 76 percent of China users are “creators” of content, that is, they are active posters rather than mere spectators. That compares to just 25 percent in the US. Chinese microblog stories spread faster and at a significantly larger scale, than those in the US. Because most Chinese lack trust in formal institutions, users disproportionately value the advice from consumers in social networks. Source: Fighting a PR Fire in China with Social Media – McKinsey
  • 46. Know Your Trigger Points How bad (or good) is it? Where does a CRISIS happen vs. where does it start? How does the story play out in traditional and social media?
  • 47. Your users are mobile—are you? 51 About half of social media users access their networks on the go That means: It is a real anybody, anywhere, anytime world Are your online assets optimized for mobile? Do you leverage mobile for your crisis plans and activation?
  • 48. Case Study: Social Media Command Centre 52 Demand for social reputation management Components –Issue –Impact –Influence –Engage Leveraging proprietary data assets & methodologies Moving to 24/7 operation
  • 49. 53 • Identify high impact issues by company, sector, broad, time prioritized • Produce high grade Twitter stream • Produce high grade twitter stream CommEq • Filter and refine • Find and visualize connections • Streamed to client teams and Engagement teams Commetric • High fidelity issue management Client High impact twitter stream
  • 50. Client benefits 54  Directs reputation management efforts  Drives real time engagement  Increases social intelligence  Reduces fear levels of C-Suite
  • 51. Command center benefits  Issue warning: immediate assessment of scale and contagion of social storm  Quantifying impact: focuses exec attention and provides justification for comms response  Influencer tracking: delivers road map for messaging and engagement of response 62
  • 52. 63 Key Learnings? PART 4 HOW TO BE A GOOD LISTENER
  • 53. 64 Being prepared is everything! • How to identify and prepare for different crisis scenarios? What could be critical decisions and are the right people pre-authorized to make them? • How should your activation plans look like; who would need to get involved in your crisis team for which scenario? • Developing a crisis handbook as your first-stop manual with basic scenarios and prepared reactions – drafting a first response checklist • Why a social media crisis plan should be at the TOP of every brand and organization’s to-do list, before they begin to market on social media PART 5 BEFORE THE CRISIS
  • 54. Reputation Crisis Preparedness Before the crisis • What constitutes a real crisis • Scenario planning (internal / external) • Business continuity vs communications • Assessing potential crisis issues (audit) • Crisis-management team • Setting up emergency communication plans (internal / external, channels) • Regular checks, updates, refreshers • Activation plans (eg for external partners) 65
  • 55. What tone do you like to read on Facebook or Twitter? Witty? Edgy? Angry? • Always be helpful, humble and friendly. • These are 3 attitudes that will work well in any business. • Be wary of the metaphors and imagery you or your writer use – they say a lot about your business. How To Choose The Tone For Your Content? 66Source: How To Choose The Tone For Your Content – Social Media Magic Don’t forget: In Social Media you want to connect people with people!
  • 56. What Social Media Tone Is Best for Your Business? • Baby food: Use an educational tone in your social media so customers can make informed decisions • Meaningful gifts: Invoke a humble, empathetic and enlightening tone that keeps the brand linked to inspiration • Bags: By injecting a youthful, personable, upbeat and feminine tone in your social media, you could invite young customers across to indulge in your products • Cookies: A playful and inviting tone works best at alluring customers to indulge in childhood comfort foods • Designer products: Employ a serious and curious tone in its social media What Is Your Social Media Personality? 67Source: What Social Media Tone Is Best for Your Business – Fox Business
  • 57. What Social Media Tone Is Best for Your Business? • Baby food: Use an educational tone in your social media so customers can make informed decisions • Meaningful gifts: Invoke a humble, empathetic and enlightening tone that keeps the brand linked to inspiration • Bags: By injecting a youthful, personable, upbeat and feminine tone in your social media, you could invite young customers across to indulge in your products • Cookies: A playful and inviting tone works best at alluring customers to indulge in childhood comfort foods • Designer products: Employ a serious and curious tone in its social media What Is Your Social Media Personality? 68Source: What Social Media Tone Is Best for Your Business – Fox Business
  • 58. What happened in Huili county / Sichuan . . . 71
  • 59. Siemens Refrigerator Crisis in China • Famous English Trainer talks about problems on Weibo • He is not satisfied by Siemens reaction and attitude • Refrigerators are publicly smashed • Siemens PR agency threatens media 72 The top five re-tweeted users on Weibo have more than one million retweets per person, as opposed to only a little more than five thousand for the top five re- tweeted users on Twitter. Source: How can we practice ethical PR – Sue’s PR Blog
  • 60. And now a look at the corporate world 73 Background: 1) Siemens just announce d a new record profit 2) Layoff of over 1300 staff announce d
  • 61. Think Process: Response Chart 74
  • 62. How to Deal with Comments—YOUR Response Plan 75 • Comment / Blog Post Validity • Level of Responsibility • Level of Respect • The Commenter is a Troll / Rager • The Commenter is a Spammer by Nature
  • 63. The BIGGER Picture: What’s Your Engagement Plan? 76 What can/should your staff say – or not? Do you have a proper escalation path? How do you get ready for ‘beta’ mode?
  • 64. 77 Key Learnings? PART 5 BEFORE THE CRISIS
  • 65. Crisis Communications “Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care.” Theodore Roosevelt 78
  • 66. Crisis Survival Lessons for the Social Media Age • Size doesn’t matter – A failure to engage a captive and influential audience represents an utter misunderstanding of the power that online communities wield in crisis. • What Got You Here, Won’t Get You There – It is essential to at least assuage consumer fears by acknowledging the problem and affirming that all that can be done is being done • You Can Not Advertise Out of Crisis – Traditional advertising and brand/reputation management cannot work in a galaxy where crisis moves at the speed of light. 79Source: 3 Crisis Survival Lessons for the Social Media Age – Dallas Lawrence/Mashable
  • 67. Crisis Survival Lessons for the Social Media Age 80 In a crisis, consumers need honest answers and they need them fast – and no messaging vehicle is better suited to meet this demand than those fueling the crisis in the first place. Transparent engagements in the online communities, where your customers already live, provide a credible and direct channel for the answers they need.
  • 68. Pressing the delete button for comments? Some reasons that might be acceptable… • Racism • Sexism • Verbal abuse • Inappropriate language • Pornographic content • (Blatant hostile behaviour toward other community members) However: It is imperative that you have a policy on your Facebook page if you choose to delete content! 81Source: 5 ways to handle negative Facebook comments - PR Daily
  • 69. Pressing the delete button for comments? Some reasons that might be acceptable… 82Source: 5 ways to handle negative Facebook comments - PR Daily […] At the same time, fans should show courtesy and respect to others and must not use the wall to abuse others, expose others to offensive or inappropriate content, or for any illegal purpose. […] and may remove any posted messages that it considers to be in breach of the Policy.
  • 70. 83 Key Learnings? PART 5 AS THE CRISIS EMERGES: ACTIVATION
  • 71. 84 Any questions or comments? SUMMARY
  • 72. About PRecious Communications International Communications Expertise with a Passion for Technology • PRecious Communications is a young and energetic, yet strategic communications and public relations consultancy serving B2C and B2B companies • Our focus is on corporate communications, crisis management, public relations and social media. • It combines a clear business-oriented approach with a focus on measurable results that tie directly into its clients’ overall communications objectives. • The firm is run out of Singapore and serves clients throughout Asia Pacific. • PRecious was officially started in early 2012 by Lars Voedisch, an experienced global communications and business professional with 15 years expertise in growing, managing and defending leading global brands’ reputation across industry sectors. Background & Expertise • Combined work experience include: AIESEC, AT&T, Citi, Coca Cola, DBS, DHL, Dow Jones, EDS, GIC, Honda, HP, Huawei, ING, InMobi, Lenovo, Motorola, OpenNet, Palm, Panasonic, Porsche, Procter & Gamble, Yahoo!, VMware 85
  • 73. • Communications Strategy • Traditional & Social Media Relations • Digital Engagement • Crisis Preparedness & Management • Internal Communications • Media Training • Analysis, Measurement, Research Your reputation is PRecious… Our Service Offerings

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