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Women in fruit and vegetable value chain development
 

Women in fruit and vegetable value chain development

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Poster for the ‘Market-Oriented Smallholder Development: IPMS Experience-Sharing Workshop,’ Addis Ababa, 2-3 June 2011

Poster for the ‘Market-Oriented Smallholder Development: IPMS Experience-Sharing Workshop,’ Addis Ababa, 2-3 June 2011

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    Women in fruit and vegetable value chain development Women in fruit and vegetable value chain development Document Transcript

    • Women in fruit and vegetable value chain development Background • Women are major players in crop production including vegetables and fruits,  however they have limited  control over income from the sale of these crops • In most cases, men have land entitlement, hence women have limited access to resources and income • To benefit women from crop value chain development, IPMS targeted women in its input supply  interventions specifically in – Fruit seedling production and marketing – Vegetable seed/seedling production and marketing Key interventions  Target and support women and landless  youths in: • Skills and knowledge provision on nursery  management including grafting • Input supply linkage for  – Mother tree establishment for scion  production – Nursery tools supply  • Engage regulatory body for certification of  seed/seedling  • Market linkages Lessons learned and challenges • Gender sensitive commodity value chain development approach helps women to participate in the  value chain • Improved fruit and vegetable seedling production is appropriate for women and the landless  • Provision of knowledge and skills in seedling and seed production can move women from labour  contributors to major value chain actors • Linking women to input and output actors increases the sustainability of fruit and vegetable value  chains•This document is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution‐Noncommercial‐Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.