Biodiversity value of fodder shrub plantings

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Biodiversity value of fodder shrub plantings

  1. 1. Biodiversity value of fodder shrub plantings Dr Andrew Fisher Department of Water, Land and Biodiversity Conservation 22 June 2010 1
  2. 2. Production Perennials for Biodiversity Project Logic: What does native biodiversity need to survive? How do current landscapes provide these needs? What can be done to provide what is lacking? 2
  3. 3. Production Perennials for Biodiversity 3
  4. 4. Project History Fauna use of Oil mallees WA & SA database of resource requirements d t b f i t WA reptile project SA fodder shrub work SA Complementary State NRM funded project 4
  5. 5. Biodiversity value of planted saltbush Preliminary investigation – plants, birds, invertebrates Saltbush, Pasture, Remnant 5 sites per treatment Spring & Autumn 5
  6. 6. Bird species richness 16 a 12 Number of species 8 b N 4 c 0 Remnant Saltbush Pasture Treatment Combined seasonal data 6
  7. 7. Bird abundance data ▲/ ∆ = Remnant, ● / ○ = Saltbush, / □ = Pasture. Shaded =Spring 2008 Unshaded = Autumn 2009 7
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  12. 12. PP4B project evolution Focus of field work moved to SA – personnel hub PhD student from March 2010 Revision of scope & deliverables 12
  13. 13. PP4B – revision Can saltbush-based farming systems improve biodiversity security in the SA Murray Mallee? y y “security” = persistence Two sub-projects: Resource connectivity (birds) – Fisher et al. al Functional connectivity (lizards) – Smyth et al. 13
  14. 14. South Australia Study Area 14
  15. 15. Resource connectivity For selected bird species: Foraging: food availability & how gathered Reproductive success Comparisons at landscape scale 15
  16. 16. R s R R vs vs s R R Intact mallee Fragmented mallee with Fragmented mallee with saltbush plantings conventional grazing R = remnant mallee s = saltbush planting 16
  17. 17. Field Methods For selected bird species: Survival = food, protection Breeding = nest materials, nest sites, food for young Techniques may i l d T h i include: Territory mapping Observations of foraging movements Time budgets Nest observations Predation (adults, eggs, young) – observation/artificial nests/remote recordings Observations of dispersal movements Ob ti f di l t 17
  18. 18. Plans from here Literature review & synthesis Confirm sites Test methods Data collection Analysis A l i Report/paper(s) by June 2011 18
  19. 19. Autumn 2009 Spring 2008 19
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  22. 22. Outputs Output 5.1 Management & decision packages that promote farming systems that integrate p g y g production and biodiversity y outcomes Conceptual model developed Data collection / model refinement to June 2011 Report = paper(s) Guidelines for saltbush management 22
  23. 23. Outputs (cont.) Collard & Fisher (2010) Shrub-based plantings of woody p perennial vegetation in temperate Australian agricultural g p g landscapes: What benefits for native biodiversity? Ecological Management & Restoration 11(1): 31 – 35 Smith, Fisher, Collard (in prep) - synthesis p p on resource , , ( p p) y paper provided for vertebrates in woody perennial farming systems Smyth et al. – paper(s) on functional connectivity Richards - PhD thesis Convening ESA symposium Dec 2010: Biodiversity conservation in agricultural landscapes: is it really worth the effort? 23
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