Epicenter Research Slides - Open 2012

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  • Suggest making numbers larger (or maybe just the percent associated with the green slice)
    We may want this to be a build up slide, starting with showing the green slide in the three practices, then the light green, then the light pink, then the bright pink. (this is important to establishing the four categories)
  • Suggest making numbers larger (or maybe just the percent associated with the green slice)
    We may want this to be a build up slide, starting with showing the green slide in the three practices, then the light green, then the light pink, then the bright pink. (this is important to establishing the four categories)
  • Suggest making numbers larger (or maybe just the percent associated with the green slice)
    We may want this to be a build up slide, starting with showing the green slide in the three practices, then the light green, then the light pink, then the bright pink. (this is important to establishing the four categories)
  • Suggest making numbers larger (or maybe just the percent associated with the green slice)
    We may want this to be a build up slide, starting with showing the green slide in the three practices, then the light green, then the light pink, then the bright pink. (this is important to establishing the four categories)
  • We should probably include the prompt, so the reviewer knows what the percentage was responding to.
  • I suggest a build-up slide on this….let’s talk through what this might be.
  • Let’s think about how to do a slide build up on this.
    Remove hum and pre-college, and start with important then important and practiced
  • Select up to five of the red.
    Build up: first gray up and down, then add green and red
  • Select up to five of the red.
    Build up: first gray up and down, then add green and red
  • Select up to five of the red.
    Build up: first gray up and down, then add green and red
  • And these types exist in the real world.
    Consider a common group experience called a New Product Development Team: 6 or more people, multi-functional (read functions)
    The question is how does this difference in problem solving preference moderate information sharing and team decision making?

Transcript

  • 1. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Learning— Shaking up Research and Assessment NCIIA Open Conference March 22-24, 2012 –San Francisco Grant Number: 1125457 Sheri Sheppard, Shannon Gilmartin, Angela Shartrand
  • 2. Epicenter Mission The Epicenter is dedicated to unleashing the entrepreneurial potential of undergraduate engineering students across the United States to create bold innovators with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to contribute to economic and societal prosperity.
  • 3. Definitions Entrepreneurs have the knowledge, skills and mindset required to identify and solve problems, and to seize opportunities. [entrepreneurial thinking] Innovation means to create new products, services and processes which produce positive economic and societal impact. [innovative thinking]
  • 4. Starting Point: Data from Faculty and Student Surveys Faculty Data: Jamieson & Lohmann (2011). Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Student Data: Duval-Couetil, Reed-Rhoads, & Haghighi (2012). Engineering Students and Entrepreneurship Education: Involvement, Attitudes and Outcomes. International Journal of Engineering Education, 28 (2), pp. 425–435. (Reproduced with permission)
  • 5. Collaborative learning Experiential learning (e.g., PBL) Inquiry-based learning Faculty are already incorporating innovative teaching practices Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 6. Collaborative learning Experiential learning (e.g., PBL) Inquiry-based learning Faculty are already incorporating innovative teaching practices Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 7. Collaborative learning Experiential learning (e.g., PBL) Inquiry-based learning Faculty are already incorporating innovative teaching practices Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 8. Collaborative learning Experiential learning (e.g., PBL) Inquiry-based learning Faculty are already incorporating innovative teaching practices Question: •How might we best leverage these pedagogies in entrepreneurship education? Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 9. Entrepreneurship doesn’t rank high in importance for engineering faculty Rate the importance of engaging undergraduate students in the following learning environments, in advancing a culture of scholarly and systematic innovation in engineering education: Plotted percentages are the aggregate of “Important” and “Highly important” responses Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 10. Question: •How might we explore the rationale of the 46.8% and 5.5% who think entrepreneurship is not important? Entrepreneurship doesn’t rank high in importance for engineering faculty, but there are different opportunities Important PracticedNot Practiced Not Important 16.5% 5.5% 31.2% 46.8% Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission. =47.7%
  • 11. Engineering programs interact with industry, less so with other programs Survey item: Collaborating with these stakeholders in educational innovation is… ◉ Important ◉ Important and Practiced Question: •How might we leverage the established relationship with industry in strengthening entrepreneurship education? Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 12. % agreement with statement Students’ Attitudes about Entrepreneurship Education Sample: 501 engineering students enrolled in senior-level capstone design courses at three large public universities with established entrepreneurship programs. NO ENTREP COURSES Data source: Duval-Couetil, N., T. Reed-Rhoads, & Haghighi, S. (2011). Engineering Students and Entrepreneurship Education: Involvement, Attitudes and Outcomes,International Journal of Engineering Education, in press. Aspirations and perceived impact
  • 13. % agreement with statement Students’ Attitudes about Entrepreneurship Education Sample: 501 engineering students enrolled in senior-level capstone design courses at three large public universities with established entrepreneurship programs. Data source: Duval-Couetil, N., T. Reed-Rhoads, & Haghighi, S. (2011). Engineering Students and Entrepreneurship Education: Involvement, Attitudes and Outcomes,International Journal of Engineering Education, in press. NO ENTREP COURSES Offerings and opportunities Aspirations and perceived impact
  • 14. % agreement with statement * * * * Students’ Attitudes about Entrepreneurship Education Sample: 501 engineering students enrolled in senior-level capstone design courses at three large public universities with established entrepreneurship programs. Data source: Duval-Couetil, N., T. Reed-Rhoads, & Haghighi, S. (2011). Engineering Students and Entrepreneurship Education: Involvement, Attitudes and Outcomes,International Journal of Engineering Education, in press. NO ENTREP COURSES ENTREP COURSES Aspirations and perceived impact Offerings and opportunities
  • 15. • Faculty are already incorporating innovative teaching practices • Few engineering faculty feel that entrepreneurship is important and practiced in their programs … but there are opportunities • Engineering programs do a good job of interacting with industry, and there are untapped opportunities to interact with other colleagues on campus • Engineering students are interested in entrepreneurship, but do not necessarily see it as being practiced, discussed, or encouraged in their programs This helps to situate today’s conversation about what you are seeing and emphasizing in entrepreneurship programs at your campus. Summary…
  • 16. Ways to get involved
  • 17. Creating … Resources, experiences and community for students and faculty A change in thinking New knowledge
  • 18. Our Research Component: some realities Important and practiced instructional approach or environment Labs: 94.5% PBL (Design): now up to 56.9% Entrepreneurship Programs: 16.5% We have a lot to learn from design education and research, and from a diverse community of researchers… Data source: Jamieson & Lohmann, 2011. Innovation with Impact – Draft. ASEE Reproduced with permission.
  • 19. Our Research Component: possible research questions What contributes to faculty’s perceptions of entrepreneurship and innovation? What constitutes evidence of student learning of entrepreneurship and innovation? How do different entrepreneurial endeavors affect students differently? How do innovative new hires fit into organizations? What makes an organization friendly to innovative engineers?
  • 20. Panel Discussion Q&A • What are the key skills/abilities/attitudes you think are important for entrepreneurship and innovation? • How does your course/pedagogy help students develop these skills/abilities/attitudes? • How do you know your course/pedagogy is effective? (~5 min each + 15/20 min Q&A)
  • 21. Project: CAREER: A Study of How Engineering Students Approach Innovation Panelists Dr. Şenay Purzer Purdue University
  • 22. Cognition Behavior Motivation Associating ObservingNetworking Questioning Experimenting Enjoyment Valuing Şenay Purzer, Kavin Nataraja, Tuba Mirza, James He, Billy Myers, Nick Fila Acknowledgement: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. (NSF CAREER 1150874).
  • 23. Teaching Innovation Skills & Processes to Engineering Students Şenay Purzer (spurzer@purdue.edu) NCIIA March 23, 1012 Engineering Students' Definition of Innovation Understanding how students define innovation is a critical component necessary as we develop curricula that support student innovation skills. The purpose of this study was to identify engineering students’ understanding of innovation in two ways: 1) by directly asking them to provide their definition of innovation, and 2) by asking them to evaluate the innovative qualities of six products. The participants were 50 first-year engineering students who completed a first-year engineering design course. Students’ completed a series of open-ended questions provided in a word document. These responses were first reviewed to identify emer • How Does Teaching Support These skills? • Current: • Open-ended design project: Students identify a need & develop solutions • Future: • Reflective journals showing evidence for the use of 7 innovative thinker’s attributes (associating, questioning, etc.)
  • 24. Assessing Engineering Students’ Approaches to Innovation Şenay Purzer (spurzer@purdue.edu) NCIIA March 23, 1012 Engineering Students' Definition of Innovation Understanding how students define innovation is a critical component necessary as we develop curricula that support student innovation skills. The purpose of this study was to identify engineering students’ understanding of innovation in two ways: 1) by directly asking them to provide their definition of innovation, and 2) by asking them to evaluate the innovative qualities of six products. The participants were 50 first-year engineering students who completed a first-year engineering design course. Students’ completed a series of open-ended questions provided in a word document. These responses were first reviewed to identify emer • How Do You Know It Is Working? • Current (research & assessment): • Observations: Teams moving from focusing on “own needs” to others’ needs • Innovation Metric: Evaluation of ideas generated • Future (research & assessment): • Correlation: Evidence for the use of innovative thinker’s 7 attributes vs. solution innovation quality • Comparison: Gender, cultural, grade level differences
  • 25. Dr. Mark Schar Stanford University Project: Global Innovation Panelists
  • 26. “Innovation refers to the overall process whereby an invention is transformed into a commercial product that can be sold profitably.” (Crawford and Di Benedetto, 2008) Experience Prototype Dark Horse Prototype Functional System Prototype Funky Prototype Reference Model Prototype ME310 Global Innovation Engineering •Established 1967; partnership with Corporations (+200) •28-32 master’s level students/year (mostly ME’s) •28-40 master’s level students from Global universities •8-9 teams/year; reciprocal travel •Three quarters, about 1/3 of master’s requirements •Two Professors, 3 Course Assistants, Administrator •Students go to work for product management companies
  • 27. Engineering Manager New Product Development (NPD) Team Finance Manager Marketing Manager Sales Manager Human Resources Manager ME310X – Product Management Mindsets Session Topics: 1.What is Product Management? 2.Getting a Product Management Job 3.Leadership and New Product Development 4.The Finance Mindset 5.The Sales Mindset 6.The HR Mindset 7.The Marketing Mindset 8.NPD Strategy 9.Personal Selling: Winning Ethically •3 hour sessions, 3 per quarter •MBA Materials: Harvard, Stanford •Case Study and Discussion •Simulation •“Real World” Guests • 100% Placement (61 students), multiple offers • “ME310X Certificate of Product Management” • www.bit.ly/ME310X
  • 28. Dr. Nathalie Duval-Couetil Purdue University Project: Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program Panelists
  • 29. Dr. Lawrence Neeley Olin College Project: Innovation through Design+Entrepreneurship Panelists
  • 30. Panel Discussion • What are the key skills/abilities/attitudes you think are important for entrepreneurship and innovation? • How does your course/pedagogy help students develop these skills/abilities/attitudes? • How do you know your course/pedagogy is effective? (~5 min each + 15/20 min Q&A)
  • 31. 1. Map how important and practiced entrepreneurship is in: Important PracticedNot Practiced Not Important X Your classroom  Your Institution # Your Program (place in the appropriate quadrant) 2. What are the Entrepreneurship/Innovation skills students should acquire? _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ Name (optional): _____________________________________________
  • 32. Table Discussions 1. What key skills/abilities/attitudes are necessary for innovation and entrepreneurship? 2. What course/pedagogies have you or your program been experimenting with? [or, what roles might your organization play in helping students learn these things?] 3. What would you really like to know about entrepreneurship and/or innovation education?
  • 33. Bio Sketch Şenay Purzer is an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering Education and is the Director of Assessment Research for the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning (INSPIRE) at Purdue University. In 2012, Dr. Purzer received a NSF CAREER award, which examines how engineering students approach innovation. She is currently leading projects funded by NSF, NASA, and corporate foundations. She has journal publications on instrument development/validation, teaming & design education, and teacher professional development. She is also an editorial board member for the Journal of Pre-College Engineering Education (JPEER). Purzer has received her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Science Education at Arizona State University. She has a B.S. degree in Physics Education and a B.S.E. in Engineering.
  • 34. Mark Schar Mark works in the Center for Design Research at Stanford; he is a member of the Symbiotic Project of Affective Neuroscience Lab or "spanlab" at Stanford; and he is a lecturer in the School of Engineering. Mark's area of research is the intersection of design thinking and the neuroscience of choice where he has several research projects underway. Mark comes to us from a 30 year career in industry as a Vice President with The Procter & Gamble Company and Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer with Intuit here in Silicon Valley. Mark has a BSS from Northwestern University, an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management and his PhD is from Stanford University.
  • 35. Nathalie Duval-Couetil Purdue University Nathalie Duval-Couetil is the Director of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program, Associate Director of the Burton D. Morgan Center, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Technology Leadership and Innovation at Purdue University. She is responsible for the launch and development of the university’s multidisciplinary undergraduate entrepreneurship program, which has involved over 3500 students from all majors since 2005. As part of the program, she has established entrepreneurship capstone, global entrepreneurship, and women and leadership courses and initiatives. Prior to her work in academia, Nathalie spent several years in the field of market research and business strategy consulting in Europe and the United States with Booz Allen and Hamilton and Data and Strategies Group. She received a BA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, an MBA from Babson College, and MS and PhD degrees from Purdue University.
  • 36. Lawrence Neeley is an Assistant Professor of Design and Entrepreneurship at Olin College in Needham, MA. He brings to Olin his passion for design, prototyping, manufacturing and entrepreneurship. Both his research and educational efforts center upon helping designers rapidly imagine, realize and offer compelling real world products. Before coming to Olin full time, Lawrence spent three years as a postdoctoral associate in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lawrence holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Center for Design Research at Stanford University. He also holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Lawrence Neeley Olin College of Engineering