• Save
The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia (1940 - 1991)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia (1940 - 1991)

on

  • 876 views

Presentation by Prof. em. Dr. Valters Nollendorfs (Chairman of the Board Occupation Museum Association of Latvia Occupation Museum Association of Latvia) on the occasion of the EESC hearing on the ...

Presentation by Prof. em. Dr. Valters Nollendorfs (Chairman of the Board Occupation Museum Association of Latvia Occupation Museum Association of Latvia) on the occasion of the EESC hearing on the Europe for Citizens Programme for 2014-2020 (Brussels, 3 May 2012)

Statistics

Views

Total Views
876
Views on SlideShare
858
Embed Views
18

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 18

http://www.eesc.europa.eu 18

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia (1940 - 1991) The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia (1940 - 1991) Presentation Transcript

  • Latvijas Okupācijas muzejs The Museum of theOccupation of Latvia (1940-1991) Prof. em. Dr. Valters Nollendorfs Chairman of the Board Occupation Museum Association of Latvia
  • The present building of the Museum of the Occupation of Latvia.Formerly the Museum of the Red Latvian Riflemen.
  • Design of the futureMuseum of the Occupation of Latvia. Anticipated completion 2014. Architect Gunnar Birkerts. View slide
  • The future Museum of the Occupation and Memorial to Victims Of Communism 2014 View slide
  • Latvijas Okupācijas muzejs The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia Founded 1993. Motto: REMEMBERING, REMINDING, COMMEMORATING. Owned and operated by the Occupation Museum Association. Permanent exhibition completed 1998. Ehibition covers three occupations: Soviet 1940-1941, Nazi-German 1941-1944/45, Soviet 1944/45-1991. Departments: Archive, Documentation, Education, Public History, Memorial Sites, Publication. Annual number of visitors 100 000 plus. Estimated number of foreign visitors ~70 000. Number of employees 38 (including service personnel). Annual operating budget ~EUR 500 000. State/municpal support ~EUR 70 000 (14%). Main sources of revenue: supporters, donations, projects. State accredited Museum; included in State Diplomatic Protocol. State-owned building dedicated to the Museum by state law. Fundraising goal for a new exposition and furnishings: LVL 1,5 mio. New modern exhbition and an expanded building scheduled for 2014. Founding Member Platform of European Memory and Conscience 2011. Participation in major international projects: “Different Nations-Shared Experiences” (Estonia, Sweden, Finland). EU European Regional Development Fund; Centrral altic Interreg IV A Programme.
  • The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia Europe for Citizens Programme projects “Active European Remembrance” 2008: “Development of an Interactive Map of Stalinist Deportations.” Ref. No. REM-2008-007. Budget: EACEA EUR 39 000; Co-Fin. EUR 26 000; Total EUR 65 000. Visitors since 2009: ~250 000. 2010: “Virtual Exhibition on the History of Stalinism and Nazism in Latvia.” Ref. No. 511937. Budget: EACEA EUR 55 000; Co-Fin. EUR 53 000; Total EUR 108 000. Unique visits to date 8500; of those 15% returning visitors; page views 19 000. 2012: ???
  • “Map of Stalinist Deportations” in the Museum of the Occupation of Latvia
  • Beginning of the “Map of Stalinist Deportations” Latvian, English, German, Russian
  • The Mass Deportation 14 June 1941
  • Map of GULAG prison camps in the Soviet Union
  • Additional information:-Deportation arrest orders.-Mementoes from theGULAG prison camps.-Video testimonials aboutimprisonment in the GULAG.
  • Temporary Exhibition “Rumbula: Anatomy of a Crime 1941”.Commemorating the Holocaust in German-Occupied Latvia.
  • Temporary Exhibition “Rumbula: Anatomy of a Crime 1941”.Transition from a virtual exhibition to a new permanent exhibition.
  • The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia Grantwriting Experience and Desiderata The experience with the Programme “Active European Remembrance” has been in general positive and fruitful. The paperwork, though considerable, has not been onerous and both the application and accounting forms are reasonably clear as compared to many others the Museum has had to deal with. The staff has been responsive and helpful. The self-financing percentage is high but manageable; it cuts down on projects that an institution may consider marginal. The restriction of projects to 1953, the death of Stalin, seems arbitrary and must be lifted both for political and practical reasons. In evaluation projects, it is hoped, consideration is given to those with long- term and value-added benefits. Consideration should be given to major significant projects that cannot be carried out within the current grant ceilings and/or completed in a year’s time.
  • The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia Recommendations for Future Consideration There is every reason to continue, improve and expand the Europe for Citizens programme “Active European Remembrance.” The number of memorial sites, museums, civic organisations and research institutes dealing with recent European history and social memory is growing. There exists urgent need for a common understanding of 20th- century European history and its representation in social memory as a basis for a future European identity and solidarity. The “European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism” is only a beginning of a long process of coming to terms with 50 years of divided European history and memory. The scope of the Programme must be expanded by calling the totalitarian regimes and their crimes by their right names - Communism and National Socialism - and removing the strictures that limit them articficially to their worst forms of expression and time periods. Their legacies haunt European social memories still today and must be overcome lest they overcome us.