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Learning from outside the EU - What are other international organisations doing in the Social Economy Area?

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Presentation by Antonella Noya, Senior Policy Analyst, OECD, on the occasion of the EESC conference on "Social economy and social innovation as drivers of competitiveness, growth and social well-being - Perspecitves and priorities for the new Commission and the European Parliament" (Brussels, 1 October 2014)

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Learning from outside the EU - What are other international organisations doing in the Social Economy Area?

  1. 1. “PERSPECTIVE AND PRIORITIES FOR THE NEW COMMISSION AND THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT : SOCIAL ECONOMY AND SOCIAL INNOVATION AS DRIVERS OF COMPETITIVNESS, GROWHT AND SOCIAL WELL BEING” LEARNING FROM OUTSIDE THE EU – WHAT ARE OTHER INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS DOING IN THE SOCIAL ECONOMY AREA? Antonella Noya, Senior Policy Analyst and Manager of the Forum on Social Innovations, OCDE EESC 1st October 2014 Brussels
  2. 2. OECD raising policy awareness and visibility of the social economy and social entrepreneurship: why • Reconciling economy and society » and « building a plural economy » : that is re-embedding the economy in the society as a policy strategy to foster inclusive and sustainable economic development • Since the late 90s analysis of the contribution of the SEOs and the SE to the local economic development: 1. creation of economic, social ( and environmental) value 2. production of tangible goods and services to meet unmet needs AND to respond to new opportunities in tailored and often innovative ways ( not a residual role but a partner in the economic development) 3. and of intanglible assets ( social cohesion, social well being, communities ties, social capital, increased democratic participation)
  3. 3. OECD: raising policy awareness and visibility of the social economy and social entrepreneurship: how • Since mid 90s the social economy and the social entrepreneurship embedded in the OECD POW, endorsed by OECD member countries • Since 2000 a dedicated Forum on social innovations http:// www.oecd.org/cfe/leed/Forum-Social-Innovations.htm • Main tools and outputs: A number of reports, publications, conferences, seminars, capacity building seminars, country reviews • Last year the OECD joined the UN inter-agency task force on social and solidarity economy • A dedicated cooperation with the EC on social entrepreneurship: in depth reviews, policy briefs, CBS, compendium.
  4. 4. Why public policies should support social economy and social entrepreneurship ? • Policies are needed to help SEOs and SE to overcome barriers • SE bring SOCIAL ADDED VALUE : their raison d’être is to address social, economic and environmental challenges • they foster inclusive growth and increase social inclusion, while pursuing the general interest and benefitting the communities as explicit mission. • Supporting SE creation and development allow public policies to better meet employment, social and economic challenges while better spending public money, as some evaluations show.this results in ECONOMIC VALUE
  5. 5. Conducive policy ecosystems for social enterprises
  6. 6. Legal and regulatory frameworks • Legal and regulatory frameworks bring clarity by defining SE, its mission and activites and help to open up opportunities for the provision of forms of support and access to market and capitals. Policy makers and investors need clarity • In countries where no appropriate legal framework is in place, social enterprises may struggle to have their dual bottom line recognised and find themselves subject to legal and regulatory frameworks that are inappropriate. • Although an appropriate legal framework is needed, it is important to carefully evaluate whether new legislation is needed or the adaptation of the existing framework can be a better solution.
  7. 7. • SEs are financed by a combination of financial resources ( market, non market, non monetary) • Financing from Governments might be required in the short and medium terms to help sustainability and following the SE life cycle • Evolving landscape for social enterprises finances • Range of different financing tools needed: – Debt, equity and quasi-equity instruments, patient capital • Government can contribute through: – Credit guarantees – Fiscal incentives for investors – Partnerships with social finance intermediaries and investors 7 Access to capital
  8. 8. 8 Access to markets
  9. 9. Business support structures • Social enterprises, like conventional enterprises, benefit from the existence of integrated support strategies and structures. Social enterprises have specific features which create complex needs demanding diversified solutions • A ‘braided’ system of support, which includes both generic business and specialist social enterprise components, could be an interesting model to be developed (Daniele et al., 2009). • Hubs and incubators need to be spread and supported
  10. 10. Training and research • Social enterprise workers and managers need appropriate training and skills provision if quality jobs are to be created • Research contributes to the identification and articulation of social economy needs, functions and potential : importance of co -constructed knowledge 10
  11. 11. Policy co-construction: cooperation and coordination Working horizontally across silos Working vertically across levels of government Participation of relevant stakeholders Reduction in information asymmetries Reduction in transaction costs Greater policy coherence and effectivness!
  12. 12. A coherent policy ecosystem for social entrepreneurship NATIONAL GOVERNMENT Multi-stakeholder SOU International Network Social Economy Actors and Stakeholders SUPRA-NATIONAL Cluster of Institutions (i.e. EU) Horizontal Spaces REGIONAL GOVERNMENT Horizontal Multi-stakeholder Spaces LOCAL GOVERNMENT Horizontal Multi-stakeholder Spaces Intermediaries SSE / SE C o - C o ns t r u ct i on C o or di n at i o n Source: Mendell, M (2010) “Improving social inclusion at the local level through the social economy: Designing an enabling policy framework” OECD Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Working Papers, OECD Publishing
  13. 13. THANK YOU! • For further information on OECD work on social economy and social entrepreneurship: Antonella Noya: antonella.noya@oecd.org 14

Presentation by Antonella Noya, Senior Policy Analyst, OECD, on the occasion of the EESC conference on "Social economy and social innovation as drivers of competitiveness, growth and social well-being - Perspecitves and priorities for the new Commission and the European Parliament" (Brussels, 1 October 2014)

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