Kingdoms (Animals) - Block 5

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Kingdoms (Animals) - Block 5

  1. 1. Echinoderms<br />
  2. 2. Echinoderms<br />Phylum Echinodermata<br />Endoskeleton<br />Tube feet. <br />Radial symmetry<br />
  3. 3. Form and Function<br />Water vascular system<br />Madreporite<br />
  4. 4. Feeding<br />Sea urchins<br />Sea lilies<br />Sea cucumbers<br />Sea stars<br />
  5. 5. Respiration and Circulation<br />Water vascular system<br />Diffusion across the tissue of tube feet<br />Skin gills<br />
  6. 6. Excretion<br />Anus<br />Tube feet<br />
  7. 7. Response and Movement<br />Nerve ring and Radial Nerves<br />Sensory Cells<br />Movement is through the tube feet<br />Sand dollars and sea urchins<br />Sea and brittle stars<br />Sea cucumbers<br />
  8. 8. Reproduction<br />External fertilization<br />Separate sexes<br />Bilateral symmetry<br />
  9. 9. Sea Urchins and Sand Dollars<br />Class Echinoidea<br /> Have a large, solid plate that forms a box around their internal organs<br />Detritivores or grazers that eat algae<br />Some have large sharp spines<br />
  10. 10. Brittle Stars<br />Class Ophiuroidea<br />Slender, flexible arms and can scuttle around quite rapidly<br /> Can shed one or more arms when attacked. The arms will keep moving to distract the predator<br /> Filter feeders and detritivores that hide by day<br />
  11. 11. Sea Cucumbers<br />Class Holothuroidea<br />Detritus feeders<br />Evisceration<br />
  12. 12. Sea Stars<br />Class Asteroidea<br />Carnivorous<br />As long as it contains a <br />portion of the central part <br />of the body, pieces of sea stars can repair itself into a <br />new animal<br />
  13. 13. Sea Lilies and Feather Stars<br />Class Crinoidea<br />Filter feeders<br />Sessile<br />
  14. 14. Ecology<br />Sea urchins<br />Sea stars<br />Crown-of-thorns<br />
  15. 15. Invertebrate Evolution<br />
  16. 16. Molecular Paleontology<br />Microscopic fossils have been preserved that show the embryos of early multicellular animals<br /> Molecular paleontology<br />
  17. 17. The First Multicellular Animals<br />Ediacaran fossils<br />They were flat and plate-shaped<br />Soft tissues<br />Segmented bodies and bilateral symmetry<br />
  18. 18. Vertebrate Diversity<br />Cambrian Period (554 mya)<br />This is when the <br />ancestors of most <br />modern animal phyla <br />first appear in the fossil <br />record<br />
  19. 19. Phylogeny<br />Chordates<br />Arthropods<br />Echinoderms<br />Mollusks<br />Radial symmetry<br />Annelids<br />Roundworms<br />Flatworms<br />Cnidarians<br />Pseudo-coelom<br />Deuterostome Development<br />Radial symmetry<br />Sponges<br />Coelom<br />Protostome development<br />Tissues<br />Three Germ layers; bilateral symmetry<br />Multi-cellularity<br />Single-cell ancestor<br />
  20. 20. Invertebrate Comparison<br />
  21. 21. Invertebrate Comparison, pt 2<br />
  22. 22. Feeding and Digestion<br />The simplest animals break down food primarily through intracellular digestion, but more complex animals use extracellular<br />
  23. 23. Aquatic Respiration<br />
  24. 24. Terrestrial Respiration<br />
  25. 25. Circulation<br />
  26. 26. Excretion<br />
  27. 27. Response<br />
  28. 28. Skeletons<br />
  29. 29. Reproduction<br />

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