Expanding ACCESS to       International Students21st Annual Strategic Enrollment Management Conference: The Origin        ...
AgendaI. ContextII. RelevanceIII. Project ConceptualizationIV. Program ImplementationV. Lessons LearnedVI. Discussion     ...
CONTEXT          Where Innovation Is Tradition
InternationalizationDefined “... as the process of integrating an  international perspective into a college or university ...
Institutional Profile•   Public institution located in Fairfax, VA•   Founded in 1972•   Three campuses (distributed model...
Institutional Culture•   Students enrolled from over 136 nations•   10+ offices actively engaged in internationalization-r...
Institutional PrioritizationInternational/Global foci are specifically  included in institutional strategic plan:  “The Un...
RELEVANCE       Where Innovation Is Tradition
Why Grow International Enrollments?One element of campus internationalization efforts:• Increase campus diversity• Moral: ...
Discussion ExerciseQuestions                          Responses Main Categories• What kind of issues do           • Accult...
Options ExploredPossibilities:                 Selected Approach• External: Outsourcing        • Internal – New• Internal:...
PROJECTCONCEPTUALIZATION       Where Innovation Is Tradition
ACCESS Program• International Freshmen• Alternative Admission Requirements  • Meets academic qualifications  • Lower Engli...
Organizational Structure • Established “Center for International Student   Access” in Fall 2010; located in Office of Prov...
Organizational Structure (continued)    – Special Programs (e.g., Honors College, MSU)  • Resource Sharing    – “Initiativ...
Enrollment Strategies• Vision for Enrollment  • Attracting     From where, at what cost, how many?  • Enrolling     Allian...
Pilot Program Design• Multi-pronged research informed approach  •   First-year Experience  •   International Programs & Ou...
Pilot Program Structure - AcademicsFall Course Sequence                 Spring Course Sequence• Enhanced English Comp I (3...
Pilot Program Structure –Co- & Extra- CurricularComplementary Programming         Co-curricular Programming  •   Peer Ment...
LESSONS LEARNED       Where Innovation Is Tradition
Pilot Year Evaluation • Program Needs    – Achieving appropriate balance of human resources    – Securing needed space/hou...
Structural Adjustments•   Internal buy-in/marketing•   Adjusting Revenue model•   Marketing & recruitment strategies•   Pe...
Results - Assessment• Increased enrollment in second year• Exceeded pilot year retention target• Positive Stakeholder feed...
Results – Enrollment DataPilot Year                           Second Year• 21 students from 8 nations         • 57 Student...
Results - Momentum  • Development of research    initiatives  • Development of new    partnerships  • Elements modeled by ...
Future Implications•   How big does this program need to be?•   How do we work with potential partners?•   How do we effec...
Daniel Robb             Nicole Sealey               drobb@gmu.edu           nsealey@gmu.eduYou can access this presentatio...
ReferencesACCESS Program website. George Mason University’s Center for    International Student Access - http://cisa.gmu.e...
References (continued)Fischer, K. (May 29, 2011). Colleges Adapt to New Kinds of Students From   Abroad: Younger, sometime...
References (continued)Hill, B. A. (2008). A Guide To Internationalization For Chief Academic    Officers. American Council...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

SEM 2011 Expanding ACCESS to International Students

672 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
672
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
141
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • INTROAsk audience to introduce themselves. Intro ourselves and our presentation approach.
  • Dan?
  • NICOLE:You can’t talk about internationalization without discussing Jane Knight (1993) whose basic definition of internationalization is often cited as: “the process for integrating international/intercultural content into the teaching, learning, research and service functions of the institution.” However, a more exciting definition comes from the American Council of Education for CAOs [read quote].
  • Dan
  • Nicole
  • Dan
  • Dan
  • NICOLE:Steps: Invite people to discuss with those around them and come up with a short list of five answers to the question. Call out and make a list.Response:Programs for other special populations exist where student needs aren’t met with current resources (e.g., athletics, underprepared, first-generation). Why not international students? They can get ‘lost’ in the mix of the institution.
  • Dan
  • Nicole
  • Nicole
  • Dan
  • Nicole
  • NICOLE (2 minutes)Extra & co-curricular endeavors& contributions to university efforts at internationalization
  • Joint
  • We have an unusual mix based on our backgroundCultural diversity is paramountDiluted population due to area
  • DanNicole to add a few thingsStart smallThink it throughInternational students have needs; are you prepared to help them?
  • SEM 2011 Expanding ACCESS to International Students

    1. 1. Expanding ACCESS to International Students21st Annual Strategic Enrollment Management Conference: The Origin and Future of SEM San Diego, California Tuesday, November 1, 2011 ● 11:00 am - 12:30 pm Daniel Robb, Assistant Vice President, Enrollment Development/Associate Dean, Admissions Nicole J. Sealey, Director, Center for International Student Access Where Innovation Is Tradition
    2. 2. AgendaI. ContextII. RelevanceIII. Project ConceptualizationIV. Program ImplementationV. Lessons LearnedVI. Discussion Where Innovation Is Tradition
    3. 3. CONTEXT Where Innovation Is Tradition
    4. 4. InternationalizationDefined “... as the process of integrating an international perspective into a college or university system. It is an ongoing, future-oriented, multidimensional, interdisciplinary, leadership- driven vision that involves many stakeholders working to change the internal dynamics of an institution to respond and adapt appropriately to an increasingly diverse, globally focused, ever-changing external environment” (Ellingboe, 1998, p. 199). Where Innovation Is Tradition
    5. 5. Institutional Profile• Public institution located in Fairfax, VA• Founded in 1972• Three campuses (distributed model) & several sites• Enrollments upwards of 32,000• International enrollment averaging 6%• Location close to Washington, DC Metro area Where Innovation Is Tradition
    6. 6. Institutional Culture• Students enrolled from over 136 nations• 10+ offices actively engaged in internationalization-related efforts• 28 International/Multicultural Student Organizations• 30+ different “global” academic programs (11 UG degrees, 20 UG minors)• Mason freshman desired to “improve their understanding of other countries and cultures… and help to promote racial understanding” at higher rates than public university counter parts (2003, 2005 CIRP data) Where Innovation Is Tradition
    7. 7. Institutional PrioritizationInternational/Global foci are specifically included in institutional strategic plan: “The University will develop more fully its leading role as a global university, through diverse international partnerships and the extension of global and environmental awareness in all educational programs.” ―A goal from Mason’s 2014 Strategic Plan Where Innovation Is Tradition
    8. 8. RELEVANCE Where Innovation Is Tradition
    9. 9. Why Grow International Enrollments?One element of campus internationalization efforts:• Increase campus diversity• Moral: Feeling that “it’s the right thing to do”• Increase tuition revenues• Increase international profile “This is a special moment in American recruitment and treatment ofinternational students, with interest still high but competition rising” -Peter Stearns, Provost Where Innovation Is Tradition
    10. 10. Discussion ExerciseQuestions Responses Main Categories• What kind of issues do • Acculturation international students have at your institution(s)? • Social• What are the barriers to • Linguistic admission, retention, and graduation for international students? Where Innovation Is Tradition
    11. 11. Options ExploredPossibilities: Selected Approach• External: Outsourcing • Internal – New• Internal: Utilizing • Logic: internal resources • Retain high level of• Internal – New: control and work with our students directly Creation of New • Utilize plentiful existing Structure resources without overtaxing them Where Innovation Is Tradition
    12. 12. PROJECTCONCEPTUALIZATION Where Innovation Is Tradition
    13. 13. ACCESS Program• International Freshmen• Alternative Admission Requirements • Meets academic qualifications • Lower English Proficiency threshold • Provisional admission• Goal: One year comprehensive first-year experience Where Innovation Is Tradition
    14. 14. Organizational Structure • Established “Center for International Student Access” in Fall 2010; located in Office of Provost • Connected to Institutional Infrastructure: – English Language Institute – Enrollment Management-affiliated Offices (e.g., Admissions, Registrar) – Academic units – University Life (e.g., Student Involvement, Immigration Services) Where Innovation Is Tradition
    15. 15. Organizational Structure (continued) – Special Programs (e.g., Honors College, MSU) • Resource Sharing – “Initiative-based” budget model • Set aside • Some of net revenues were reallocated to support specific internationalization efforts • Self-sustaining – Out of state tuition rates + flat‐rate premium costs – Short seminars set up as 0 credit courses, costing between $60‐250 each Where Innovation Is Tradition
    16. 16. Enrollment Strategies• Vision for Enrollment • Attracting From where, at what cost, how many? • Enrolling Alliances, embassies, differences in yield • Retaining What services and at what cost? Where Innovation Is Tradition
    17. 17. Pilot Program Design• Multi-pronged research informed approach • First-year Experience • International Programs & Outreach • Academic Advising for “At-risk students” • Multicultural Education – Acculturation – Language Acquisition and Development – Student Success Skills – Counseling & Support – Community Engagement Where Innovation Is Tradition
    18. 18. Pilot Program Structure - AcademicsFall Course Sequence Spring Course Sequence• Enhanced English Comp I (3) • Enhanced English Comp II (3)• Public Speaking (3) • Anthropology (3)• Language Support for Public • Research Methods (3) Speaking (1) • Mathematics (3)• World History (3) • Major Course (3)• Language Support for Public Speaking (1) Summer Courses (if needed)• Freshman Seminar (1) • Modern English Grammar (3) Where Innovation Is Tradition
    19. 19. Pilot Program Structure –Co- & Extra- CurricularComplementary Programming Co-curricular Programming • Peer Mentorship Academic Support Program • Advising & Acculturation • Peer Learning • Academic Success Partnership Program Workshops • Tutoring • Student Leadership Council Student Activities • Fall Themes: • “Alumni” Program Academic/Acculturation • Spring Themes: Community & Self-directed Success Where Innovation Is Tradition
    20. 20. LESSONS LEARNED Where Innovation Is Tradition
    21. 21. Pilot Year Evaluation • Program Needs – Achieving appropriate balance of human resources – Securing needed space/housing requirements – Obtaining uninhibited access to qualified faculty resources – Fully developed enrollment funnel model for recruitment, retention, and graduation through program assessment & environmental analyses • Institutional Prioritization • Consensus Building Where Innovation Is Tradition
    22. 22. Structural Adjustments• Internal buy-in/marketing• Adjusting Revenue model• Marketing & recruitment strategies• Personnel  Qualified faculty  Qualified staff Where Innovation Is Tradition
    23. 23. Results - Assessment• Increased enrollment in second year• Exceeded pilot year retention target• Positive Stakeholder feedback  Students  Faculty  Staff• Increasing institutional support Where Innovation Is Tradition
    24. 24. Results – Enrollment DataPilot Year Second Year• 21 students from 8 nations • 57 Students from 14 nations• Average Student: • Average Student: • Male (76%) • Male (78%) • Saudi Arabian (61%) • Saudi Arabian (42%) • Attended university ELI • Attended university ELI (76%) (49%)• Retention to sophomore • Retention to sophomore year: 71% year: TBA Where Innovation Is Tradition
    25. 25. Results - Momentum • Development of research initiatives • Development of new partnerships • Elements modeled by other programs as a “best practice”Where Innovation Is Tradition
    26. 26. Future Implications• How big does this program need to be?• How do we work with potential partners?• How do we effectively share the model?• How nimble are we in adjusting each year?• Do we need to control costs and max revenues?• How do we develop metrics to best “tell the story”?• How can we leverage lessons increase benefits to more members at the institution? Where Innovation Is Tradition
    27. 27. Daniel Robb Nicole Sealey drobb@gmu.edu nsealey@gmu.eduYou can access this presentation online at:http://cisa.gmu.edu/2011/10/aacrao-sem-2011DISCUSSION Where Innovation Is Tradition
    28. 28. ReferencesACCESS Program website. George Mason University’s Center for International Student Access - http://cisa.gmu.edu/programs/access/.Davis, R., Mallett, K., Sealey, N. & Zgheib, G. 2011. “Expanding ACCESS to International Students.” Presentation at 3rd Annual Colonial Academic Alliance Global Education Conference. Fairfax, VA.Ellingboe, B.J. (1998). Divisional strategies to internationalize a campus portrait: Results, resistance, and recommendations from a case study at a U.S. university, in Mestenhauser, J.A. and Elllingboe, B.J (eds.), Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum: Internationalizing the Campus. Phoenix, AZ: American Council on Education and Oryx Press, pp. 198-228. Where Innovation Is Tradition
    29. 29. References (continued)Fischer, K. (May 29, 2011). Colleges Adapt to New Kinds of Students From Abroad: Younger, sometimes less-experienced students require more academic and social support. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Educate-a-New- Kind-of/127704/Fischer, K. (August 7, 2011). College 101 for Non-Native Speakers: Pathways programs blend English and academics to help foreign students succeed. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/College-101-for-International/128535/Habib, A. S. and Mallett, K. E. (eds.). 2011. “Diversity at Mason: The pursuit of transformative education.” Fairfax, VA: Diversity Research Group, George Mason University. Where Innovation Is Tradition
    30. 30. References (continued)Hill, B. A. (2008). A Guide To Internationalization For Chief Academic Officers. American Council on Education.International Association of Universities. 2010. Internationalization of Higher Education: Global Trends, Regional Perspectives. IAU 3rd Global Survey. Paris: UNESCO House. Where Innovation Is Tradition

    ×