2-03 Session slides

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  • Point out how much time is spent in meetings - often unproductive
  • Session objectives
  • Cyclical approach, using a range of new techniques to explore some learning about effective
  • First problem, using the first technique… Problem 1… When and where to use icebreakers Technique 1… Progressive charting
  • Five minutes at table 1 Three minutes at table 2 and table 3 Divide delegates into three groups – A, B and C – See slide for allocating tasks. When groups move on, ask them to read what has already been written, and add any new points
  • Feedback on icebreakers… each group to pick three IMPORTANT things from the finished charts Feedback on technique… Each group write down one situation where you WOULD use that technique and one where you would not Keep the PROBLEM (icebreakers) feedback separate from the TECHNIQUE (progressive charting) feedback. Draw out some key learning points about when, where and how to use
  • Problem 2… ground rules Technique 2… Idea collecting – 2 approaches Phase 1 – collecting ideas 10 mins Phase 2 – the final contract 5 mins Ground rules also known as.. Group contract/playground rules/ team contract
  • Divide delegates into two groups – A and B, to contrast the two techniques
  • Feedback from groups Give the groups three minutes to decide on the two sentences you would like to feed back from that exercise - one about the Problem, one about the Technique. Draw out some key learning points about when, where and how to use ground rules. Take some selected feedback about the technique. Identify differences between the ‘post-it’ and ‘flipchart’ approaches.
  • INPUT – Creative thinking How many people think they are creative? (usually only small proportion of audience) Show NASA test results… following slides 12 -1 9 build up the picture.
  • Longitudinal study of the same population of 1600 people, using the same test that NASA uses to recruit creative engineers. The slides gradually complete the table. Get delegates to guess the figures before revealing them.
  • Final line is a broader study of 200,000 people over 25.
  • Conclusion – we are all born creative, but we lose the ability through education/societal pressure. We can all regain this ability.
  • Edward de Bono identifies the concept of ‘mental valleys’ – over the years we develop streams of thinking which carve out mental valleys. To think creatively we need to break out of these valleys – maybe to leap from one to the other. Good example = think about access to primary care – we immediately have a mental picture of a GP surgery – waiting room, consulting rooms, posters on the walls, receptionists etc. e.g. think about how we might redesign primary care from the ‘mental valley’ of a supermarket, or a sports stadium, or a bank…
  • One approach to helping us to escape from these mental valleys has been developed by Paul Plesk – called the Directed Creativity approach. Suggests we nee Attention, Escape, and Movement to be creative.
  • Another technique to escape the mental valleys… The Creative Problem Solving Process Divergent and convergent thinking Divergent thinking… generating ideas, possibilities, new thinking Principles and Rules for brainstorming (for all divergent thinking)
  • One of the best known techniques for divergent thinking is Brainstorming. This is not brilliant at removing you from mental valleys – but it helps. The most useful aspect we can learn from this technique is the Principles and Rules – these should apply to ALL divergent thinking. We will remind you of these guidelines during the next few exercises. Defer judgement – no comments about the quality or applicability of an ideas during the divergent phase. Judgement stops creativity! Quantity breeds quality – if you want to get a good idea the best way is to have lots of ideas and then discard the bad ones!
  • Applying Divergent and Convergent thinking Technique 3 – Reverse Brainstorming Problem 3 – Contributing to meetings
  • Reverse brainstorming forces you out of the mental valley by making you look at the ‘other end’ of the problem! NB Read the brief out carefully… people may be surprised by the wording!
  • Explain process, remind of brainstorming rules and principles Leave Rules and Principles slide showing whilst brainstorming for 10 minutes
  • Move straight on to Technique 4 – Top 3 Explain process, allow 10 minutes
  • Feedback … from task… Top 3 Tips for contributing to meetings Feedback.. from process (personal planning) Reminder – keep TECHNIQUE feedback separate from the PROBLEM feedback
  • … and finally, now really warmed up, we’ll look at another divergent thinking technique, using the work of Paul Plsek and Edward de Bono. One way to get out of a mental valley is to ‘jump’ to somewhere else, and then find your way back to the problem from there. We are going to take you to the far right side of your brain… and use pictures to stimulate your thinking. Exercise Technique 5 – Picture provocations Problem 4 – Leading and facilitating meetings Explain process, remind of brainstorming rules and principles Leave Rules and Principles slide showing whilst working for 10 mins
  • Ensure that the pictures are being stuck to the flipcharts, with legible and reasonably understandable captions – people from other groups will need to read and understand these in the next activity.
  • Leave Rules and Principles slide showing whilst working for 10 mins
  • Move straight on to… Technique 6 – Coloured dots
  • Explain, walk around room (5 mins)
  • Feedback…what comes out top on your chart? Process? How can we use this? Take feedback swiftly about the leadership issues. Spend a little more time talking about possible applications of picture provocations (are people inspired to try other divergent thinking techniques?) and coloured dots (any new ideas
  • Final quick session on making meetings run more smoothly…
  • Questions to ask before planning and organising a meeting Practical equipment for creative meetings If time allows, get participants to offer suggestions for these issues Some suggestions for handling cynics
  • Facilitation is coping with uncertain situations!! Process tools Enthusiasm Flexibility / adaptability Objectivity Be open minded
  • Are they trouble makers Or do they just see the world in a different way? ASSUMPTION - never make any!!! Makes an ass of u and me!!
  • Just a bit of fun to finish with Check that the video is working before you run this session! If not, add in your own slide to wrap up.
  • 2-03 Session slides

    1. 1. Meetings and facilitation skills Insert name of presenter
    2. 2. Some facts about meetings… <ul><li>CEOs – 17 hours per week </li></ul><ul><li>Senior managers – 23 hours per week </li></ul><ul><li>Middle managers – 11 hours per week </li></ul><ul><li>Senior and middle managers say only 56% of meetings are productive </li></ul><ul><li>Wharton Centre for Applied Research </li></ul>
    3. 3. Aims of session <ul><li>To improve your skills for facilitating, chairing and attending meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>To explore some principles of working with large and small groups. </li></ul><ul><li>To learn some skills, tools and techniques for a more creative approach to solving problems </li></ul>
    4. 4. How we’ll do it… Some problems to solve… Some solutions identified… Some new ideas to take away… Some techniques to test…
    5. 5. Problem 1 <ul><li>When, where, how and why to use icebreaker exercises effectively </li></ul>Technique 1 <ul><li>Progressive charting </li></ul>
    6. 6. Progressive charting - method <ul><li>‘ A’ tables - When would you use an ice breaker? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ B’ tables - What are the potential benefits of using ice breakers? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ C’ tables - What are the worst things about ice breakers? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Take your pen with you…and move on. A to B, B to C, C to A. Add new ideas to the list. </li></ul><ul><li>Then move on again. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Feedback <ul><li>Feedback on icebreakers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each group to pick three IMPORTANT things from the finished charts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feedback on progressive charting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each group describe one situation where you WOULD use that technique and one where you would NOT. </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Problem 2 <ul><li>Setting the ground rules for teams and groups to work together effectively </li></ul>Technique 2 <ul><li>Idea collection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using post-it notes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using the flip chart </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Idea collection - method <ul><li>Identify a facilitator </li></ul><ul><li>In pairs – discuss what you need to feel safe and productive in this group </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ A’ groups – put each issue on a separate post it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ B’ groups – write the ideas on a flipchart </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The facilitator gathers these comments to compile a final flip chart with the agreed ‘group contract’ </li></ul>
    10. 10. Feedback <ul><li>Three minutes to give me: </li></ul><ul><li>One sentence on the problem (what have you learned about ice breakers ) </li></ul><ul><li>One sentence on the technique (what have you learned about idea collection – either method) </li></ul>
    11. 11. Slight pause for thought… Let’s think about being a bit more creative….
    12. 12. Scores in NASA creativity test 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    13. 13. Scores in NASA creativity test 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    14. 14. Scores in NASA creativity test same group 10 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    15. 15. Scores in NASA creativity test 30 same group 10 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    16. 16. Scores in NASA creativity test same group 15 30 same group 10 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    17. 17. Scores in NASA creativity test 12 same group 15 30 same group 10 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    18. 18. Scores in NASA creativity test 200,000 >25 12 same group 15 30 same group 10 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    19. 19. Scores in NASA creativity test 2 200,000 >25 12 same group 15 30 same group 10 98 1600 5 % “highly creative” No. tested Age
    20. 20. Self-Organizing Systems deBono’s River & Topology Analogy for Thinking Streams of thinking Valleys
    21. 21. Three principles behind all tools of DirectedCreativity Attention Escape Movement Paul Plesk
    22. 22. Creative Problem Solving… 1 Mess finding 2 Data finding 3 Problem finding 4 Idea finding 5 Solution finding 6 Acceptance finding We need both divergent and convergent thinking…
    23. 23. Brainstorming <ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defer judgement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantity breeds quality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rules of brainstorming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Criticism is ruled out </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freewheeling is recommended </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantity is wanted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combine and improve (hitchhike) </li></ul></ul>Rules for all divergent thinking!
    24. 24. Problem 3 <ul><li>Contributing effectively to meetings </li></ul>Technique 3 <ul><li>Reverse brainstorming (divergent thinking) </li></ul>
    25. 25. Reverse brainstorming - method <ul><li>Use the principles and rules of brainstorming to address this problem: </li></ul>You are have been invited to attend a Process Mapping event What could you do during the meeting to ensure that other members of the group are as unwilling as possible to participate in the session?
    26. 26. Brainstorming <ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defer judgement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantity breeds quality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rules of brainstorming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Criticism is ruled out </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freewheeling is recommended </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantity is wanted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combine and improve (hitchhike) </li></ul></ul>Rules for all divergent thinking!
    27. 27. … and now…convergent thinking! (Technique 4 – Top three) <ul><li>Look at all of the ideas you have generated in the reverse brainstorm </li></ul><ul><li>Pick the three that you think will have the most impact on making the meeting really bad </li></ul><ul><li>Turn these around into practical suggestions to make your contributions to meetings more effective </li></ul>
    28. 28. Feedback <ul><li>What was the best thing about that exercise? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you apply that to your work? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the worst thing? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you learn from this/avoid it when working with groups? </li></ul>
    29. 29. Problem 4 <ul><li>Leading meetings effectively </li></ul>Technique 5 <ul><li>Picture provocations (divergent thinking) </li></ul>
    30. 30. Picture provocations - method <ul><li>Look at the selection of pictures you have in front of you </li></ul><ul><li>Remember the principles and rules for divergent thinking… and get out of the mental valleys </li></ul><ul><li>Use the pictures to provoke ideas about the skills, talents, style, approaches, techniques that make for effective leadership of meetings </li></ul>
    31. 31. Brainstorming <ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defer judgement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantity breeds quality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rules of brainstorming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Criticism is ruled out </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freewheeling is recommended </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantity is wanted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combine and improve (hitchhike) </li></ul></ul>Rules for all divergent thinking!
    32. 32. Technique 6 <ul><li>Coloured dots </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(convergent thinking) </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Coloured dots - method <ul><li>Take five dots each (any colour) </li></ul><ul><li>Walk around the flipcharts and award your dots to your favourite ideas (ie those you are most likely to use) </li></ul><ul><li>You may award between one and five dots to any idea, but use up all five dots </li></ul>
    34. 34. Feedback <ul><li>On leading teams … which idea has the highest number of votes on your chart? </li></ul><ul><li>On Picture Provocations and Coloured Dots … when could you use these techniques? </li></ul>
    35. 35. Variations on coloured dots… <ul><li>All doctors have one colour, nurses another, managers another etc </li></ul><ul><li>Only one vote per idea </li></ul><ul><li>One colour for a positive vote, one for a negative </li></ul><ul><li>… and so on </li></ul>
    36. 36. Planning and preparation
    37. 37. Planning checklist <ul><li>Who are the stakeholders in the design of the meeting? </li></ul><ul><li>What do they want out of the session? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the profile of the group? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you sharing the facilitation? Who with? </li></ul><ul><li>Time available? </li></ul><ul><li>Venue details </li></ul><ul><li>Who is recording? </li></ul><ul><li>Action points and success criteria </li></ul><ul><li>What tools will you need? </li></ul>
    38. 38. Top Tips for Tools of the trade <ul><li>Flip chart paper (and stand!!) </li></ul><ul><li>Flip chart pens (different colours) </li></ul><ul><li>Felt pens (for writing on to post – its) </li></ul><ul><li>Post – its (different sizes and colours) </li></ul><ul><li>Coloured dots </li></ul><ul><li>Blu Tack </li></ul><ul><li>Time – things always take longer than you think !!!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Process Tools </li></ul><ul><li>What else? </li></ul>
    39. 39. Managing a session <ul><li>You’re running out of time? </li></ul><ul><li>Unclear objectives? </li></ul><ul><li>People aren’t listening? </li></ul><ul><li>Domination by one person? </li></ul><ul><li>Someone not contributing? </li></ul><ul><li>You’ve forgotten where you are and what comes next! </li></ul>
    40. 40. CYNICS? <ul><li>Be open to what everyone says </li></ul><ul><li>ACCEPT IT – there is probably a good reason for their views </li></ul><ul><li>Build the bridge </li></ul>FACILITATOR’S ASSUMPTION: People are doing the best they can with the experience, resources and tools they have
    41. 41. And finally – always be prepared for the unexpected!

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