SlideShare a Scribd company logo
CLIMATE
DIALOGUE
WINONA
COUNTY
MARCH 2016
2
RURAL
CLIMATE
DIALOGUES
Rural communities are at-risk to be seriously affected by both the direct impacts of a changing climate
(e.g. extreme weather) and by efforts to mitigate those changes. This is especially true in considering
solutions and policies that increase energy, resource, or transportation costs.
At the same time, much of the “production” in climate-sensitive economies will occur in rural areas,
including through renewable energy deployment, reinvigorated local and regional food economies, and
changes to land use patterns. Rural communities will and must play an integral role in addressing climate
issues.
Despite this significance, rural communities have often been overlooked in climate conversations;
political debate and policy changes have tended to emphasize urban and suburban perspectives. In many
communities, incomplete information and limited public participation have prevented sound, publicly-
supported policy from emerging.
But it doesn’t have to stay this way.
Rural residents and communities can develop innovative solutions that respond to local and regional
challenges to remain vibrant and prosperous. Recent research has shown that 85 percent of rural
Minnesotans feel that people like themselves can make an impact and improve local quality of life; 75
percent believe their community can work together across differences.
Drawing on this resilient attitude, rural communities – in conjunction with the Jefferson Center and the
Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy – are seeking to move conversations on climate change forward.
Climate Dialogues help rural communities think critically and plan strategically to address local challenges
related to weather and climate. To foster high-quality engagement, we use the time-tested Citizens
Jury method for community problem solving and leadership development. This approach—which brings
together a microcosm of the community to study an issue in-depth and generate a shared community
response—has consistently provided a productive, educational, and inclusive way to address complex,
divisive challenges.
The Winona County Climate Dialogue is the third in a series of projects aimed at galvanizing rural citizens
to assert leadership and build resiliency in the face of extreme weather and changing climate conditions.
This Dialogue brought together a randomly selected but demographically balanced group of 18 citizens
from Winona County in an intense, three-day moderated study and deliberation forum. They were
tasked with creating a shared, community-based response to changing weather conditions and extreme
weather events. Beyond that charge, the group was completely citizen-driven— no one told them what
to do or what to think. The panel had the liberty, information, and resources to produce their own
recommendations that respond to community needs, priorities, concerns, and values in order to maintain
and strengthen the resilience and prosperity of Winona County. These recommendations will serve as a
starting point for community conversations on extreme weather and climate.
The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, along with our local partners,
will work to widely publicize the event and engage panelists and community members inspired by the
conversation to work on these issues as local leaders. We’ll continue to support the community as they
work to implement citizen recommendations.
The Rural Climate Dialogues help develop and amplify an informed voice of the people so that regional,
state, and national policymakers can take their needs into account when developing climate policy.
Through the expansion of this project, we hope to build better climate change policy and stronger, civic-
minded communities across rural Minnesota.
3
DIALOGUE PROCESS
DAY 1
»» Panelists meet one another and discuss goals and expectations for the 3
days
»» Panelists engage in a simulation exercise as an introduction to the process
of assessing information and working together to achieve shared results
»» Panelists determine how to develop clear and useful information for
sharing with their neighbors
»» Presentation on local extreme weather and climate conditions by Mark
Seeley (University of Minnesota Extension)
»» Presentation by Lynn Hinkle (MnSEIA) and Chris Meyer (SE CERTs) on
energy
DAY 2
»» Presentation by Jennifer Biederman (Winona State University) and Josh Eash
(Fish & Wildlife Service) on water resources
»» Presentation by Mark Kulda (Insurance Federation of Minnesota) on insurance
»» Presentation by Bruce Snyder (University of Minnesota) on public health
»» Presentation by Jake Overgaard (UMN Extension) on agriculture
DAY 3
»» Panelists identify and select top challenges
»» Panelists identify and select top opportunities
»» Panelists provide important evidence for each challenge and opportunity
»» Panelists identify top actions
»» Panelists write final statement in group editing process
Eighteen Winona County citizens met at the Winona State University Tau Center
in Winona, Minnesota for 3 days, 8:30am to 5:00pm, starting Thursday, March
3rd and concluding Saturday, March 5th. Participants were randomly selected
and stratified to include a balanced representation of the Winona County
population. Participants were paid $375 plus expenses for the three days.
The group was tasked with deciding how Winona County might best address
extreme weather and a changing climate in order to remain a healthy, resilient,
and prosperous community. To respond to this charge, community panelists
identified and prioritized significant challenges to the long-term prosperity of
the community, opportunities to respond to those challenges, and individual
and community actions to directly address challenges or realize opportunities.
Those challenges, opportunities, and actions, along with other important
outcomes from the three days, are highlighted in this report.
A detailed outline of the three day process is offered below.
4
STATEMENT FOR
OUR NEIGHBORS
KEY WEATHER AND CLIMATE FACTS
»» Data represent historical measurements over
the past century or more; they do not include
future projections.
»» The general character of Minnesota’s
climate, including in Winona County, is
trending toward rising temperatures and
more precipitation.
»» Temperatures are increasing in Minnesota at
a rate of 2°F/century.
»» Average minimum temperatures are
increasing faster than average maximum
temperatures, with the mean values of
nighttime minimum temperatures increasing
at twice the rate of the mean values of
daytime maximums.
»» Temperatures are increasing more in winter
than in other seasons.
We are 18 residents of Winona County who met for 3 days to consider changes in
our local weather and climate and the impacts of those changes on our community’s
economy, energy sector, water resources, insurance, public health, and agriculture.
Based on testimony from subject matter experts and group discussion among incredibly
diverse individuals with a wide range of viewpoints, we’ve changed our own views to
find common ground, creating the following list of challenges the community is facing,
opportunities to remain resilient and vibrant in the face of those changes, and actions
residents and our whole community can take now to begin responding to changes.
Evidence suggests that Minnesota’s climate and weather are changing more rapidly and
more dramatically than many other parts of the country, including through increasing
temperatures and more extreme weather events. These changes will have a real
measurable impact on our overall economy, our environment, fish and wildlife habitat,
health, insurance rates, and more.
Individually and as a Winona County community, we need to take action by working
together to prepare for the future. We need to educate ourselves, our neighbors, and our
elected officials to face challenges and pursue opportunities together. By doing so, we
can ensure Winona County remains vibrant, resilient, and prosperous into the future.
Change in average temperature from 1901-1960
period to 1991-2012 period. Graphic by Jaime Chismar
for Minnesota Public Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota
Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights
reserved. Data source: National Climate Assessment
5
1866-1965
Four mega-rains in 100 years
August 6, 1866
Killed 16 people in Fillmore
County.
July 17-19, 1867
Known as the state’s greatest flash
flood, in central Minnesota.
July 20-22, 1909
Extensive across northern
Minnesota, killed 2 children in
Duluth.
September 9-10, 1947
More than 8 inches in five hours at
Hibbing.
»» Precipitation is increasing at a rate of 4.4”/century in Southeast Minnesota, greater
than the state average. This increase can be explained in part by “mega storms.”
»» Minnesota has had 5 mega storms since
2002; there were only 7 mega storms in
the century prior to 2002. A mega storm is
defined as 6” or greater rains that cover at
least 1000 square miles and a peak amount
of 8” or greater.
»» More intense precipitation events
(thunderstorms/mega storms) create
larger geographic disparities (areas where
rain falls and where it doesn’t), leading
to a higher frequency of drought. It’s
becoming more common for Minnesota
counties to be declared a drought disaster
and a flood disaster in the same year.
»» Minnesota has seen a 37% increase in the
amount of precipitation falling in the heaviest 1% of all events.
»» These changes influence our economy, public health (heat waves, allergy season),
water resources, infrastructure, local wildlife and plant composition, and more.
1966-1999
Three mega-rains in 33 years
July 21-22, 1972
Nearly 11 inches in 24 hours at Ft.
Ripley, a state record at the time.
June 28-29 and July 1-2, 1975
Intense rain in northwestern
Minnesota in two events.
July 23, 1987
9 inches at Minneapolis-St. Paul
International Airport, a record.
2000-2014
Five mega-rains in 14 years
June 9-10, 2002
More than 12 inches in 48 hours in
northern Minnesota.
September 14-15, 2004
More than 10 inches in 36 hours in
Faribault and Freeborn counties.
August 18-20, 2007
15 inches near Hokah, state record
for 24 hours.
September 22-23, 2010
More than 10 inches at Amboy.
June 19-20, 2012
7 inches in two day in Duluth, St.
Louis River at record level.
Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. ©2015 Minnesota
Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: Minnesota
Department of Natural Resources. State Climatology
Graphic by Jaime
Chismar for Minnesota
Public Radio News.
© 2015 Minnesota
Public Radio. Used with
permission. All rights
reserved. Data source:
Minnesota DNR
6
TOP CHALLENGES FOR WINONA COUNTY
1.	 Adjusting farming practices and other rural and urban land
management to be adaptable to more frequent extreme weather
events while remaining lucrative and having a positive impact on the
environment.
•	 Across the Midwest, annual precipitation has increased (up to 20% in
some locations), leading to more frequent and higher magnitude flooding.
Consequences include degrading water quality and infrastructure, increased
spread of disease, and the introduction of toxic chemicals into the water supply.
•	 Supporting agricultural best management practices, including balanced planting
and crop diversity, and encouraging plantings of perennials, and buffers on
private and public land can improve water quality and reduce sediment runoff.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Take personal responsibility: Ensure home, business, and farm practices
that protect both the quantity and quality of our waters.
»» Let your voice be heard: Advocate for a balanced approach to land and
water management, one that ensures water equality.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Consider home, business, or public space strategies to promote water
retention instead of runoff – such as semi-permeable parking and
walkway surfaces, rain gardens, native plantings, and protecting your
nearby storm sewer from taking in pollutants and debris.
»» Support and develop land use policies that prepare for extremes: Limit
development in floodplains, the overuse of water supplies, and other
activities that will increase costs for everyone. Physically or financially,
flooding and water scarcity will affect all of us.
7
2.	 High intensity precipitation events may lead to short-term increases in
water temperature, higher magnitude flooding, erosion, runoff of sediments
and pollution, and degraded stream habitat for coldwater fish and other
aquatic invertebrates.
•	 Degraded water quality and water infrastructure are more likely to spread disease,
mold, and other pollutants and introduce toxic chemicals to the water supply,
especially during extreme weather events.
•	 Water is a priceless resource.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Go fishing! Money from trout stamp sales is critical for mitigation and
management.
»» Support sustainable agriculture and land use practices.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Look to new opportunities for agricultural production that lessen the impact on
the environment.
»» Slow runoff, increase infiltration, and improve efficiency of water use.
3.	 Technology changes quickly. To be knowledgeable about current energy
technology, individuals and organizations must know what energy issues to
address first and what technology to use.
•	 Local organizations, like the Southeast Clean Energy Resource Team (CERTs)
and others, can provide community members with resources to help successfully
implement energy project ideas.
•	 Tax credits for clean energy and solar were recently extended to help offset the cost
of clean energy adoption in the US and clean energy is a quickly developing market
experiencing triple digit growth in recent years.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Identify best available energy technologies: CERTS can help explore projects
that would work for your farm or business and provide you with one-on-one
assistance in developing a project. Explore the Clean Energy Project Builder.
Have your home assessed for energy best practices through an energy audit.
»» Find financing/funding for clean energy projects: Options include pursuing
Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (PACE) option. PACE provides a
loan up-front, with repayment occurring over anywhere from 5-20 years
on property taxes. You can also push your community to participate in the
Guaranteed Energy Savings Program (GESP).
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Pursue Guaranteed Energy Savings Plan (GESP), which provides financial and
technical assistance for public retrofits and distributed energy generation.
»» Milk The Savings, Dairy Energy Efficiency Program: CERTs can walk farmers
through the possibilities for farm energy efficiency upgrades, as well as answer
questions about improved energy efficiency. Additionally, CERTs can help
farmers consider options for renewable energy.
8
4.	 The annual cost of an average homeowners’ insurance policy in Minnesota
increased 310% ($368 to $1140) from 1998 to 2012 due to extreme weather
events. Premiums are still not high enough to cover all paid claims.
•	 There is a clear relationship between patterns in extreme weather events such as
hailstorms and floods and increases in insurance claims in Minnesota.
•	 Across the Midwest annual precipitation has increased (up to 20% in some
locations), with much of the increase due to more high intensity rain events. This
leads to more frequent and higher magnitude flooding.
•	 Minnesota is one of two states in the US without a high-risk home insurance pool to
spread risk proportionately among homeowners whose homes are at greater risk for
extreme weather events.
•	 Fewer than 1% of Minnesota’s one million households purchase flood insurance
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Support policy in Minnesota that allows insurances companies to create high-
risk insurance pools to spread risk evenly among policyholders who make
multiple weather-related claims within a short period of time.
»» Reduce fraud and curtail the rising cost of damage repairs in insurance claims by
developing relationships with local, trusted contractors.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Address knowledge gaps: Promote awareness of “storm chasers” (who
charge more than is necessary for repairs after storms); identify local, trusted
contractors; and promote education about policy that allows insurances
companies to create high-risk insurance pools.
»» Prepare for extremes: Limit development in floodplains, the overuse of water
supplies, and other activities that will increase costs for everyone. Physically or
financially we will all be affected by flooding and water scarcity.
9
TOP OPPORTUNITIES FOR WINONA COUNTY
1.	 Local development of clean energy can reduce the state’s dependence on
imported energy, which costs about $16 billion/year.
•	 Support is available. Tax credits for clean energy and solar were recently extended.
Local organizations, like CERTs, can provide community members with resources
because technology changes quickly.
•	 The clean energy economy is growing. Clean energy jobs increased by 78% in MN
in that last 15 years, compared to overall job growth of 11%. The average wage for a
sustainable energy job is 42% higher than the average state wage.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Through “Renewable Energy for Greater Minnesota,” Clean Energy Resources
Teams (CERTs) can help explore projects that would work for your farm or
business, identify potential funding and financing options, and provide you with
one-on-one assistance on developing a project.
»» Consider utilizing the Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (PACE) option.
PACE provides a loan up-front, with repayment occurring over anywhere from
5-20 years on property taxes. This eliminates much of initial cost burden, and
allows a more manageable payment plan for many participants.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Pursue Guaranteed Energy Savings Plan for public retrofits and distributed
energy generation to receive comprehensive technical and financial assistance
for state agencies, local government units, school districts, and institutions of
higher learning to reduce the knowledge and finance barriers to implementing
energy efficiency projects.
»» Participate in the Minnesota GreenStep Cities program. Minnesota GreenStep
Cities is a voluntary challenge, assistance, and recognition program to help
cities achieve their sustainability and quality-of-life goals. This free continuous
improvement program, managed by a public-private partnership, is based upon
29 best practices.
2.	 ‘Balance Watersheds’: Drained lands and impervious urban areas must be
offset by best management practices (BMPs) and ecosystem restorations
aimed at slowing runoff and storing water (infiltration, wetlands, floodplain
connectivity, etc.)
•	 Flood protection infrastructure must be designed for extremes. Unprotected areas need
infrastructure designed to withstand flooding.
•	 Investing in quality water systems now will allow SE Minnesota to respond quickly
and effectively in the event of extreme weather.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Take personal responsibility by assessing your land and practices; getting
technical and financial assistance if needed; and ensuring home and business
use protects both the quantity and quality of our waters.
»» Let your voice be heard: Advocate for a balanced approach to land and water
management – one that ensures equality in water allocation.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Support organizations that provide local assistance, like NRCS, SWCD, MDA, and
watershed groups.
»» Participate in the Minnesota GreenStep Cities program.
»» Develop land use policies that strengthen water quality and invest in
infrastructure improvements.
10
For the full list of challenges, opportunities,
actions, and other resources, visit:
JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG/WINONA
RURALCLIMATENETWORK.ORG/CONTENT/
RURAL-CLIMATE-DIALOGUE-WINONA-MN
3.	 Adopting agricultural best management practices and planting perennials
can reduce nutrient, soil, and water loss while maintaining production and
profitability.
•	 Encouraging balanced planting in urban and rural environments, promoting crop
diversity, and using forages instead of or in addition to corn and soybeans reduces
runoff.
•	 Buffer strips could significantly improve water quality and remove sediment from
Minnesota water.
•	 These practices could help reduce the spread of diseases, mold, and other pollutants
through runoff, floods, and other extreme weather events.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Plant pollinator habitat, native plants and prairie grasses, and/or rain gardens on
your personal property, considering applicable local statutes.
»» Pursue grants or other financial assistance to help implement best management
practices.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Develop land use policies and practices that strengthen water quality, invest in
infrastructure improvements, and support beginning and existing farmers in
looking to new opportunities and adopting new practices.
»» Support programs that provide assistance (NRCS, SWCD, MDA, watershed
groups) that aid in production and profitability for agricultural producers.
4.	 Southeastern Minnesota should strive for healthy, responsible land use
practices – especially with agriculture and mining. Healthy shorelines and
streams are more resilient to flood events.
INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS:
»» Support state policies that promote healthy land use and natural resource
management, support investment in infrastructure improvements, and advocate
for land use policies that strengthen water quality.
»» Assess your private land and practices and implement agricultural best
management practices/perennials where needed.
COMMUNITY ACTIONS:
»» Seek technical and financial assistance to assess public land and practices on a
community-scale.
»» Support research, outreach, and education among farmers and consumers,
allowing farmers to adopt new practices.
11
DEMOGRAPHIC
WINONA COUNTY
PERCENTAGE
IDEAL # OF
PARTICIPANTS
ACTUAL #
OF PARTICIPANTS
GENDER
Female 51% 9 9
Male 51% 9 9
RACE/ETHNICITY
Caucasian/White 94% 16 16
Persons of Color/Multiracial 6% 2 2
PARTY AFFILIATION
Democrat 38% 7 5
No Party, Other 28% 5 8
Republican 34% 6 5
AGE
18-39 44% 8 6
40-64 38% 7 9
65 & over 18% 3 3
WINONA / GREATER WINONA
Winona 54% 10 10
Greater Winona 46% 8 8
EDUCATION
Less than High School 9% 2 0
High School or GED 52% 9 6
Associate’s/Bachelor’s 29% 5 9
Graduate degree 10% 2 3
ATTITUDE ON CLIMATE CHANGE
Worried 50% 9 11
Not Worried 50% 9 7
TOTAL NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS 100% 18 18
Invitations to participate in the Winona County Climate Dialogue were sent to 5,000
randomly selected households in Winona County. Interested citizens completed
a questionnaire with demographic information and were then added to a pool of
potential panelists. 18 panelists were selected from that pool, chosen anonymously to
match the demographics, as near as possible, of the county.
PANELIST DEMOGRAPHICS
12
PANELIST PERSPECTIVES
“At times I feel completely
victimized because we
see all these bad things
happening that you can’t do
anything about individually.
It’s really refreshing to
sit down with a bunch of
community members and
realize you share the same
core values and are united.”
“I have a feeling of accomplishment,
of facing something that I’ve
been avoiding. There was an air
of respectfulness for everyone’s
viewpoints. I don’t know exactly
what I want to do going forward,
but I want to do something, and
it feels good to participate in my
community like that.”
“From a personal standpoint, I feel like I grew.
My views have changed – I was wrong. I was dead wrong.”
“You can go into a situation with your mind made up,
but with the right information you can really change
your mind, and I think that’s where we come in
when we go home and talk to our neighbors.”
13
WINONA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENT DIALOGUE
To incorporate the voices of young people in the climate conversation, we work to convene a
student dialogue that parallels the community Winona County Climate Dialogue.
Our student dialogue focused on topics aligned with student interests and areas of study,
including the impact of climate change on Winona’s outdoor recreation opportunities,
wildlife and habitat implications, changes in the spread of disease, and impacts of future
floods. Students were also studying the life cycles and population health of trout through
a partnership with Trout Unlimited, providing a curriculum crossover with Jennifer
Biederman’s research on the changing condition of trout streams in Winona County.
Peter Weess’ environmental science and biology students prepared for the 90 minute panel
of experts with a presentation by Mark Seeley (University of Minnesota Extension), focused
on historical weather trends and extreme weather incidents. Following this presentation,
students created questions for the expert panel using data from Mark’s presentation,
information from their coursework, and personal knowledge and interest.
Nearly 100 students settled into the auditorium for the 90 minute Q&A session with local
experts. The panel consisted of:
Jennifer Biederman – Professor of Biology, Winona State University
Kevin Kelleher – Business Development Specialist, MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development
Tex Hawkins – Sustainability Advisor, Winona State University
Lynnea Pfohl – Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project
Eric Barnard – Director of Outdoor Education, Winona State University
While the panelists fielded questions relevant to their own expertise, citing statistics and
professional understanding that comes from years of experience, they reminded the students
that they have a voice “more powerful than ours as it more clearly represents the future.”
Weess’ students will continue to engage in this conversation by writing letters to the editor,
connecting with members of the community Climate Dialogue, and pursuing a local water
quality restoration project, among other opportunities percolating.
You can read more about the students’ work at:
ruralclimatenetwork.org/content/rural-climate-dialogue-winona-mn
14
The Jefferson Center is a nonpartisan organization committed to strengthening
democracy by advancing informed, citizen-led solutions to challenging public issues
through deliberation and community action. We’re collaborating with governments,
nonprofits, and others to unleash the power of citizens and solve today’s toughest
challenges.Wefocusonbuildingpowerfulcoalitions,creatingmeaningfulopportunities
for education and public deliberation, and empowering citizen-led action.
The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy is a Minnesota-based nonprofit
working locally and globally at the intersection of policy and practice to ensure fair
and sustainable food, farm and trade systems and to foster vibrant, prosperous rural
communities. We support rural communities through research, market development,
and policy advocacy to address local challenges, including issues associated with
extreme weather and a changing climate.
The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy are in the
process of identifying communities across Minnesota for future Climate Dialogues. If
you are interested in hosting a Dialogue in your community, or would like to receive
additional information, please contact:
Andrew Rockway at arockway@jefferson-center.org / 651-209-7672
Anna Claussen at aclaussen@iatp.org / 612-870-3423
Hosting a Climate Dialogue requires significant engagement with community
members months prior to the event in order to identify issues of principal concern,
engage local and regional experts, work with community institutions to develop
information sources, and determine community receptivity among policymakers and
the general public to incorporate Dialogue findings into community planning efforts.
INTERESTED IN YOUR OWN CLIMATE DIALOGUE?
JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG
@JEFFERSONCTR
HELLO@JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG
IATP.ORG
@IATP
ACLAUSSEN@IATP.ORG

More Related Content

What's hot

Stiles climate campaign
Stiles   climate campaignStiles   climate campaign
Stiles climate campaign
SELPConference
 
Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?
Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?
Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?
mehcslides
 
Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...
Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...
Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...
Jonathan Dunnemann
 
Workshop 1 - Julie Doll
Workshop 1 - Julie DollWorkshop 1 - Julie Doll
Workshop 1 - Julie Doll
Soil and Water Conservation Society
 
Critical Review of Managed Annihilation
Critical Review of Managed AnnihilationCritical Review of Managed Annihilation
Critical Review of Managed Annihilation
Caroline Grangier
 
Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...
Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...
Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...
Alana Tornello
 
Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...
Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...
Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...
Erin Bohensky
 
Rappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For Flooding
Rappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For FloodingRappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For Flooding
Rappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For Flooding
Erica Mattison
 
ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2
Mariah Harrod
 
Oceans & Fisheries
Oceans & FisheriesOceans & Fisheries
Oceans & Fisheries
The Rockefeller Foundation
 
Cpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012 policy brie
Cpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012  policy brieCpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012  policy brie
Cpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012 policy brie
AMMY30
 
IW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-Digital
IW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-DigitalIW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-Digital
IW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-Digital
LU SUN
 
Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...
Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...
Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...
IIED
 
2012 Annual Report
2012 Annual Report2012 Annual Report
2012 Annual Report
National Wildlife Federation
 
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climateSNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
American Planning Association - Massachusetts Chapter
 
Parsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference Presentation
Parsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference PresentationParsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference Presentation
Parsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference Presentation
Ane Deister
 
What are the Social Impacts of Mining?
What are the Social Impacts of Mining?What are the Social Impacts of Mining?
What are the Social Impacts of Mining?
Ethical Sector
 
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation PlanHerrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
ELEEP Network
 
NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013
NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013
NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013
New Jersey Future
 
RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018
RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018
RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018
MYO AUNG Myanmar
 

What's hot (20)

Stiles climate campaign
Stiles   climate campaignStiles   climate campaign
Stiles climate campaign
 
Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?
Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?
Can Diversity Make Us Stronger?
 
Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...
Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...
Urban green space, public health, and environmental justice: The challenge of...
 
Workshop 1 - Julie Doll
Workshop 1 - Julie DollWorkshop 1 - Julie Doll
Workshop 1 - Julie Doll
 
Critical Review of Managed Annihilation
Critical Review of Managed AnnihilationCritical Review of Managed Annihilation
Critical Review of Managed Annihilation
 
Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...
Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...
Testimony-on-Community-Taskforce-for-City-Council-Com-on-Recovery-and-Resilie...
 
Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...
Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...
Media frames and Memory: Social constructions of climate change following the...
 
Rappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For Flooding
Rappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For FloodingRappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For Flooding
Rappaport Article_Massachusetts Must Prepare Now For Flooding
 
ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2
 
Oceans & Fisheries
Oceans & FisheriesOceans & Fisheries
Oceans & Fisheries
 
Cpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012 policy brie
Cpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012  policy brieCpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012  policy brie
Cpd water diplomacy initiative april 2012 policy brie
 
IW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-Digital
IW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-DigitalIW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-Digital
IW PublicationCaseStudiesMay-Digital
 
Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...
Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...
Equity workshop: Balancing equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Se...
 
2012 Annual Report
2012 Annual Report2012 Annual Report
2012 Annual Report
 
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climateSNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
 
Parsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference Presentation
Parsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference PresentationParsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference Presentation
Parsons Deister AWWA - Sustainable Water Management Conference Presentation
 
What are the Social Impacts of Mining?
What are the Social Impacts of Mining?What are the Social Impacts of Mining?
What are the Social Impacts of Mining?
 
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation PlanHerrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
 
NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013
NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013
NJ Future Sandy One Year Later Planning Sheats Oct 29 2013
 
RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018
RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018
RELIEFWEB MYANMAR UPDATE MAY -JUNE 2018
 

Similar to Rural Climate Dialogues: Winona

Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
nado-web
 
Upstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate Change
Upstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate ChangeUpstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate Change
Upstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate Change
Cornell University Cooperative Extension, Human Dimensions Research Unit
 
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly WoloszynWorkshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Soil and Water Conservation Society
 
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly WoloszynClimate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Soil and Water Conservation Society
 
2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...
2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...
2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...
OpenSpaceCouncil
 
Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)
Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)
Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)
Sharon Barasa
 
MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSINMITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
Flanna489y
 
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate ResilienceGender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
 
Village disaster management plan
Village disaster management planVillage disaster management plan
Village disaster management plan
Pradeep Panda
 
Youth Environmental Activists of Minnesota
Youth Environmental Activists of MinnesotaYouth Environmental Activists of Minnesota
Youth Environmental Activists of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
 
Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...
Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...
Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...
Matthew Nisbet
 
Global Environmental Issues
Global Environmental IssuesGlobal Environmental Issues
Global Environmental Issues
Megan Espinoza
 
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
Mill City Times
 
Jefferson center annual report 2016
Jefferson center   annual report 2016Jefferson center   annual report 2016
Jefferson center annual report 2016
Jefferson Center
 
Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...
Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...
Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...
Bibhuti Bhusan Gadanayak
 
Community resilience concept
Community resilience conceptCommunity resilience concept
Community resilience concept
Pradeep Mohapatra
 
Community resilience concept
Community resilience conceptCommunity resilience concept
Community resilience concept
Pradeep Mohapatra
 
Community resilience concept
Community resilience conceptCommunity resilience concept
Community resilience concept
Pradeep Mohapatra
 
MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]
MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]
MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]
Brent M. Simpson
 
Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...
Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...
Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...
Matthew Nisbet
 

Similar to Rural Climate Dialogues: Winona (20)

Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
 
Upstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate Change
Upstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate ChangeUpstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate Change
Upstate Rural New York Residents’ Perceptions of Climate Change
 
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly WoloszynWorkshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
 
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly WoloszynClimate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
 
2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...
2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...
2017 Open Space Conference - Communications: Building a Bridge Between Messag...
 
Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)
Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)
Nairobi Informal Settlements_CC_Final Report_22Apr2016 (1)
 
MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSINMITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
 
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate ResilienceGender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
 
Village disaster management plan
Village disaster management planVillage disaster management plan
Village disaster management plan
 
Youth Environmental Activists of Minnesota
Youth Environmental Activists of MinnesotaYouth Environmental Activists of Minnesota
Youth Environmental Activists of Minnesota
 
Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...
Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...
Preparing for Abrupt Climate Change: Building Civic Capacity and Overcoming P...
 
Global Environmental Issues
Global Environmental IssuesGlobal Environmental Issues
Global Environmental Issues
 
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
 
Jefferson center annual report 2016
Jefferson center   annual report 2016Jefferson center   annual report 2016
Jefferson center annual report 2016
 
Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...
Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...
Role of Civil Society in DRR  Implementation of the SFDRR in the context of U...
 
Community resilience concept
Community resilience conceptCommunity resilience concept
Community resilience concept
 
Community resilience concept
Community resilience conceptCommunity resilience concept
Community resilience concept
 
Community resilience concept
Community resilience conceptCommunity resilience concept
Community resilience concept
 
MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]
MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]
MEAS Discussion Paper 3 - Climate Change and EAS - Jan 2014[1]
 
Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...
Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...
Climate Resilience and Innovation in a Polarized Society: Strategies to Infor...
 

More from Jefferson Center

Steven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy FutureSteven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy Future
Jefferson Center
 
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart MunicipalityCity of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
Jefferson Center
 
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy PrimerMorris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Jefferson Center
 
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum ReportTwin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
Jefferson Center
 
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic ErrorClearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Jefferson Center
 
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Jefferson Center
 
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Jefferson Center
 
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Jefferson Center
 

More from Jefferson Center (8)

Steven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy FutureSteven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy Future
 
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart MunicipalityCity of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
 
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy PrimerMorris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
 
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum ReportTwin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
 
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic ErrorClearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
 
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
 
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
 
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
 

Recently uploaded

University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
etwvyv
 
VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...
VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...
VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...
nitikag840
 
George Washington University degree offer diploma Transcript
George Washington University degree offer diploma TranscriptGeorge Washington University degree offer diploma Transcript
George Washington University degree offer diploma Transcript
etwvyv
 
University of California, Irvine degree offer diploma Transcript
University of California, Irvine degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of California, Irvine degree offer diploma Transcript
University of California, Irvine degree offer diploma Transcript
etwvyv
 
Desertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptx
Desertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptxDesertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptx
Desertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptx
jasmeekdhillon
 
Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...
Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...
Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...
girl escorts service
 
The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and Trends
The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and TrendsThe Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and Trends
The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and Trends
greendigital
 
Nuclear Waste Management
Nuclear Waste ManagementNuclear Waste Management
Nuclear Waste Management
Dr. Salem Baidas
 
VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
janvikumar4133
 
Relation between tourism and environment in development
Relation between tourism and environment in developmentRelation between tourism and environment in development
Relation between tourism and environment in development
bikramkunwar2020d
 
WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....
WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....
WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....
geetikamehta1998
 
PREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docx
PREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docxPREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docx
PREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docx
saisruthikunduru
 
The Bank of Punjab: The Official Website
The Bank of Punjab: The Official WebsiteThe Bank of Punjab: The Official Website
The Bank of Punjab: The Official Website
reema kushawaha
 
Community Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
Community Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSECommunity Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
Community Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
norhain4a
 
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
Dr. Salem Baidas
 
Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...
Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...
Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...
44annissa
 
Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...
Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...
Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...
sonamrawat5631
 
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete GuideBest Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Jakariya sarkar
 
Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
Ak47
 
COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030
COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030
COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030
shannenchiww
 

Recently uploaded (20)

University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
 
VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...
VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...
VVIP Girls Call Bangalore 000XX00000 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No...
 
George Washington University degree offer diploma Transcript
George Washington University degree offer diploma TranscriptGeorge Washington University degree offer diploma Transcript
George Washington University degree offer diploma Transcript
 
University of California, Irvine degree offer diploma Transcript
University of California, Irvine degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of California, Irvine degree offer diploma Transcript
University of California, Irvine degree offer diploma Transcript
 
Desertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptx
Desertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptxDesertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptx
Desertification-A Project by Gurnaaz.pptx
 
Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...
Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...
Mumbai Girls Call WhatsApp Numbers 🫦9833363713🫦 List For Friendship Girls Ser...
 
The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and Trends
The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and TrendsThe Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and Trends
The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth Hair: A Journey Through Styles and Trends
 
Nuclear Waste Management
Nuclear Waste ManagementNuclear Waste Management
Nuclear Waste Management
 
VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
VIP Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
 
Relation between tourism and environment in development
Relation between tourism and environment in developmentRelation between tourism and environment in development
Relation between tourism and environment in development
 
WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....
WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....
WORLD POPULATION AND YOUTH DAY 2024.....
 
PREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docx
PREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docxPREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docx
PREDICTION OF WATER PORTABILITY USING CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES.docx
 
The Bank of Punjab: The Official Website
The Bank of Punjab: The Official WebsiteThe Bank of Punjab: The Official Website
The Bank of Punjab: The Official Website
 
Community Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
Community Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSECommunity Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
Community Health Nursing PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
 
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
 
Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...
Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...
Beautiful Girls Call Mumbai 9910780858 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And ...
 
Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...
Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...
Dating Girls Call Delhi 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 ...
 
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete GuideBest Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
 
Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
Girls Call Pitampura 9711199171 Provide Best And Top Girl Service And No1 in ...
 
COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030
COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030
COM322A slide show singapore ambitious green plan 2030
 

Rural Climate Dialogues: Winona

  • 2. 2 RURAL CLIMATE DIALOGUES Rural communities are at-risk to be seriously affected by both the direct impacts of a changing climate (e.g. extreme weather) and by efforts to mitigate those changes. This is especially true in considering solutions and policies that increase energy, resource, or transportation costs. At the same time, much of the “production” in climate-sensitive economies will occur in rural areas, including through renewable energy deployment, reinvigorated local and regional food economies, and changes to land use patterns. Rural communities will and must play an integral role in addressing climate issues. Despite this significance, rural communities have often been overlooked in climate conversations; political debate and policy changes have tended to emphasize urban and suburban perspectives. In many communities, incomplete information and limited public participation have prevented sound, publicly- supported policy from emerging. But it doesn’t have to stay this way. Rural residents and communities can develop innovative solutions that respond to local and regional challenges to remain vibrant and prosperous. Recent research has shown that 85 percent of rural Minnesotans feel that people like themselves can make an impact and improve local quality of life; 75 percent believe their community can work together across differences. Drawing on this resilient attitude, rural communities – in conjunction with the Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy – are seeking to move conversations on climate change forward. Climate Dialogues help rural communities think critically and plan strategically to address local challenges related to weather and climate. To foster high-quality engagement, we use the time-tested Citizens Jury method for community problem solving and leadership development. This approach—which brings together a microcosm of the community to study an issue in-depth and generate a shared community response—has consistently provided a productive, educational, and inclusive way to address complex, divisive challenges. The Winona County Climate Dialogue is the third in a series of projects aimed at galvanizing rural citizens to assert leadership and build resiliency in the face of extreme weather and changing climate conditions. This Dialogue brought together a randomly selected but demographically balanced group of 18 citizens from Winona County in an intense, three-day moderated study and deliberation forum. They were tasked with creating a shared, community-based response to changing weather conditions and extreme weather events. Beyond that charge, the group was completely citizen-driven— no one told them what to do or what to think. The panel had the liberty, information, and resources to produce their own recommendations that respond to community needs, priorities, concerns, and values in order to maintain and strengthen the resilience and prosperity of Winona County. These recommendations will serve as a starting point for community conversations on extreme weather and climate. The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, along with our local partners, will work to widely publicize the event and engage panelists and community members inspired by the conversation to work on these issues as local leaders. We’ll continue to support the community as they work to implement citizen recommendations. The Rural Climate Dialogues help develop and amplify an informed voice of the people so that regional, state, and national policymakers can take their needs into account when developing climate policy. Through the expansion of this project, we hope to build better climate change policy and stronger, civic- minded communities across rural Minnesota.
  • 3. 3 DIALOGUE PROCESS DAY 1 »» Panelists meet one another and discuss goals and expectations for the 3 days »» Panelists engage in a simulation exercise as an introduction to the process of assessing information and working together to achieve shared results »» Panelists determine how to develop clear and useful information for sharing with their neighbors »» Presentation on local extreme weather and climate conditions by Mark Seeley (University of Minnesota Extension) »» Presentation by Lynn Hinkle (MnSEIA) and Chris Meyer (SE CERTs) on energy DAY 2 »» Presentation by Jennifer Biederman (Winona State University) and Josh Eash (Fish & Wildlife Service) on water resources »» Presentation by Mark Kulda (Insurance Federation of Minnesota) on insurance »» Presentation by Bruce Snyder (University of Minnesota) on public health »» Presentation by Jake Overgaard (UMN Extension) on agriculture DAY 3 »» Panelists identify and select top challenges »» Panelists identify and select top opportunities »» Panelists provide important evidence for each challenge and opportunity »» Panelists identify top actions »» Panelists write final statement in group editing process Eighteen Winona County citizens met at the Winona State University Tau Center in Winona, Minnesota for 3 days, 8:30am to 5:00pm, starting Thursday, March 3rd and concluding Saturday, March 5th. Participants were randomly selected and stratified to include a balanced representation of the Winona County population. Participants were paid $375 plus expenses for the three days. The group was tasked with deciding how Winona County might best address extreme weather and a changing climate in order to remain a healthy, resilient, and prosperous community. To respond to this charge, community panelists identified and prioritized significant challenges to the long-term prosperity of the community, opportunities to respond to those challenges, and individual and community actions to directly address challenges or realize opportunities. Those challenges, opportunities, and actions, along with other important outcomes from the three days, are highlighted in this report. A detailed outline of the three day process is offered below.
  • 4. 4 STATEMENT FOR OUR NEIGHBORS KEY WEATHER AND CLIMATE FACTS »» Data represent historical measurements over the past century or more; they do not include future projections. »» The general character of Minnesota’s climate, including in Winona County, is trending toward rising temperatures and more precipitation. »» Temperatures are increasing in Minnesota at a rate of 2°F/century. »» Average minimum temperatures are increasing faster than average maximum temperatures, with the mean values of nighttime minimum temperatures increasing at twice the rate of the mean values of daytime maximums. »» Temperatures are increasing more in winter than in other seasons. We are 18 residents of Winona County who met for 3 days to consider changes in our local weather and climate and the impacts of those changes on our community’s economy, energy sector, water resources, insurance, public health, and agriculture. Based on testimony from subject matter experts and group discussion among incredibly diverse individuals with a wide range of viewpoints, we’ve changed our own views to find common ground, creating the following list of challenges the community is facing, opportunities to remain resilient and vibrant in the face of those changes, and actions residents and our whole community can take now to begin responding to changes. Evidence suggests that Minnesota’s climate and weather are changing more rapidly and more dramatically than many other parts of the country, including through increasing temperatures and more extreme weather events. These changes will have a real measurable impact on our overall economy, our environment, fish and wildlife habitat, health, insurance rates, and more. Individually and as a Winona County community, we need to take action by working together to prepare for the future. We need to educate ourselves, our neighbors, and our elected officials to face challenges and pursue opportunities together. By doing so, we can ensure Winona County remains vibrant, resilient, and prosperous into the future. Change in average temperature from 1901-1960 period to 1991-2012 period. Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: National Climate Assessment
  • 5. 5 1866-1965 Four mega-rains in 100 years August 6, 1866 Killed 16 people in Fillmore County. July 17-19, 1867 Known as the state’s greatest flash flood, in central Minnesota. July 20-22, 1909 Extensive across northern Minnesota, killed 2 children in Duluth. September 9-10, 1947 More than 8 inches in five hours at Hibbing. »» Precipitation is increasing at a rate of 4.4”/century in Southeast Minnesota, greater than the state average. This increase can be explained in part by “mega storms.” »» Minnesota has had 5 mega storms since 2002; there were only 7 mega storms in the century prior to 2002. A mega storm is defined as 6” or greater rains that cover at least 1000 square miles and a peak amount of 8” or greater. »» More intense precipitation events (thunderstorms/mega storms) create larger geographic disparities (areas where rain falls and where it doesn’t), leading to a higher frequency of drought. It’s becoming more common for Minnesota counties to be declared a drought disaster and a flood disaster in the same year. »» Minnesota has seen a 37% increase in the amount of precipitation falling in the heaviest 1% of all events. »» These changes influence our economy, public health (heat waves, allergy season), water resources, infrastructure, local wildlife and plant composition, and more. 1966-1999 Three mega-rains in 33 years July 21-22, 1972 Nearly 11 inches in 24 hours at Ft. Ripley, a state record at the time. June 28-29 and July 1-2, 1975 Intense rain in northwestern Minnesota in two events. July 23, 1987 9 inches at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, a record. 2000-2014 Five mega-rains in 14 years June 9-10, 2002 More than 12 inches in 48 hours in northern Minnesota. September 14-15, 2004 More than 10 inches in 36 hours in Faribault and Freeborn counties. August 18-20, 2007 15 inches near Hokah, state record for 24 hours. September 22-23, 2010 More than 10 inches at Amboy. June 19-20, 2012 7 inches in two day in Duluth, St. Louis River at record level. Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. ©2015 Minnesota Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. State Climatology Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: Minnesota DNR
  • 6. 6 TOP CHALLENGES FOR WINONA COUNTY 1. Adjusting farming practices and other rural and urban land management to be adaptable to more frequent extreme weather events while remaining lucrative and having a positive impact on the environment. • Across the Midwest, annual precipitation has increased (up to 20% in some locations), leading to more frequent and higher magnitude flooding. Consequences include degrading water quality and infrastructure, increased spread of disease, and the introduction of toxic chemicals into the water supply. • Supporting agricultural best management practices, including balanced planting and crop diversity, and encouraging plantings of perennials, and buffers on private and public land can improve water quality and reduce sediment runoff. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Take personal responsibility: Ensure home, business, and farm practices that protect both the quantity and quality of our waters. »» Let your voice be heard: Advocate for a balanced approach to land and water management, one that ensures water equality. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Consider home, business, or public space strategies to promote water retention instead of runoff – such as semi-permeable parking and walkway surfaces, rain gardens, native plantings, and protecting your nearby storm sewer from taking in pollutants and debris. »» Support and develop land use policies that prepare for extremes: Limit development in floodplains, the overuse of water supplies, and other activities that will increase costs for everyone. Physically or financially, flooding and water scarcity will affect all of us.
  • 7. 7 2. High intensity precipitation events may lead to short-term increases in water temperature, higher magnitude flooding, erosion, runoff of sediments and pollution, and degraded stream habitat for coldwater fish and other aquatic invertebrates. • Degraded water quality and water infrastructure are more likely to spread disease, mold, and other pollutants and introduce toxic chemicals to the water supply, especially during extreme weather events. • Water is a priceless resource. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Go fishing! Money from trout stamp sales is critical for mitigation and management. »» Support sustainable agriculture and land use practices. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Look to new opportunities for agricultural production that lessen the impact on the environment. »» Slow runoff, increase infiltration, and improve efficiency of water use. 3. Technology changes quickly. To be knowledgeable about current energy technology, individuals and organizations must know what energy issues to address first and what technology to use. • Local organizations, like the Southeast Clean Energy Resource Team (CERTs) and others, can provide community members with resources to help successfully implement energy project ideas. • Tax credits for clean energy and solar were recently extended to help offset the cost of clean energy adoption in the US and clean energy is a quickly developing market experiencing triple digit growth in recent years. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Identify best available energy technologies: CERTS can help explore projects that would work for your farm or business and provide you with one-on-one assistance in developing a project. Explore the Clean Energy Project Builder. Have your home assessed for energy best practices through an energy audit. »» Find financing/funding for clean energy projects: Options include pursuing Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (PACE) option. PACE provides a loan up-front, with repayment occurring over anywhere from 5-20 years on property taxes. You can also push your community to participate in the Guaranteed Energy Savings Program (GESP). COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Pursue Guaranteed Energy Savings Plan (GESP), which provides financial and technical assistance for public retrofits and distributed energy generation. »» Milk The Savings, Dairy Energy Efficiency Program: CERTs can walk farmers through the possibilities for farm energy efficiency upgrades, as well as answer questions about improved energy efficiency. Additionally, CERTs can help farmers consider options for renewable energy.
  • 8. 8 4. The annual cost of an average homeowners’ insurance policy in Minnesota increased 310% ($368 to $1140) from 1998 to 2012 due to extreme weather events. Premiums are still not high enough to cover all paid claims. • There is a clear relationship between patterns in extreme weather events such as hailstorms and floods and increases in insurance claims in Minnesota. • Across the Midwest annual precipitation has increased (up to 20% in some locations), with much of the increase due to more high intensity rain events. This leads to more frequent and higher magnitude flooding. • Minnesota is one of two states in the US without a high-risk home insurance pool to spread risk proportionately among homeowners whose homes are at greater risk for extreme weather events. • Fewer than 1% of Minnesota’s one million households purchase flood insurance INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Support policy in Minnesota that allows insurances companies to create high- risk insurance pools to spread risk evenly among policyholders who make multiple weather-related claims within a short period of time. »» Reduce fraud and curtail the rising cost of damage repairs in insurance claims by developing relationships with local, trusted contractors. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Address knowledge gaps: Promote awareness of “storm chasers” (who charge more than is necessary for repairs after storms); identify local, trusted contractors; and promote education about policy that allows insurances companies to create high-risk insurance pools. »» Prepare for extremes: Limit development in floodplains, the overuse of water supplies, and other activities that will increase costs for everyone. Physically or financially we will all be affected by flooding and water scarcity.
  • 9. 9 TOP OPPORTUNITIES FOR WINONA COUNTY 1. Local development of clean energy can reduce the state’s dependence on imported energy, which costs about $16 billion/year. • Support is available. Tax credits for clean energy and solar were recently extended. Local organizations, like CERTs, can provide community members with resources because technology changes quickly. • The clean energy economy is growing. Clean energy jobs increased by 78% in MN in that last 15 years, compared to overall job growth of 11%. The average wage for a sustainable energy job is 42% higher than the average state wage. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Through “Renewable Energy for Greater Minnesota,” Clean Energy Resources Teams (CERTs) can help explore projects that would work for your farm or business, identify potential funding and financing options, and provide you with one-on-one assistance on developing a project. »» Consider utilizing the Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing (PACE) option. PACE provides a loan up-front, with repayment occurring over anywhere from 5-20 years on property taxes. This eliminates much of initial cost burden, and allows a more manageable payment plan for many participants. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Pursue Guaranteed Energy Savings Plan for public retrofits and distributed energy generation to receive comprehensive technical and financial assistance for state agencies, local government units, school districts, and institutions of higher learning to reduce the knowledge and finance barriers to implementing energy efficiency projects. »» Participate in the Minnesota GreenStep Cities program. Minnesota GreenStep Cities is a voluntary challenge, assistance, and recognition program to help cities achieve their sustainability and quality-of-life goals. This free continuous improvement program, managed by a public-private partnership, is based upon 29 best practices. 2. ‘Balance Watersheds’: Drained lands and impervious urban areas must be offset by best management practices (BMPs) and ecosystem restorations aimed at slowing runoff and storing water (infiltration, wetlands, floodplain connectivity, etc.) • Flood protection infrastructure must be designed for extremes. Unprotected areas need infrastructure designed to withstand flooding. • Investing in quality water systems now will allow SE Minnesota to respond quickly and effectively in the event of extreme weather. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Take personal responsibility by assessing your land and practices; getting technical and financial assistance if needed; and ensuring home and business use protects both the quantity and quality of our waters. »» Let your voice be heard: Advocate for a balanced approach to land and water management – one that ensures equality in water allocation. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Support organizations that provide local assistance, like NRCS, SWCD, MDA, and watershed groups. »» Participate in the Minnesota GreenStep Cities program. »» Develop land use policies that strengthen water quality and invest in infrastructure improvements.
  • 10. 10 For the full list of challenges, opportunities, actions, and other resources, visit: JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG/WINONA RURALCLIMATENETWORK.ORG/CONTENT/ RURAL-CLIMATE-DIALOGUE-WINONA-MN 3. Adopting agricultural best management practices and planting perennials can reduce nutrient, soil, and water loss while maintaining production and profitability. • Encouraging balanced planting in urban and rural environments, promoting crop diversity, and using forages instead of or in addition to corn and soybeans reduces runoff. • Buffer strips could significantly improve water quality and remove sediment from Minnesota water. • These practices could help reduce the spread of diseases, mold, and other pollutants through runoff, floods, and other extreme weather events. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Plant pollinator habitat, native plants and prairie grasses, and/or rain gardens on your personal property, considering applicable local statutes. »» Pursue grants or other financial assistance to help implement best management practices. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Develop land use policies and practices that strengthen water quality, invest in infrastructure improvements, and support beginning and existing farmers in looking to new opportunities and adopting new practices. »» Support programs that provide assistance (NRCS, SWCD, MDA, watershed groups) that aid in production and profitability for agricultural producers. 4. Southeastern Minnesota should strive for healthy, responsible land use practices – especially with agriculture and mining. Healthy shorelines and streams are more resilient to flood events. INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS: »» Support state policies that promote healthy land use and natural resource management, support investment in infrastructure improvements, and advocate for land use policies that strengthen water quality. »» Assess your private land and practices and implement agricultural best management practices/perennials where needed. COMMUNITY ACTIONS: »» Seek technical and financial assistance to assess public land and practices on a community-scale. »» Support research, outreach, and education among farmers and consumers, allowing farmers to adopt new practices.
  • 11. 11 DEMOGRAPHIC WINONA COUNTY PERCENTAGE IDEAL # OF PARTICIPANTS ACTUAL # OF PARTICIPANTS GENDER Female 51% 9 9 Male 51% 9 9 RACE/ETHNICITY Caucasian/White 94% 16 16 Persons of Color/Multiracial 6% 2 2 PARTY AFFILIATION Democrat 38% 7 5 No Party, Other 28% 5 8 Republican 34% 6 5 AGE 18-39 44% 8 6 40-64 38% 7 9 65 & over 18% 3 3 WINONA / GREATER WINONA Winona 54% 10 10 Greater Winona 46% 8 8 EDUCATION Less than High School 9% 2 0 High School or GED 52% 9 6 Associate’s/Bachelor’s 29% 5 9 Graduate degree 10% 2 3 ATTITUDE ON CLIMATE CHANGE Worried 50% 9 11 Not Worried 50% 9 7 TOTAL NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS 100% 18 18 Invitations to participate in the Winona County Climate Dialogue were sent to 5,000 randomly selected households in Winona County. Interested citizens completed a questionnaire with demographic information and were then added to a pool of potential panelists. 18 panelists were selected from that pool, chosen anonymously to match the demographics, as near as possible, of the county. PANELIST DEMOGRAPHICS
  • 12. 12 PANELIST PERSPECTIVES “At times I feel completely victimized because we see all these bad things happening that you can’t do anything about individually. It’s really refreshing to sit down with a bunch of community members and realize you share the same core values and are united.” “I have a feeling of accomplishment, of facing something that I’ve been avoiding. There was an air of respectfulness for everyone’s viewpoints. I don’t know exactly what I want to do going forward, but I want to do something, and it feels good to participate in my community like that.” “From a personal standpoint, I feel like I grew. My views have changed – I was wrong. I was dead wrong.” “You can go into a situation with your mind made up, but with the right information you can really change your mind, and I think that’s where we come in when we go home and talk to our neighbors.”
  • 13. 13 WINONA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT DIALOGUE To incorporate the voices of young people in the climate conversation, we work to convene a student dialogue that parallels the community Winona County Climate Dialogue. Our student dialogue focused on topics aligned with student interests and areas of study, including the impact of climate change on Winona’s outdoor recreation opportunities, wildlife and habitat implications, changes in the spread of disease, and impacts of future floods. Students were also studying the life cycles and population health of trout through a partnership with Trout Unlimited, providing a curriculum crossover with Jennifer Biederman’s research on the changing condition of trout streams in Winona County. Peter Weess’ environmental science and biology students prepared for the 90 minute panel of experts with a presentation by Mark Seeley (University of Minnesota Extension), focused on historical weather trends and extreme weather incidents. Following this presentation, students created questions for the expert panel using data from Mark’s presentation, information from their coursework, and personal knowledge and interest. Nearly 100 students settled into the auditorium for the 90 minute Q&A session with local experts. The panel consisted of: Jennifer Biederman – Professor of Biology, Winona State University Kevin Kelleher – Business Development Specialist, MN Dept. of Employment & Economic Development Tex Hawkins – Sustainability Advisor, Winona State University Lynnea Pfohl – Policy Program Organizer, Land Stewardship Project Eric Barnard – Director of Outdoor Education, Winona State University While the panelists fielded questions relevant to their own expertise, citing statistics and professional understanding that comes from years of experience, they reminded the students that they have a voice “more powerful than ours as it more clearly represents the future.” Weess’ students will continue to engage in this conversation by writing letters to the editor, connecting with members of the community Climate Dialogue, and pursuing a local water quality restoration project, among other opportunities percolating. You can read more about the students’ work at: ruralclimatenetwork.org/content/rural-climate-dialogue-winona-mn
  • 14. 14 The Jefferson Center is a nonpartisan organization committed to strengthening democracy by advancing informed, citizen-led solutions to challenging public issues through deliberation and community action. We’re collaborating with governments, nonprofits, and others to unleash the power of citizens and solve today’s toughest challenges.Wefocusonbuildingpowerfulcoalitions,creatingmeaningfulopportunities for education and public deliberation, and empowering citizen-led action. The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy is a Minnesota-based nonprofit working locally and globally at the intersection of policy and practice to ensure fair and sustainable food, farm and trade systems and to foster vibrant, prosperous rural communities. We support rural communities through research, market development, and policy advocacy to address local challenges, including issues associated with extreme weather and a changing climate. The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy are in the process of identifying communities across Minnesota for future Climate Dialogues. If you are interested in hosting a Dialogue in your community, or would like to receive additional information, please contact: Andrew Rockway at arockway@jefferson-center.org / 651-209-7672 Anna Claussen at aclaussen@iatp.org / 612-870-3423 Hosting a Climate Dialogue requires significant engagement with community members months prior to the event in order to identify issues of principal concern, engage local and regional experts, work with community institutions to develop information sources, and determine community receptivity among policymakers and the general public to incorporate Dialogue findings into community planning efforts. INTERESTED IN YOUR OWN CLIMATE DIALOGUE? JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG @JEFFERSONCTR HELLO@JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG IATP.ORG @IATP ACLAUSSEN@IATP.ORG