SlideShare a Scribd company logo
CLIMATE
DIALOGUE
ITASCA
COUNTY
MAY 2015
2
RURAL
CLIMATE
DIALOGUES
Rural communities are at-risk to be seriously affected by both the direct impacts of a changing climate
(e.g. extreme weather) and by efforts to mitigate those changes. This is especially true in considering
solutions and policies that increase energy, resource, or transportation costs.
At the same time, much of the “production” in climate-sensitive economies will occur in rural areas,
including through renewable energy deployment, reinvigorated local and regional food economies, and
changes to land use patterns. Rural communities will and must play an integral role in addressing climate
issues.
Despite this significance, rural communities have often been overlooked in climate conversations;
political debate and policy changes have tended to emphasize urban and suburban perspectives. In many
communities, incomplete information and limited public participation have prevented sound, publicly-
supported policy from emerging.
But it doesn’t have to stay this way.
Rural residents and communities can develop innovative solutions that respond to local and regional
challenges to remain vibrant and prosperous. Recent research has shown that 85 percent of rural
Minnesotans feel that people like themselves can make an impact and improve local quality of life; 75
percent believe their community can work together across differences.
Drawing on this resilient attitude, rural communities – in conjunction with the Jefferson Center and the
Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy – are seeking to move conversations on climate change forward.
Climate Dialogues help rural communities think critically and plan strategically to address local challenges
related to weather and climate. To foster high-quality engagement, we use the time-tested Citizens
Jury method for community problem solving and leadership development. This approach—which brings
together a microcosm of the community to study an issue in-depth and generate a shared community
response—has consistently provided a productive, educational, and inclusive way to address complex,
divisive challenges.
The Itasca County Climate Dialogue is the second in a series of projects aimed at galvanizing rural citizens
to assert leadership and build resiliency in the face of extreme weather and changing climate conditions.
This Dialogue brought together a randomly selected but demographically balanced group of 18 citizens
from Itasca County in an intense, three-day moderated study and deliberation forum. They were
tasked with creating a shared, community-based response to changing weather conditions and extreme
weather events. Beyond that charge, the group was completely citizen-driven— no one told them what
to do or what to think. The panel had the liberty, information, and resources to produce their own
recommendations that respond to community needs, priorities, concerns, and values in order to maintain
and strengthen the resilience and prosperity of Itasca County. These recommendations will serve as a
starting point for community conversations on extreme weather and climate.
The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, along with our local partners,
will work to widely publicize the event and engage panelists and community members inspired by the
conversation to work on these issues as local leaders. We’ll continue to support the community as they
work to implement citizen recommendations.
The Rural Climate Dialogues help develop and amplify an informed voice of the people so that regional,
state, and national policymakers can take their needs into account when developing climate policy.
Through the expansion of this project, we hope to build better climate change policy and stronger, civic-
minded communities across rural Minnesota.
3
DIALOGUE PROCESS
DAY 1
»» Panelists meet one another and discuss goals and expectations for the 3
days
»» Panelists engage in a simulation exercise as an introduction to the process
of assessing information and working together to achieve shared results
»» Panelists determine what makes a question “good” for getting clear and
useful information
»» Presentation on local extreme weather and climate conditions by Mark
Seeley (University of Minnesota Extension)
»» Presentation by Brian Palik (USDA Forest Service)
DAY 2
»» Presentation by John Latimer (KAXE) on phenology and wildlife
»» Presentation by Tim Goeman (DNR) on fisheries
»» Presentation by Megan Christianson (Visit Grand Rapids)
»» Presentation by Julie Kennedy (City of Grand Rapids) on public infrastructure
»» Presentation by Michael Duval (DNR) on water resources
»» Group deliberation about all speakers
»» Presentation by Grand Rapids High School students
DAY 3
»» Panelists identify and select top challenges
»» Panelists identify and select top opportunities
»» Panelists identify top actions
»» Panelists write final statement in group editing process
Eighteen Itasca County citizens met at the Timberlake Lodge in Grand Rapids,
Minnesota for 3 days, 8:30am to 5:00pm, starting Thursday, May 14th and
concluding Saturday, May 16th. Participants were randomly selected and
stratified to include a balanced representation of the Itasca County population.
Participants were paid $375 plus expenses for the three days.
The group was tasked with deciding how Itasca County might best address
extreme weather and a changing climate in order to remain a healthy, resilient,
and prosperous community. To respond to this charge, community panelists
identified and prioritized significant challenges to the long-term prosperity of
the community, opportunities to respond to those challenges, and individual
and community actions to directly address challenges or realize opportunities.
Those challenges, opportunities, and actions, along with other important
outcomes from the three days, are highlighted in this report.
A detailed outline of the three day process is offered below.
4
STATEMENT FOR
OUR NEIGHBORS
KEY WEATHER AND CLIMATE FACTS
»» Climate is never constant, but our climate is
changing more rapidly than it ever has in our
measurement history.
»» The general character of Minnesota’s climate,
including in Itasca County, is experiencing
rising temperatures and more precipitation.
»» Precipitation is more often created during
thunderstorms. This creates larger geographic
disparities (areas where rain falls and where
it doesn’t), leading to a higher frequency of
drought. For example, a county can be in
drought and a declared flood zone at the same
time.
»» Grand Rapids has seen a 22% increase in
precipitation since the 1920-1951 average.
Precipitation has especially increased in the
last 3-4 decades.
»» We are seeing more extreme weather events
(heat waves and flash floods) in the last two
decades than in the previous period of climate
measurements, dating back to the 1840s.
From May 14-16, 2015, we came together as 18 residents of Itasca County to consider
changes in our weather and climate and the impacts of those changes on our economy,
tourist industry, public infrastructure, forests, fish and wildlife, and water resources.
Based on this experience and testimony from local subject matter experts, we created
the following report.
Evidence points to changing weather patterns, which will likely affect all of our lives in
some way. These changes will have a real measurable impact on our overall economy,
personal finances, health, and culture. The tourism, lumber, and outdoor life (fishing,
hunting, hiking, camping, etc.) components of our economy can adapt and thrive with
thoughtful long-term management.
We as individuals and communities have the power to take action by working together.
By doing so, we can improve our environment, save our natural resources, address the
effects of changing weather, and create more opportunities to make a more vibrant
community.
Change in average temperature from 1901-1960
period to 1991-2012 period. Graphic by Jaime Chismar
for Minnesota Public Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota
Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights
reserved. Data source: National Climate Assessment
5
1866-1965
Four mega-rains in 100 years
August 6, 1866
Killed 16 people in Fillmore
County.
July 17-19, 1867
Known as the state’s greatest flash
flood, in central Minnesota.
July 20-22, 1909
Extensive across northern
Minnesota, killed 2 children in
Duluth.
September 9-10, 1947
More than 8 inches in five hours at
Hibbing.
1966-1999
Three mega-rains in 33 years
July 21-22, 1972
Nearly 11 inches in 24 hours at Ft.
Ripley, a state record at the time.
June 28-29 and July 1-2, 1975
Intense rain in northwestern
Minnesota in two events.
July 23, 1987
9 inches at Minneapolis-St. Paul
International Airport, a record.
2000-2014
Five mega-rains in 14 years
June 9-10, 2002
More than 12 inches in 48 hours in
northern Minnesota.
September 14-15, 2004
More than 10 inches in 36 hours in
Faribault and Freeborn counties.
August 18-20, 2007
15 inches near Hokah, state record
for 24 hours.
September 22-23, 2010
More than 10 inches at Amboy.
June 19-20, 2012
7 inches in two day in Duluth, St.
Louis River at record level.
Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. ©2015 Minnesota
Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: Minnesota
Department of Natural Resources. State Climatology
Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public
Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota Public Radio.
Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data
source: Minnesota DNR
»» The mean values of nighttime
minimum temperatures are
increasing at twice the rate of
the mean values of daytime
maximums.
»» Tropical and more severe weather
is becoming more common further
north, leading to increasing heat
indices rather than just higher air
temperatures.
»» The change in weather and climate
affects the livelihood of residents
of Itasca County in many ways.
These changes influence not just
our economic livelihood, but
health, energy use, infrastructure,
and many other aspects of our life.
6
TOP CHALLENGES FOR ITASCA COUNTY
1.	 Extreme temperature variations and severe flooding conditions
reduce the life of capital assets and increase operational
disruptions for public infrastructure. We need to consider new
design standards for our stormwater systems to address larger
precipitation events and new regulations. There are significant
economic costs associated with future designs.
2.	 We need to emphasize management of natural resources from
a long-term perspective (such as 50 years or more) and use a
systems approach (recognizing that everything is interrelated)
to more effectively manage and protect natural resources and
ensure a legacy for future generations.
3.	 Stormwater runoff can increase sediment and phosphorus load in
waterways, which can reduce water quality.
4.	 Fish community composition is changing. This will affect angling
opportunity, Minnesota’s fishing economy, and our outdoor
culture.
5.	 We are experiencing vast temperature extremes (ex. early springs
followed by a cold snap) that affect the availability of food (shifts
in timing between plants blooming and insects emerging after
winter) and the prevalence of suitable habitat for some bird and
insect species, which threaten the populations of these species.
6.	 Emerald Ash Borer is expanding its territory into northern
Minnesota and Itasca County because of warmer winters. The
Emerald Ash Borer will wipe out our black ash forests, which
grow in wet areas that may not be suitable for replacement by
other tree species.
7.	 There will be less water and more water at different times,
because of changes in precipitation patterns and temperature.
8.	 The increasing prevalence of drought in summers reduces
the growth and health of pine forests that are overly dense.
Reduced growth and declining health in pine forests could
negatively impact the timber industry (due to declines in forest
productivity) and the tourism industry (due to decreasing
aesthetic quality).
9.	 The Itasca area will become less hospitable to certain tree species
and more favorable to others. This corresponds roughly to tree
habitat moving northeast.
10.	 More drastic weather conditions - rainy springs, dry summers,
unpredictable snow conditions - potentially mean fewer tourists
choosing to stay in Grand Rapids and Itasca County. Tourism is a
very important driver of local economic activity.
7
TOP OPPORTUNITIES FOR ITASCA COUNTY
1.	 We can manage forests so they’re more adaptable in the face of
changing conditions by pursuing the following strategies:
•	 Manage forests for diversity so that they contain their full array of native tree
species, some of which may be adapted to future climate conditions, and evaluate
tree species southwest of the Itasca area for suitability to future climate conditions.
•	 Thin overly dense pine forests on a regular basis to increase soil moisture and tree
growth, improve pine resistance and resilience against drought, and produce a
marketable supply of good-sized pines to timber mills.
•	 Address the potential loss of ash trees (due to Emerald Ash Borer) by managing
forests to ensure growth of new species, using small patch cutting to create
suitable habitat for new species, and by evaluating the species best suited to
replace ash trees.
2.	 Information is power. We can ensure information is accessible.
Decision-makers at all levels – including individuals, government,
and businesses – need to be informed and engaged concerning how
changes in climate affect our natural resources and economy. It’s
important to adapt present practices based on new information.
3.	 We can accept changes to natural systems and change the way we
manage these systems. One opportunity is to move natural resource
management into a long-term planning and sustainability mode,
which includes empowering citizen interests in the planning process
and being adaptive but realistic about changes.
4.	 To manage excessive water during extreme weather events, we can
reduce imperviousness and allow water to infiltrate into the ground;
we can adapt stormwater infrastructure to hold higher volumes; and
we can maintain riparian buffers and forest cover, using natural
features that slow or retain water.
5.	 To effectively manage water in times of drought, we can implement
water conservation measures to maximize the benefit of every drop
of water; we can prioritize water uses and allocations by identifying
the most important uses to maintain in a drought; and we can plan
water-consumptive development.
6.	 After a drastic weather event (which may deter tourism), we can
communicate correct information and get it out there in a timely
manner (like Visit Duluth after the 2012 storms and flooding).
7.	 We can protect and preserve habitat and food sources for bird and
insect populations.
8.	 We can market what we have, by marketing alternatives to snow (like
ice) during seasons with low snowfall.
9.	 To ensure public safety and reduce property damage during and after
extreme weather events, we can avoid developing in floodplains.
10.	 To protect and strengthen our infrastructure we can increase the life
of our capital investments and reduce operational disruptions.
8
For the full list of challenges, opportunities, actions, and other
resources, visit:
JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG/ITASCA
RURALCLIMATENETWORK.ORG/CONTENT/RURAL-CLIMATE-
DIALOGUE-ITASCA-COUNTY-MN
NECESSARY ACTIONS FOR ITASCA COUNTY
Individual Actions
»» We can change the way we manage our individual properties to protect wildlife
habitat and water quality:
•	 Create more natural or wild areas so that bird and insects have more habitat
•	 Build birdhouses to provide habitat for birds
•	 Leave dead trees and snags on our property (if they don’t threaten our structures)
•	 Plant flowers and native plants on our property (without diminishing our property values)
•	 Plant early blooming plants on our property to provide more food sources for insects
•	 Encourage attitude shifts away from highly manicured “Home and Garden Magazine” lawns
(which remove habitat for insects and birds and adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere to
maintain) to “wilder” properties
•	 Reduce or eliminate the use of pesticides to protect from insects
•	 Raise our own bees
•	 Address stormwater runoff and noncompliant septic systems (if you own waterfront property)
»» Actions by individuals add up! We can insulate our homes, use efficient bulbs
and appliances, use solar power, travel by bike, improve the fuel efficiency
of our vehicles, travel less, increase energy efficiency, and pursue alternative
energy sources.
»» We can participate in public decision-making meetings related our
infrastructure systems. Get involved by asking what you can do on your
property to address stormwater and infrastructure issues. To understand and
be involved in managing our public infrastructure, we can get educated on local
regulations, the latest research and trends, and the consequences of pursuing
different public policies; and we can share knowledge with our friends, peers,
and neighbors.
Community Actions
»» We can install green infrastructure to reduce stormwater runoff on new
developments. We can reduce risks associated with stormwater runoff by
pursuing low impact development best practices. We should educate our
public officials and our general public about balancing risks associated with
stormwater and the costs of managing stormwater. We should pay attention to
new data and research.
»» To ensure tourists come to Itasca County, we can be adaptive and focus on
what we have. We can create new reasons for tourists to come to Itasca County
if weather conditions don’t support traditional tourist activities.
»» To improve our infrastructure systems, we should be more creative and keep an
open mind, for example, by implementing green design ideas (e.g. new thermal
pavements that reduce damage related to severe fluctuations in temperature).
9
DEMOGRAPHIC
ITASCA COUNTY
PERCENTAGE
IDEAL # OF
PARTICIPANTS
ACTUAL #
OF PARTICIPANTS
GENDER
Female 50% 9 9
Male 50% 9 9
RACE/ETHNICITY
Caucasian/White 93% 16-17 17
Persons of Color/Multiracial 7% 1-2 1
PARTY AFFILIATION
Democrat 28% 5 4
No Party, Other 44% 8 10
Republican 28% 5 4
AGE
15-39 31% 6 5
40-64 45% 8 8
65 & over 24% 4 5
EDUCATION
Less than High School 7% 1-2 0
High School or GED 61% 10-11 10
Associate’s/Bachelor’s 25% 4-5 6
Graduate degree 7% 1-2 2
TOTAL NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS 100% 18 18
Invitations to participate in the Itasca County Climate Dialogue were sent to 5,000
randomly selected households in Itasca County. Interested citizens completed a
questionnaire with demographic information and were then added to a pool of
potential panelists. 18 panelists were selected from that pool, chosen anonymously to
match the demographics, as near as possible, of the county.
PANELIST DEMOGRAPHICS
10
PANELIST PERSPECTIVES
“It’s been a wonderful
adventure and I’m really
glad I was invited to
this. I really want to
compliment [the staff].
You guys are phenomenal
and you really know how
to make personalities
interact in a professional
way. You guys are
awesome. ”
“I really had no interest in
signing up - my wife signed me
up. But I came and I’m really glad
I came. It was good to see all the
different sides of the issue and
I learned a lot, too. I’ve got to
hand it to you guys - taking 18
people and trying to get all these
opinions, balanced opinions,
and facilitate this and channel
this group to come up with a
product in 3 short days, all things
considered, you did a great job.”
“My brain’s been frazzled a couple times, but I think
I learned a lot of things, things that I hadn’t thought
about. And I like to think that I have 17 new friends.”
“I learned a ton of information. I knew of climate change
but I really had no idea just how much it affected me
personally.”
11
GRAND RAPIDS HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENT DIALOGUE
We strive for demographic diversity and inclusion in all Climate Dialogues, including by
asking students to participate. Due to the timing of the Itasca Climate Dialogue, students
were unable to participate in the three-day May event. We decided instead to host a
compressed Climate Dialogue at the Grand Rapids High School. Brielle Carlson’s advanced
geography students and Shawn Linder’s agriculture and natural students participated in
a week long project studying and discussing the changes in climate and weather in Itasca
County. Students began by researching some of the impacts of changes in climate and
weather across Minnesota. Students then identified and invited local experts representing a
range of perspectives and backgrounds to discuss changes in Itasca County during a panel
Q&A session:
Bud Stone – President, Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce
Megan Christianson – Executive Director, Visit Grand Rapids
John Latimer – Phenologist, KAXE
David Roerick – Retired, US Forest Service
Perry Loegering - Grand Rapids Area Wildlife Manager, Department of Natural Resources
Brian Palik - Research Ecologist, US Forest Service
Harry Hutchins - Natural Resources Instructor, Itasca Community College
Jack Rajala – Rajala Companies
Before the expert panel session, students came up with a set of questions based on their
research and group deliberation. Students asked questions of the panel in a 2 hour assembly.
Students spent the next few days considering the speakers’ perspectives and researching
solutions to some of their top concerns. A group of students presented their findings to the
Itasca Climate Dialogue participants on May 15th.
You can read more about the students’ work at:
ruralclimatenetwork.org/content/rural-climate-dialogue-itasca-
county-mn
12
The Jefferson Center is a nonpartisan organization committed to strengthening
democracy by advancing informed, citizen-led solutions to challenging public issues
through deliberation and community action. We’re collaborating with governments,
nonprofits, and others to unleash the power of citizens and solve today’s toughest
challenges.Wefocusonbuildingpowerfulcoalitions,creatingmeaningfulopportunities
for education and public deliberation, and empowering citizen-led action.
The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy is a Minnesota-based nonprofit
working locally and globally at the intersection of policy and practice to ensure fair
and sustainable food, farm and trade systems and to foster vibrant, prosperous rural
communities. We support rural communities through research, market development,
and policy advocacy to address local challenges, including issues associated with
extreme weather and a changing climate.
The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy are in the
process of identifying communities across Minnesota for future Climate Dialogues. If
you are interested in hosting a Dialogue in your community, or would like to receive
additional information, please contact:
Andrew Rockway at arockway@jefferson-center.org / 651-209-7672
Anna Claussen at aclaussen@iatp.org / 612-870-3423
Hosting a Climate Dialogue requires significant engagement with community
members months prior to the event in order to identify issues of principal concern,
engage local and regional experts, work with community institutions to develop
information sources, and determine community receptivity among policymakers and
the general public to incorporate Dialogue findings into community planning efforts.
INTERESTED IN YOUR OWN CLIMATE DIALOGUE?
JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG
@JEFFERSONCTR
HELLO@JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG
IATP.ORG
@IATP
ACLAUSSEN@IATP.ORG

More Related Content

What's hot

Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_
Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_
Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_
Neil Joshi
 
Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345
Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345 Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345
Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345
Nicholas Niesen
 
11. poverty & environment; the linkages
11. poverty & environment; the linkages11. poverty & environment; the linkages
11. poverty & environment; the linkages
Dr. P.B.Dharmasena
 
POWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLD
POWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLDPOWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLD
POWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLD
Prashant Mehta
 
UEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And Climate
UEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And ClimateUEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And Climate
UEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And Climate
Ed Morrison
 
Rogerian Environmental Paper 2nd Draft
Rogerian Environmental Paper 2nd DraftRogerian Environmental Paper 2nd Draft
Rogerian Environmental Paper 2nd Draft
Raul Hernandez
 
Tobey at all.,2011
Tobey at all.,2011Tobey at all.,2011
Tobey at all.,2011
Wilbard Mkama
 
Social and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and Response
Social and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and ResponseSocial and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and Response
Social and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and Response
KateWS
 
Brundtland report
Brundtland reportBrundtland report
Brundtland report
ManfredNolte
 
The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...
The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...
The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...
NAAR Journal
 
Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...
Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...
Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...
ElisaMendelsohn
 
HPRU Flood Workshop_2015
HPRU Flood Workshop_2015HPRU Flood Workshop_2015
HPRU Flood Workshop_2015
KateWS
 
Susan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate Change
Susan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate ChangeSusan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate Change
Susan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate Change
Sahel_BeyondForestryLaws
 
Nisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation Plan
Nisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation PlanNisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation Plan
Nisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation Plan
Nisqually River Council
 
Perspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena Experience
Perspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena ExperiencePerspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena Experience
Perspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena Experience
Community Development Society
 
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation PlanHerrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
ELEEP Network
 
Private response, public response and climate futures
Private response, public response and climate futuresPrivate response, public response and climate futures
Private response, public response and climate futures
KateWS
 
Edith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable Development
Edith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable DevelopmentEdith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable Development
Edith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable Development
Preeti Sikder
 
The IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDER
The IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDERThe IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDER
The IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDER
Almaz Demessie
 
ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2
Mariah Harrod
 

What's hot (20)

Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_
Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_
Evaluating Sustainable Development in US Cities and States_finalpaper_
 
Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345
Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345 Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345
Loss of Biodiversity - ECO345
 
11. poverty & environment; the linkages
11. poverty & environment; the linkages11. poverty & environment; the linkages
11. poverty & environment; the linkages
 
POWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLD
POWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLDPOWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLD
POWER OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS IN GLOBALIZED WORLD
 
UEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And Climate
UEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And ClimateUEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And Climate
UEDA 2008 Univ Of Alaska Canary And Climate
 
Rogerian Environmental Paper 2nd Draft
Rogerian Environmental Paper 2nd DraftRogerian Environmental Paper 2nd Draft
Rogerian Environmental Paper 2nd Draft
 
Tobey at all.,2011
Tobey at all.,2011Tobey at all.,2011
Tobey at all.,2011
 
Social and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and Response
Social and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and ResponseSocial and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and Response
Social and Political Dynamics of Flood Risk, Recovery and Response
 
Brundtland report
Brundtland reportBrundtland report
Brundtland report
 
The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...
The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...
The adverse impact of ecosystem degradation and poor governance on marginaliz...
 
Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...
Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...
Enhancing Justice and Sustainability at the Local Level: Affordable Policies ...
 
HPRU Flood Workshop_2015
HPRU Flood Workshop_2015HPRU Flood Workshop_2015
HPRU Flood Workshop_2015
 
Susan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate Change
Susan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate ChangeSusan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate Change
Susan Karuti: Gender, Forestry and Climate Change
 
Nisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation Plan
Nisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation PlanNisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation Plan
Nisqually Forest and Water Climate Adaptation Plan
 
Perspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena Experience
Perspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena ExperiencePerspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena Experience
Perspectives on Tornado Recovery in a Small Town: The Wadena Experience
 
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation PlanHerrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
Herrmann, Victoria. (2017). The United States Climate Change Relocation Plan
 
Private response, public response and climate futures
Private response, public response and climate futuresPrivate response, public response and climate futures
Private response, public response and climate futures
 
Edith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable Development
Edith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable DevelopmentEdith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable Development
Edith Brown Weiss: In Fairness to Future Generations and Sustainable Development
 
The IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDER
The IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDERThe IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDER
The IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GENDER
 
ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2ENS 430 Essay 2
ENS 430 Essay 2
 

Similar to Rural Climate Dialogues: Itasca

Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
nado-web
 
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly WoloszynWorkshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Soil and Water Conservation Society
 
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly WoloszynClimate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Soil and Water Conservation Society
 
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climateSNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
American Planning Association - Massachusetts Chapter
 
Integrating Hazard Mitigation
Integrating Hazard MitigationIntegrating Hazard Mitigation
Integrating Hazard Mitigation
Illinois ResourceNet
 
Environment Protection Essay
Environment Protection EssayEnvironment Protection Essay
Environment Protection Essay
Paper Writing Service Cheap
 
Village disaster management plan
Village disaster management planVillage disaster management plan
Village disaster management plan
Pradeep Panda
 
Sustainable Cascadia
Sustainable CascadiaSustainable Cascadia
Sustainable Cascadia
sandrasaultpoulson
 
5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx
5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx
5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx
alinainglis
 
AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3
AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3
AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3
Young Christian Students Australia
 
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate ResilienceGender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
 
Global Environmental Issues
Global Environmental IssuesGlobal Environmental Issues
Global Environmental Issues
Megan Espinoza
 
Yakking About Fracking Camp.
Yakking About Fracking Camp.Yakking About Fracking Camp.
Yakking About Fracking Camp.
Nikki Fitzpatrick
 
April 2023
April 2023April 2023
April 2023
DinyahRein
 
April 2023
April 2023April 2023
April 2023
DinyahRein
 
Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010
Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010
Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010
lauraebrown
 
2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...
2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...
2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...
New England Chapter of the Congress for the New Urbanism
 
Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...
Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...
Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...
Gina Buck
 
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
Mill City Times
 
essay.docx
essay.docxessay.docx
essay.docx
HuonggiangNgo3
 

Similar to Rural Climate Dialogues: Itasca (20)

Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response Rural Climate Dialogues:  Developing a Citizen-Based Response
Rural Climate Dialogues: Developing a Citizen-Based Response
 
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly WoloszynWorkshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
Workshop 1 - Molly Woloszyn
 
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly WoloszynClimate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
Climate Collaboration WS - Molly Woloszyn
 
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climateSNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
SNEAPA 2013 Thursday b1 10_30_tomorrows climate
 
Integrating Hazard Mitigation
Integrating Hazard MitigationIntegrating Hazard Mitigation
Integrating Hazard Mitigation
 
Environment Protection Essay
Environment Protection EssayEnvironment Protection Essay
Environment Protection Essay
 
Village disaster management plan
Village disaster management planVillage disaster management plan
Village disaster management plan
 
Sustainable Cascadia
Sustainable CascadiaSustainable Cascadia
Sustainable Cascadia
 
5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx
5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx
5 Environmental Economics and Environmental PolicyUpon com.docx
 
AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3
AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3
AYCS Climate Justice Campaign Newsletter 3
 
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate ResilienceGender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
Gender, Social Change and Climate Resilience
 
Global Environmental Issues
Global Environmental IssuesGlobal Environmental Issues
Global Environmental Issues
 
Yakking About Fracking Camp.
Yakking About Fracking Camp.Yakking About Fracking Camp.
Yakking About Fracking Camp.
 
April 2023
April 2023April 2023
April 2023
 
April 2023
April 2023April 2023
April 2023
 
Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010
Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010
Introduction to sustainability principles 101 june 2 2010
 
2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...
2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...
2017 Urbanism Summit 4B | Climate & Resiliency: Local Perspectives for a Glob...
 
Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...
Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...
Environmental Sustainability At The World, Massachusetts...
 
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WATERS - Environmental Initiative Policy ...
 
essay.docx
essay.docxessay.docx
essay.docx
 

More from Jefferson Center

Steven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy FutureSteven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy Future
Jefferson Center
 
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart MunicipalityCity of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
Jefferson Center
 
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy PrimerMorris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Jefferson Center
 
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum ReportTwin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
Jefferson Center
 
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic ErrorClearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Jefferson Center
 
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Jefferson Center
 
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Jefferson Center
 
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Jefferson Center
 
Jefferson center annual report 2016
Jefferson center   annual report 2016Jefferson center   annual report 2016
Jefferson center annual report 2016
Jefferson Center
 

More from Jefferson Center (9)

Steven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy FutureSteven's County Energy Future
Steven's County Energy Future
 
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart MunicipalityCity of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
City of Morris, Minnesota: Climate Smart Municipality
 
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy PrimerMorris, Minnesota Energy Primer
Morris, Minnesota Energy Primer
 
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum ReportTwin Cities Election Forum Report
Twin Cities Election Forum Report
 
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic ErrorClearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
Clearing the Error: Patient Participation in Reducing Diagnostic Error
 
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
Informed Citizen Akron Report #3: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage ...
 
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #2: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
 
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
Informed Citizen Akron #1: Improving Candidate-Focused Media Coverage in the ...
 
Jefferson center annual report 2016
Jefferson center   annual report 2016Jefferson center   annual report 2016
Jefferson center annual report 2016
 

Recently uploaded

Call Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service Hyderabad
Call Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service HyderabadCall Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service Hyderabad
Call Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service Hyderabad
namratasinha41
 
Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service BangaloreCall Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
namratasinha41
 
A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...
A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...
A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...
Aussie Hydro-Vac Services
 
21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx
21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx
21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx
JustineGarcia32
 
Monitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation data
Monitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation dataMonitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation data
Monitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation data
Spatial Genetics
 
一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理
7kvwgv0y
 
Call Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service Kolkata
Call Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service KolkataCall Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service Kolkata
Call Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service Kolkata
namratasinha41
 
一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理
yfvet
 
Notes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental laws
Notes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental lawsNotes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental laws
Notes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental laws
sforsidd
 
SOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptx
SOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptxSOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptx
SOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptx
anmolbansal1969
 
一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理
yfvet
 
学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样
学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样
学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样
ehfyqtu
 
一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理
twqryq79
 
Emerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food production
Emerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food productionEmerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food production
Emerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food production
CIFOR-ICRAF
 
一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理
lyurzi7r
 
按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理
按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理
按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理
xeexm
 
Mass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptx
Mass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptxMass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptx
Mass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptx
SwastikBhattacharjya
 
Vip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Vip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service BangaloreVip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Vip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
sachinkumarji156
 
Call Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls Dehradun
Call Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls DehradunCall Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls Dehradun
Call Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls Dehradun
teenagarg #v08
 
Lessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approaches
Lessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approachesLessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approaches
Lessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approaches
CIFOR-ICRAF
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Call Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service Hyderabad
Call Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service HyderabadCall Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service Hyderabad
Call Girls Hyderabad 7023059433 Independent Call Girl Service Hyderabad
 
Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service BangaloreCall Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
 
A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...
A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...
A Comprehensive Guide on Cable Location Services Detections Method, Tools, an...
 
21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx
21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx
21321321321sfsdfdsfsdfsdfsfddsfppt ai.pptx
 
Monitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation data
Monitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation dataMonitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation data
Monitor indicators of genetic diversity from space using Earth Observation data
 
一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国堪萨斯大学毕业证(KU学位证)如何办理
 
Call Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service Kolkata
Call Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service KolkataCall Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service Kolkata
Call Girls Kolkata 7339748667 Independent Call Girl Service Kolkata
 
一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国迈阿密大学毕业证如何办理
 
Notes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental laws
Notes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental lawsNotes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental laws
Notes on National Green Tribunal, Environmental laws
 
SOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptx
SOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptxSOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptx
SOIL AND ITS FORMATION bjbhjbhvhvhjvhj .pptx
 
一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理
一比一原版美国南加州大学毕业证如何办理
 
学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样
学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样
学校原版(unuk学位证书)英国牛津布鲁克斯大学毕业证硕士文凭原版一模一样
 
一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国加州大学欧文分校毕业证(uci学位证)如何办理
 
Emerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food production
Emerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food productionEmerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food production
Emerging Earth Observation methods for monitoring sustainable food production
 
一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理
一比一原版美国亚利桑那大学毕业证(ua学位证)如何办理
 
按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理
按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理
按照学校原版(UAL文凭证书)伦敦艺术大学毕业证快速办理
 
Mass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptx
Mass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptxMass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptx
Mass Production of Trichogramma sp..pptx
 
Vip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Vip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service BangaloreVip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
Vip Call Girls Bangalore 9024918724 Independent Call Girl Service Bangalore
 
Call Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls Dehradun
Call Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls DehradunCall Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls Dehradun
Call Girls Dehradun +91-8094342248 Vip Call Girls Dehradun
 
Lessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approaches
Lessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approachesLessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approaches
Lessons from operationalizing integrated landscape approaches
 

Rural Climate Dialogues: Itasca

  • 2. 2 RURAL CLIMATE DIALOGUES Rural communities are at-risk to be seriously affected by both the direct impacts of a changing climate (e.g. extreme weather) and by efforts to mitigate those changes. This is especially true in considering solutions and policies that increase energy, resource, or transportation costs. At the same time, much of the “production” in climate-sensitive economies will occur in rural areas, including through renewable energy deployment, reinvigorated local and regional food economies, and changes to land use patterns. Rural communities will and must play an integral role in addressing climate issues. Despite this significance, rural communities have often been overlooked in climate conversations; political debate and policy changes have tended to emphasize urban and suburban perspectives. In many communities, incomplete information and limited public participation have prevented sound, publicly- supported policy from emerging. But it doesn’t have to stay this way. Rural residents and communities can develop innovative solutions that respond to local and regional challenges to remain vibrant and prosperous. Recent research has shown that 85 percent of rural Minnesotans feel that people like themselves can make an impact and improve local quality of life; 75 percent believe their community can work together across differences. Drawing on this resilient attitude, rural communities – in conjunction with the Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy – are seeking to move conversations on climate change forward. Climate Dialogues help rural communities think critically and plan strategically to address local challenges related to weather and climate. To foster high-quality engagement, we use the time-tested Citizens Jury method for community problem solving and leadership development. This approach—which brings together a microcosm of the community to study an issue in-depth and generate a shared community response—has consistently provided a productive, educational, and inclusive way to address complex, divisive challenges. The Itasca County Climate Dialogue is the second in a series of projects aimed at galvanizing rural citizens to assert leadership and build resiliency in the face of extreme weather and changing climate conditions. This Dialogue brought together a randomly selected but demographically balanced group of 18 citizens from Itasca County in an intense, three-day moderated study and deliberation forum. They were tasked with creating a shared, community-based response to changing weather conditions and extreme weather events. Beyond that charge, the group was completely citizen-driven— no one told them what to do or what to think. The panel had the liberty, information, and resources to produce their own recommendations that respond to community needs, priorities, concerns, and values in order to maintain and strengthen the resilience and prosperity of Itasca County. These recommendations will serve as a starting point for community conversations on extreme weather and climate. The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, along with our local partners, will work to widely publicize the event and engage panelists and community members inspired by the conversation to work on these issues as local leaders. We’ll continue to support the community as they work to implement citizen recommendations. The Rural Climate Dialogues help develop and amplify an informed voice of the people so that regional, state, and national policymakers can take their needs into account when developing climate policy. Through the expansion of this project, we hope to build better climate change policy and stronger, civic- minded communities across rural Minnesota.
  • 3. 3 DIALOGUE PROCESS DAY 1 »» Panelists meet one another and discuss goals and expectations for the 3 days »» Panelists engage in a simulation exercise as an introduction to the process of assessing information and working together to achieve shared results »» Panelists determine what makes a question “good” for getting clear and useful information »» Presentation on local extreme weather and climate conditions by Mark Seeley (University of Minnesota Extension) »» Presentation by Brian Palik (USDA Forest Service) DAY 2 »» Presentation by John Latimer (KAXE) on phenology and wildlife »» Presentation by Tim Goeman (DNR) on fisheries »» Presentation by Megan Christianson (Visit Grand Rapids) »» Presentation by Julie Kennedy (City of Grand Rapids) on public infrastructure »» Presentation by Michael Duval (DNR) on water resources »» Group deliberation about all speakers »» Presentation by Grand Rapids High School students DAY 3 »» Panelists identify and select top challenges »» Panelists identify and select top opportunities »» Panelists identify top actions »» Panelists write final statement in group editing process Eighteen Itasca County citizens met at the Timberlake Lodge in Grand Rapids, Minnesota for 3 days, 8:30am to 5:00pm, starting Thursday, May 14th and concluding Saturday, May 16th. Participants were randomly selected and stratified to include a balanced representation of the Itasca County population. Participants were paid $375 plus expenses for the three days. The group was tasked with deciding how Itasca County might best address extreme weather and a changing climate in order to remain a healthy, resilient, and prosperous community. To respond to this charge, community panelists identified and prioritized significant challenges to the long-term prosperity of the community, opportunities to respond to those challenges, and individual and community actions to directly address challenges or realize opportunities. Those challenges, opportunities, and actions, along with other important outcomes from the three days, are highlighted in this report. A detailed outline of the three day process is offered below.
  • 4. 4 STATEMENT FOR OUR NEIGHBORS KEY WEATHER AND CLIMATE FACTS »» Climate is never constant, but our climate is changing more rapidly than it ever has in our measurement history. »» The general character of Minnesota’s climate, including in Itasca County, is experiencing rising temperatures and more precipitation. »» Precipitation is more often created during thunderstorms. This creates larger geographic disparities (areas where rain falls and where it doesn’t), leading to a higher frequency of drought. For example, a county can be in drought and a declared flood zone at the same time. »» Grand Rapids has seen a 22% increase in precipitation since the 1920-1951 average. Precipitation has especially increased in the last 3-4 decades. »» We are seeing more extreme weather events (heat waves and flash floods) in the last two decades than in the previous period of climate measurements, dating back to the 1840s. From May 14-16, 2015, we came together as 18 residents of Itasca County to consider changes in our weather and climate and the impacts of those changes on our economy, tourist industry, public infrastructure, forests, fish and wildlife, and water resources. Based on this experience and testimony from local subject matter experts, we created the following report. Evidence points to changing weather patterns, which will likely affect all of our lives in some way. These changes will have a real measurable impact on our overall economy, personal finances, health, and culture. The tourism, lumber, and outdoor life (fishing, hunting, hiking, camping, etc.) components of our economy can adapt and thrive with thoughtful long-term management. We as individuals and communities have the power to take action by working together. By doing so, we can improve our environment, save our natural resources, address the effects of changing weather, and create more opportunities to make a more vibrant community. Change in average temperature from 1901-1960 period to 1991-2012 period. Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: National Climate Assessment
  • 5. 5 1866-1965 Four mega-rains in 100 years August 6, 1866 Killed 16 people in Fillmore County. July 17-19, 1867 Known as the state’s greatest flash flood, in central Minnesota. July 20-22, 1909 Extensive across northern Minnesota, killed 2 children in Duluth. September 9-10, 1947 More than 8 inches in five hours at Hibbing. 1966-1999 Three mega-rains in 33 years July 21-22, 1972 Nearly 11 inches in 24 hours at Ft. Ripley, a state record at the time. June 28-29 and July 1-2, 1975 Intense rain in northwestern Minnesota in two events. July 23, 1987 9 inches at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, a record. 2000-2014 Five mega-rains in 14 years June 9-10, 2002 More than 12 inches in 48 hours in northern Minnesota. September 14-15, 2004 More than 10 inches in 36 hours in Faribault and Freeborn counties. August 18-20, 2007 15 inches near Hokah, state record for 24 hours. September 22-23, 2010 More than 10 inches at Amboy. June 19-20, 2012 7 inches in two day in Duluth, St. Louis River at record level. Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. ©2015 Minnesota Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. State Climatology Graphic by Jaime Chismar for Minnesota Public Radio News. © 2015 Minnesota Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Data source: Minnesota DNR »» The mean values of nighttime minimum temperatures are increasing at twice the rate of the mean values of daytime maximums. »» Tropical and more severe weather is becoming more common further north, leading to increasing heat indices rather than just higher air temperatures. »» The change in weather and climate affects the livelihood of residents of Itasca County in many ways. These changes influence not just our economic livelihood, but health, energy use, infrastructure, and many other aspects of our life.
  • 6. 6 TOP CHALLENGES FOR ITASCA COUNTY 1. Extreme temperature variations and severe flooding conditions reduce the life of capital assets and increase operational disruptions for public infrastructure. We need to consider new design standards for our stormwater systems to address larger precipitation events and new regulations. There are significant economic costs associated with future designs. 2. We need to emphasize management of natural resources from a long-term perspective (such as 50 years or more) and use a systems approach (recognizing that everything is interrelated) to more effectively manage and protect natural resources and ensure a legacy for future generations. 3. Stormwater runoff can increase sediment and phosphorus load in waterways, which can reduce water quality. 4. Fish community composition is changing. This will affect angling opportunity, Minnesota’s fishing economy, and our outdoor culture. 5. We are experiencing vast temperature extremes (ex. early springs followed by a cold snap) that affect the availability of food (shifts in timing between plants blooming and insects emerging after winter) and the prevalence of suitable habitat for some bird and insect species, which threaten the populations of these species. 6. Emerald Ash Borer is expanding its territory into northern Minnesota and Itasca County because of warmer winters. The Emerald Ash Borer will wipe out our black ash forests, which grow in wet areas that may not be suitable for replacement by other tree species. 7. There will be less water and more water at different times, because of changes in precipitation patterns and temperature. 8. The increasing prevalence of drought in summers reduces the growth and health of pine forests that are overly dense. Reduced growth and declining health in pine forests could negatively impact the timber industry (due to declines in forest productivity) and the tourism industry (due to decreasing aesthetic quality). 9. The Itasca area will become less hospitable to certain tree species and more favorable to others. This corresponds roughly to tree habitat moving northeast. 10. More drastic weather conditions - rainy springs, dry summers, unpredictable snow conditions - potentially mean fewer tourists choosing to stay in Grand Rapids and Itasca County. Tourism is a very important driver of local economic activity.
  • 7. 7 TOP OPPORTUNITIES FOR ITASCA COUNTY 1. We can manage forests so they’re more adaptable in the face of changing conditions by pursuing the following strategies: • Manage forests for diversity so that they contain their full array of native tree species, some of which may be adapted to future climate conditions, and evaluate tree species southwest of the Itasca area for suitability to future climate conditions. • Thin overly dense pine forests on a regular basis to increase soil moisture and tree growth, improve pine resistance and resilience against drought, and produce a marketable supply of good-sized pines to timber mills. • Address the potential loss of ash trees (due to Emerald Ash Borer) by managing forests to ensure growth of new species, using small patch cutting to create suitable habitat for new species, and by evaluating the species best suited to replace ash trees. 2. Information is power. We can ensure information is accessible. Decision-makers at all levels – including individuals, government, and businesses – need to be informed and engaged concerning how changes in climate affect our natural resources and economy. It’s important to adapt present practices based on new information. 3. We can accept changes to natural systems and change the way we manage these systems. One opportunity is to move natural resource management into a long-term planning and sustainability mode, which includes empowering citizen interests in the planning process and being adaptive but realistic about changes. 4. To manage excessive water during extreme weather events, we can reduce imperviousness and allow water to infiltrate into the ground; we can adapt stormwater infrastructure to hold higher volumes; and we can maintain riparian buffers and forest cover, using natural features that slow or retain water. 5. To effectively manage water in times of drought, we can implement water conservation measures to maximize the benefit of every drop of water; we can prioritize water uses and allocations by identifying the most important uses to maintain in a drought; and we can plan water-consumptive development. 6. After a drastic weather event (which may deter tourism), we can communicate correct information and get it out there in a timely manner (like Visit Duluth after the 2012 storms and flooding). 7. We can protect and preserve habitat and food sources for bird and insect populations. 8. We can market what we have, by marketing alternatives to snow (like ice) during seasons with low snowfall. 9. To ensure public safety and reduce property damage during and after extreme weather events, we can avoid developing in floodplains. 10. To protect and strengthen our infrastructure we can increase the life of our capital investments and reduce operational disruptions.
  • 8. 8 For the full list of challenges, opportunities, actions, and other resources, visit: JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG/ITASCA RURALCLIMATENETWORK.ORG/CONTENT/RURAL-CLIMATE- DIALOGUE-ITASCA-COUNTY-MN NECESSARY ACTIONS FOR ITASCA COUNTY Individual Actions »» We can change the way we manage our individual properties to protect wildlife habitat and water quality: • Create more natural or wild areas so that bird and insects have more habitat • Build birdhouses to provide habitat for birds • Leave dead trees and snags on our property (if they don’t threaten our structures) • Plant flowers and native plants on our property (without diminishing our property values) • Plant early blooming plants on our property to provide more food sources for insects • Encourage attitude shifts away from highly manicured “Home and Garden Magazine” lawns (which remove habitat for insects and birds and adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere to maintain) to “wilder” properties • Reduce or eliminate the use of pesticides to protect from insects • Raise our own bees • Address stormwater runoff and noncompliant septic systems (if you own waterfront property) »» Actions by individuals add up! We can insulate our homes, use efficient bulbs and appliances, use solar power, travel by bike, improve the fuel efficiency of our vehicles, travel less, increase energy efficiency, and pursue alternative energy sources. »» We can participate in public decision-making meetings related our infrastructure systems. Get involved by asking what you can do on your property to address stormwater and infrastructure issues. To understand and be involved in managing our public infrastructure, we can get educated on local regulations, the latest research and trends, and the consequences of pursuing different public policies; and we can share knowledge with our friends, peers, and neighbors. Community Actions »» We can install green infrastructure to reduce stormwater runoff on new developments. We can reduce risks associated with stormwater runoff by pursuing low impact development best practices. We should educate our public officials and our general public about balancing risks associated with stormwater and the costs of managing stormwater. We should pay attention to new data and research. »» To ensure tourists come to Itasca County, we can be adaptive and focus on what we have. We can create new reasons for tourists to come to Itasca County if weather conditions don’t support traditional tourist activities. »» To improve our infrastructure systems, we should be more creative and keep an open mind, for example, by implementing green design ideas (e.g. new thermal pavements that reduce damage related to severe fluctuations in temperature).
  • 9. 9 DEMOGRAPHIC ITASCA COUNTY PERCENTAGE IDEAL # OF PARTICIPANTS ACTUAL # OF PARTICIPANTS GENDER Female 50% 9 9 Male 50% 9 9 RACE/ETHNICITY Caucasian/White 93% 16-17 17 Persons of Color/Multiracial 7% 1-2 1 PARTY AFFILIATION Democrat 28% 5 4 No Party, Other 44% 8 10 Republican 28% 5 4 AGE 15-39 31% 6 5 40-64 45% 8 8 65 & over 24% 4 5 EDUCATION Less than High School 7% 1-2 0 High School or GED 61% 10-11 10 Associate’s/Bachelor’s 25% 4-5 6 Graduate degree 7% 1-2 2 TOTAL NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS 100% 18 18 Invitations to participate in the Itasca County Climate Dialogue were sent to 5,000 randomly selected households in Itasca County. Interested citizens completed a questionnaire with demographic information and were then added to a pool of potential panelists. 18 panelists were selected from that pool, chosen anonymously to match the demographics, as near as possible, of the county. PANELIST DEMOGRAPHICS
  • 10. 10 PANELIST PERSPECTIVES “It’s been a wonderful adventure and I’m really glad I was invited to this. I really want to compliment [the staff]. You guys are phenomenal and you really know how to make personalities interact in a professional way. You guys are awesome. ” “I really had no interest in signing up - my wife signed me up. But I came and I’m really glad I came. It was good to see all the different sides of the issue and I learned a lot, too. I’ve got to hand it to you guys - taking 18 people and trying to get all these opinions, balanced opinions, and facilitate this and channel this group to come up with a product in 3 short days, all things considered, you did a great job.” “My brain’s been frazzled a couple times, but I think I learned a lot of things, things that I hadn’t thought about. And I like to think that I have 17 new friends.” “I learned a ton of information. I knew of climate change but I really had no idea just how much it affected me personally.”
  • 11. 11 GRAND RAPIDS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT DIALOGUE We strive for demographic diversity and inclusion in all Climate Dialogues, including by asking students to participate. Due to the timing of the Itasca Climate Dialogue, students were unable to participate in the three-day May event. We decided instead to host a compressed Climate Dialogue at the Grand Rapids High School. Brielle Carlson’s advanced geography students and Shawn Linder’s agriculture and natural students participated in a week long project studying and discussing the changes in climate and weather in Itasca County. Students began by researching some of the impacts of changes in climate and weather across Minnesota. Students then identified and invited local experts representing a range of perspectives and backgrounds to discuss changes in Itasca County during a panel Q&A session: Bud Stone – President, Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce Megan Christianson – Executive Director, Visit Grand Rapids John Latimer – Phenologist, KAXE David Roerick – Retired, US Forest Service Perry Loegering - Grand Rapids Area Wildlife Manager, Department of Natural Resources Brian Palik - Research Ecologist, US Forest Service Harry Hutchins - Natural Resources Instructor, Itasca Community College Jack Rajala – Rajala Companies Before the expert panel session, students came up with a set of questions based on their research and group deliberation. Students asked questions of the panel in a 2 hour assembly. Students spent the next few days considering the speakers’ perspectives and researching solutions to some of their top concerns. A group of students presented their findings to the Itasca Climate Dialogue participants on May 15th. You can read more about the students’ work at: ruralclimatenetwork.org/content/rural-climate-dialogue-itasca- county-mn
  • 12. 12 The Jefferson Center is a nonpartisan organization committed to strengthening democracy by advancing informed, citizen-led solutions to challenging public issues through deliberation and community action. We’re collaborating with governments, nonprofits, and others to unleash the power of citizens and solve today’s toughest challenges.Wefocusonbuildingpowerfulcoalitions,creatingmeaningfulopportunities for education and public deliberation, and empowering citizen-led action. The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy is a Minnesota-based nonprofit working locally and globally at the intersection of policy and practice to ensure fair and sustainable food, farm and trade systems and to foster vibrant, prosperous rural communities. We support rural communities through research, market development, and policy advocacy to address local challenges, including issues associated with extreme weather and a changing climate. The Jefferson Center and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy are in the process of identifying communities across Minnesota for future Climate Dialogues. If you are interested in hosting a Dialogue in your community, or would like to receive additional information, please contact: Andrew Rockway at arockway@jefferson-center.org / 651-209-7672 Anna Claussen at aclaussen@iatp.org / 612-870-3423 Hosting a Climate Dialogue requires significant engagement with community members months prior to the event in order to identify issues of principal concern, engage local and regional experts, work with community institutions to develop information sources, and determine community receptivity among policymakers and the general public to incorporate Dialogue findings into community planning efforts. INTERESTED IN YOUR OWN CLIMATE DIALOGUE? JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG @JEFFERSONCTR HELLO@JEFFERSON-CENTER.ORG IATP.ORG @IATP ACLAUSSEN@IATP.ORG