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Cellulitis

this topic describes indetail regarding the cellulitis, its causes and the management

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Cellulitis

  1. 1. Cellulitis By Mr. M. Shivananda Reddy
  2. 2. Cellulitis: • An acute spreading bacterial infection below the surface of the skin characterized by redness (erythema), warmth, swelling, and pain. • Cellulitis occurs when an entry point through normal skin barriers allows bacteria to enter and release their toxins in the subcutaneous tissues.
  3. 3. Etiology • Break in the skin from an abrasion, a cut, or a skin ulcer. • Local trauma, such as an animal bite. • Bacteremic spread of infection - bacteria arriving from a distant source via the bloodstream. Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci are usual causative agents.
  4. 4. Pathophysiology • Break in the skin, such as a fissure, cut, laceration, insect bite, or puncture wound causes entry of bacteria into the subcutaneous tissue. • Deep inflammation of subcutaneous tissue from enzymes produced by bacteria.
  5. 5. Signs And Symptoms • Fever • Chills • Erythema • Swelling • Local tenderness and pain • Malaise. • Regional lymphnodes may also be tender and enlarged(lymphadenopathy).
  6. 6. Diagnosis • History collection • Physical examination • CBC • Culture and sensitivity
  7. 7. Management • Mild cases of cellulitis can be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotic therapy with Dicloxacillin, Amoxicillin, or Cephalexin • If the cellulitis is severe, the patient is hospitalized and treated with intravenous antibiotics for at least 7 to 14 days. • Immobilize the part and elevate the extremity above the level of heart • Provide moist heat to promote wound healing
  8. 8. Complications: • Blood infection (septicaemia) • Bone infection (osteomyelitis) • Inflammation of the lymph vessels (lymphangitis) • Inflammation of the heart (endocarditis) • Meningitis • Shock • Tissue death (gangrene)

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