Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Maya Nissim: 2013 Sandia Wind Plant Reliability Workshop

1,241 views

Published on

Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective

Published in: Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

Maya Nissim: 2013 Sandia Wind Plant Reliability Workshop

  1. 1. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective An overarching strategy for maintaining blades including suggested timelines, methods, procedures, and tools to inspect, document, maintain, and repair blades. Maya Nissim Turbine Performance Engineer, EDP Renewables August 13, 2013
  2. 2. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 2 • EDP Renewables North America LLC develops, constructs, owns, and operates wind farms throughout North America • 3rd largest renewable operator in the US and ranked 4th in net installed capacity • Currently operating over 3,800 MW at 29 wind farms in 11 states with more than 2,100 turbines in operation and approximately 66 million hours of operational history • Headquartered in Houston, Texas • Performance Engineering group part of Asset Operations & responsible for: • Continuous improvement of turbine & main component performance & reliability • Fault reduction • Predictive maintenance • Root cause analysis • Failure trending and projections • Component repair specifications About EDP Renewables North America 1
  3. 3. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 3 Blade Maintenance 2
  4. 4. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 4 Problem Statement: WTG blades are a vital main component whose role is to extract energy from the wind in order to ultimately generate electricity. It is a valid assumption that blade damage has major impact on our fleet performance and ability to achieve its production potential in forms of turbine efficiency, downtime and cost of the major component repairs and replacements. Objective: Develop an overarching Asset Operations strategy for maintaining blades in EDPR’s fleet, including suggested timelines, methods, procedures and tools to inspect, document, maintain, and repair blades Criteria: The recommended strategy must be cost-effective and lead to long-term savings. Motivation Blade Maintenance Program Development 2
  5. 5. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 5 Why? When? How? Need to answer 3 basic Questions Blade Maintenance Program Considerations 2
  6. 6. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 6 Why? Explore the assumption that preventative & proactive maintenance of blades will benefit the company •Economics of blade maintenance •Historic blade failure rates & cost analysis •Summary of known blade damage to-date Considerations, Why? 2 When? •Inspection/maintenance timeframe & frequency How? •Possible Resources •Up-tower vs. down-tower; visual vs. physical •SOP & Change Management Process •Measure Success
  7. 7. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 7 Why? Explore the assumption that preventative & proactive maintenance of blades will benefit the company •Economics of blade maintenance •Historic blade failure rates & cost analysis •Summary of known blade damage to-date Considerations, When? 2 When? •Inspection/maintenance timeframe & frequency How? •Possible Resources •Up-tower vs. down-tower; visual vs. physical •SOP & Change Management Process •Measure Success
  8. 8. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 8 Why? Explore the assumption that preventative & proactive maintenance of blades will benefit the company •Economics of blade maintenance •Historic blade failure rates & cost analysis •Summary of known blade damage to-date Considerations, How? 2 When? •Inspection/maintenance timeframe & frequency How? •Possible Resources •Up-tower vs. down-tower; visual vs. physical •SOP & Change Management Process •Measure Success
  9. 9. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 9 Blade Data Inputs 3 Blade Maintenance Program Independent Observations EOW Inspections Lightning Events Database Determine blades to inspect Determine blades to inspect Vaisala lightning data Generate inspection report and email request Site inspects all blades on specified turbine 3rd party inspects specified blades 3rd party inspects specified blades 3rd party creates inspection report 3rd party creates inspection report Site inspection report generated Sites inspect blades of specified turbine Site inspection report generated
  10. 10. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 10 Goal is to maintain uniform & consistent categorization Blade Damage Severity Rating 3 Cat 5 Cat 4 Cat 3Cat 2
  11. 11. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 11 Overview of blade failure downtime data & typical blade damage types* Historical Blade Data 3 Blade Failure Mode Frequency Trailing Edge Blade Shell (general) Spar Blade Root Leading Edge *Data taken from EDPR’s offline turbine database so only captures turbines that were taken offline for the respective blade issues and thus does not necessarily capture all issues present on running turbines.
  12. 12. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 12 Trailing Edge Split tip, lightning damage, impact, damage during transport, de-bonding Trailing Edge Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 1135%
  13. 13. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 13 Blade Shell (general) Delamination (impact), de-bonding, EWV, lightning to shell Blade Shell (general) Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 1327%
  14. 14. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 14 Other/Unknown Most due to ice/storm conditions on blades, rest due to large corrective actions Other/Unknown Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 3215%
  15. 15. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 15 Spar Carbon fiber damage due to lightning &/or manufacturing defect Spar Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 249%
  16. 16. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 16 LPS Blown receptors, burnt cable, missing or crooked receptors LPS Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 66%
  17. 17. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 17 Blade Root Root crack, transverse crack Blade Root Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 106%
  18. 18. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 18 Leading Edge LE bond line cracks, LE erosion Leading Edge Examples Historical Blade Damage 3 192%
  19. 19. Blade Maintenance for Reliability, an Owner/Operator Perspective 19 Concluding Remarks 4 EDPR’s goals for the long term performance and care of our rotor blades: • Proactive annual visual inspection of a percentage of blades • Uniform & consistent damage categorization scale • Documentation of all findings • Prioritize repair of blades found to have damage and conduct at optimal time to avoid catastrophic failure • Proactive lightning inspections • Prescription of “next steps” (i.e. re-inspection interval, repair) • Continuously seek to improve the life of our blades by performing maintenance as needed as well as proactively seek new methods for protecting them from excessive wear
  20. 20. Thank You!

×