Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Sandia 2014 Wind Turbine Blade Workshop- Malkin

6,453 views

Published on

Sandia 2014 Wind Turbine Blade Workshop- Malkin

Published in: Engineering
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Sandia 2014 Wind Turbine Blade Workshop- Malkin

  1. 1. DNV GL © 2014 27 August 2014 SAFER, SMARTER, GREENER 27 August 2014 Matt Malkin and Dayton Griffin ENERGY Blade Reliability Trends 1 A 4-year update to Lessons Learned from Recent Blade Failures 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop
  2. 2. DNV GL © 2014 27 August 2014 2 The 2014 Update: Motivation Blade failures are rare, potentially high consequence events, and they continue to occur. We want to move blades to the distant background as a risk item for turbine operations. Site suitability analysis vs. failure investigation: Are we missing something? In short: Lessons learned in 2010 still generally hold true… with a few specific updates.
  3. 3. DNV GL © 2014 27 August 2014 3 Lessons Learned: 2014 Updates Cause of blade failure Manufacturing defect Progressive damage Distortion of blade sections Excessive loads due to system dynamics Excessive loads due to environmental conditions Wrinkles Bonds Lots of touch labor Ramps in production rates Quality of quality systems Pushing process-related limits Ultrasonic NDT has been in use for >10 years ”Bulging/breathing” effect, mostly in root transition region, due to blade loading Lightning moves up in priority. Lightning damage continues, even with updates to LPS designs and retrofits. Low specific ratings and finely tuned turbine siting. Resonant phenomena: analytical needs push the limits of current capability to accurately capture effects of vortex-induced vibration (parked or idling rotor) Initiating from transport/handling damage, lightning strikes
  4. 4. DNV GL © 2014 27 August 2014 4 Lessons Learned: 2014 Updates Cause of blade failure Examples of risk mitigants Blades at existing wind projects New production blades Near term Long term Manufacturing defect Inspection: Visual, NDI Ground-based NDI Preventive reinforcement Access to turbine controls LPS retrofits Re-assess site conditions Manufacturing monitoring Improved acceptance criteria Automation Non-destructive inspection Wider use of building-block design/test approach Damage tolerant design methods Targeted manufacturing changes from assessment of cost of poor quality Application of IEC 61400-5 Progressive damage Condition monitoring Distortion of blade sections Nonlinear FEA Comprehensive structural verification Excessive loads due to system dynamics Improved controls Improved analytical tools Excessive loads due to environmental conditions Improved site inflow data, Improved LPS design and increased testing
  5. 5. DNV GL © 2014 27 August 2014 Conclusion: Challenges for this Community 5 1. Eliminate the effect of manufacturing defects on blade failure rates. • Assess cost of poor quality; make targeted improvements. • “Gold in the mine” – dig in the right places. Avoidance of wrinkles and avoidance of understrength bonds are key areas. • New materials? New processes? Process compatibility? More automation? • All must be at the right costs, non-recurring and recurring. 2. Improve non-destructive inspection, particularly for adhesive bonds. • Existing projects: Ground-based. • New production: Proof testing or destructive testing. 3. Improve analytical tools • For site suitability assessments. • For resonant phenomena. 4. Improve lightning protection system design (standards), and testing.
  6. 6. DNV GL © 2014 27 August 2014 SAFER, SMARTER, GREENER www.dnvgl.com 6 Matt Malkin matthew.malkin@dnvgl.com 206-387-4296

×