Open Access Futures in the
Humanities and Social Sciences
A one day conference for the humanities and social sciences sect...
Welcome
Ziyad Marar
Global Publishing Director, SAGE
@ZiyadMarar
#HSSOA
Opening Address
Professor Nigel Vincent
Vice President for Research & Higher
Education Policy, British Academy
#HSSOA
Open Access:
the problem space
Professor Nigel Vincent, FBA MAE
(The University of Manchester)

Vice-President Research, B...
The British Academy and OA
• national academy of Humanities
and Social Sciences
• fellows elected on basis of
distinguishe...
RAE 2008 outputs by publication type:
Humanities
Books

Chapters

Journal Articles Other

English

39%

27%

31%

3%

Hist...
RAE 2008 outputs by publication type: Social
Sciences
Books
Sociology
Law
Politics

22%
18%
29%

Economics

1%

Chapters J...
RAE 2008 outputs by publication type
One institution made two separate submissions to the Anthropology Panel:
Books
Biolog...
3 broad classes of discipline
• 3/3 journal articles: Natural Sciences, Economics
• 2/3 journal articles: Sociology, Law, ...
HSS disciplines and OA
• HSS fields are not ‘exceptions’ but fit into a multidimensional disciplinary space
• different di...
The international context
• dominant trend seems to be towards green OA
• absence of exercises like REF to force complianc...
OA as it affects the 3 types of publication
• journal articles
• monographs (‘long-form’)

• book chapters
Journal articles
HEFCE and BA research project investigating discipline
by discipline:
• ‘half-lives’ of journal articles
...
Monographs
•
•
•
•

tend to be single-authored
not captured by usual bibliometric methods
international gold standard in s...
Status of monographs
‘There is no other medium that allows for the
depth of research, analysis and sustained
argumentation...
Options for OA monographs
• gold with APC: subventions from the institution
or the funding agency BUT costly – cf Austria
...
HEFCE group on monographs
• chaired by Geoff Crossick
• aims to explore and understand:
– scale/nature of problems for mon...
“The Wellcome Trust today announces that it is to
extend its open access policy to include all
scholarly monographs and bo...
“The new policy does not apply to
textbooks, 'trade' books, general reference works
or works of fiction, or to collections...
Book chapters: contra
‘If you write a chapter for an edited book, you
might as well write the paper and then bury it in
a ...
Book chapters: pro
• a range of views come together in one volume
• benefits of mutual peer review by authors
• whole grea...
Book chapters and online publishing
• chapters can be rescued from ‘invisibility’
• option to access the whole collection ...
Licence type and text mining
• CC-BY preferred by Finch
• allows unlimited text and data-mining

• BUT text-mining less su...
OA and peer review (PR)
•
•
•
•
•

traditional journal and book publishing built on PR
PR as the guarantee of quality and ...
Panel One

Why OA? Which OA?
#HSSOA
Panel 1: Why OA? Which OA?
Chair
Professor Adam Tickell, Provost and Vice-Principal, University of Birmingham
@adamtickell...
Open access

Brian Hole
LSE, Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 24 October 2013
Overview
 Why publish?
 What is open access?

 Licenses
 Publishing vs. archiving
 Benefits vs.
disadvantages
The Social Contract
of Science
•

Dissemination

•

Validation

•

Further development

Scientific Malpractice
•

Results
...
What is Open Access?
Most simply:
No barriers to access or reuse
By “open access” to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public
internet, permitting any users to read, d...
OA publishing vs. archiving
‘Gold open access’ (publishing)
• Publisher makes content freely available
• Content has been ...
Disadvantages vs. benefits
Often cited CC-BY disadvantages for the humanities
• “Humanities research involves reuse of copyright material
and therefo...
• “Someone will create a derivative of my work and copyright it”
Derivatives are allowed, and if sufficiently original can...
Questions?

For more information:
brian.hole@ubiquitypress.com
@ubiquitypress
http://www.ubiquitypress.com
http://wiki.cre...
Afternoon Address
David Sweeney
Director (Research, Innovation and Skills), HEFCE
@uhaa08
#HSSOA
#OAREF

IN A POST-2014 REF
• David Sweeney
• OA in HSS, 24/10/13
Introduction
• Funding bodies' proposals for open
access in a post-2014 REF

• Join the conversation at #OAREF

#OAREF
#OAREF

Some benefits of open access
• Wider and smarter access to more
information for research community
• Increased vis...
#OAREF

Some issues...
• Embargo periods
• Learned Societies and Subject
Associations
• Monographs
• Licensing
• Academic ...
#OAREF

2010: estimated 25,400 journals in STEM alone
2009: 1.5 million articles published
one every 20 minutes
Volume is ...
#OAREF

Funders

£

Universities

Libraries
Repositories

Green

Publishers

Researchers

£
Advertisers Donors Others

Gol...
February advice letter
#OAREF
#OAREF

Policy proposals
Definition
Outputs submitted to a post-2014
REF should be open access.

Exceptions

Criteria
#OAREF

Criteria: what do we mean by
open access?

=

• Accessible through a UK HEI
repository, immediately upon
either ac...
Criteria: what do we mean by
open access?

=

• Embargo periods to be
respected by the repository

• REF panel will follow...
#OAREF

Criteria: what do we mean by
open access?

=

• Allows search and re-use of
content (including downloading
and tex...
#OAREF

Criteria: points for consultation
•

Appropriateness of criteria?

•

Role for institutional repositories?

•

Acc...
#OAREF

Definition: which outputs will
need to meet the criteria?

=

• Journal articles or conference
proceedings only

•...
#OAREF

Exceptions: how should we
treat exceptions?

=

• On a case-by-case basis
OR
• A percentage approach to
compliance...
#OAREF

Exceptions: a percentage
approach to compliance

=

• Consistent target across all
outputs within scope (70%)
• Va...
#OAREF

HSS Tensions (1)
• Thinking significantly impacted by
monographs
• Monographs ‘market’ is simply broken –
Missingh...
#OAREF

HSS Tensions (2)
• All monograph discussions underpinned by
OUP/CUP/Yale/Rutgers etc but
• Many scholars just can’...
#OAREF

HSS Tensions (3)
• Funder/researcher relationship is much less
settled in HSS than STEM
• ‘individualistic concept...
#OAREF

HSS Tensions (4)
• More published in foreign language journals
and transition to OA may take longer there

• Will ...
#OAREF

HSS Tensions (5)
• Academic freedom – freedom of expression
doesn’t mean unconstrained freedom where
to express – ...
#OAREF
Panel Two
New Horizons? Open access and
the potential for positive change in
HSS research communication
#HSSOA
Panel 2: New Horizons?
Chair
Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, LSE
@PJDunleavy...
What Does Open Access Mean for the
Humanities?

Dr Caroline Edwards
Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature, Birkbeck...
Lessons from the Sciences

(2) the GNU project,
MIT A.I. Lab, 1980s
(1) Hacker culture, California, 1960s

(3) arXiv, Corn...
Alluvium Journal:
Open access, short form articles published through WordPress
Innovation in Peer Review?

• Artificial scarcity no longer applies in digital environment
• Separate the “distinction pha...
How do we fund open access?
 Open access is not free access
 Scale of open access publishing
(1) free labour & free subm...
International Challenges
 Addressing the problem of access gaps
 OA is not universal access
 UNESCO’s Global Open Acces...
The Open Library of Humanities (OLH)
Humanities Megajournal & Monograph Pilot
Panel 2: New Horizons?
Chair
Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, LSE
@PJDunleavy...
Panel Three

What next? Transition mechanisms
and next steps in HSS
#HSSOA
Panel 3: What next?
Chair – Dr. Paul Ayris, Director UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer
@ucylpay
Professor Ste...
Open Access Futures in the
Humanities and Social Sciences
Thursday, 24th October 2013
Senate House, London
Sally Hardy
Chi...
OA Journal Launch



67% of RSA income comes from publishing receipts



Regional Studies, Regional Science responds to ...
RSA Journals and
Magazines
Regional Studies
Regional Science
Content
 Standard academic articles (6-8,000 words)
 Review papers
 Short briefings (...
Article Processing Charges
Key Messages


Open access remains a challenge to many societies



Societies need to rebalance their finances to future...
Thank You
Sally Hardy
Chief Executive
Regional Studies Association
www.regionalstudies.org
sally.hardy@regionalstudies.org
Panel 3: What next?
Chair – Dr. Paul Ayris, Director UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer
@ucylpay
Professor Ste...
What Next? A University Perspective
Dr Simon Kerridge
Director of
Chair of ARMA
Research Services The Association of Resea...
Research Management and
Administration
– RMAs manage and support research…
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–

Information (including about r...
Typical University Position
– Full Support for Open Access
• In principle

– Worry about… the details, eg:
•
•
•
•
•
•

Pa...
Planning Ahead
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–

Reduction / redistribution of library subscriptions
Growing importance of IRs
Subject Area...
A Typical? UK HEI Policy
– OA Policy
• Support OA (and ‘Open Science’) – prefer Green [libre?]

– Institutional Repository...
Kent ‘Simple’ Example
Current Issues
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–

Is your Policy equitable?
How much will/should the institutional top up be?
What abo...
In Summary… for the HEI
–
–
–
–

The landscape is changing, we want to:
Produce the best research
Best support our academi...
Panel 3: What next?
Chair – Dr. Paul Ayris, Director UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer
@ucylpay
Professor Ste...
Closing Remarks
Jane Tinkler
Public Policy Group, LSE
@janetinkler
#HSSOA
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences    a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group
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Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group

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A one day conference held by SAGE and the LSE Public Policy Group to explore the issues of OA within the HSS sector.
A video of the conference to accompany the slides can be found here - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg8Hz5Alt2FqQbkdZJmdtS5FIslB5pf6K

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  • NOTE about usWe are a researcher led publisher. Everything we do is to support researchers and try to improve scientific communication. Started trading last year.Have grown out of arts and humanities, but now expanding into all areas.
  • This is for Stuart from the Royal Society
  • Maybe move David’s Twitter handle to nearer his name (maybe like the final slide layout).
  • Here is my context…We have nearly 2,000 members who deal with these things (often in conjunction with the Library) on a day to day basis.In terms of the future we are of course working across our institutions to help inform and shape future policies.
  • Cat among the pigeons… or perhaps… finches…?
  • Cat among the pigeons… or perhaps… finches…?
  • http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/fact/This is a SIMPLE workflow… and is for articles only… nothing on monographs or chapters or… we MUST find ways of making this easier…
  • http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/fact/
  • http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/fact/
  • http://www.researchinfonet.org/finch/quick-links/Is a great resource!more@jiscmail.ac.uk [managing open research] open email list run my Ray Kent at De Montfort University
  • Open access futures in the humanities and social sciences a one day conference by sage and the lse public policy group

    1. 1. Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences A one day conference for the humanities and social sciences sector presented by SAGE and the LSE Public Policy Group #HSSOA
    2. 2. Welcome Ziyad Marar Global Publishing Director, SAGE @ZiyadMarar #HSSOA
    3. 3. Opening Address Professor Nigel Vincent Vice President for Research & Higher Education Policy, British Academy #HSSOA
    4. 4. Open Access: the problem space Professor Nigel Vincent, FBA MAE (The University of Manchester) Vice-President Research, British Academy
    5. 5. The British Academy and OA • national academy of Humanities and Social Sciences • fellows elected on basis of distinguished published work • funds post-docs & small grants • publishes both monographs and periodicals
    6. 6. RAE 2008 outputs by publication type: Humanities Books Chapters Journal Articles Other English 39% 27% 31% 3% History 40% 22% 37% 1% French Philosophy Chemistry 37% 14% 0% 23% 20% 0% 39% 65% 100% 1% 1% 0% Totals based on submissions drawn from the top 10 institutions for each field and with a GPA of 2.5 or better
    7. 7. RAE 2008 outputs by publication type: Social Sciences Books Sociology Law Politics 22% 18% 29% Economics 1% Chapters Journal Articles Other 10% 64% 3% 15% 65% 1% 9% 62% 0% 2% 89% 7% Totals based on submissions drawn from the top 10 institutions for each field and with a GPA of 2.5 or better
    8. 8. RAE 2008 outputs by publication type One institution made two separate submissions to the Anthropology Panel: Books Biological Anthropology Social Anthropology Chapters Journal articles Other 2% 4% 93% 0 31% 29% 37% 3%
    9. 9. 3 broad classes of discipline • 3/3 journal articles: Natural Sciences, Economics • 2/3 journal articles: Sociology, Law, Philosophy • 1/3 journal articles: English, History, Mod Langs
    10. 10. HSS disciplines and OA • HSS fields are not ‘exceptions’ but fit into a multidimensional disciplinary space • different disciplines = different publication profiles • profiles relatively constant over time & institution • similar profiles also hold in Europe and the USA and define the benchmark for international research reputations
    11. 11. The international context • dominant trend seems to be towards green OA • absence of exercises like REF to force compliance • many journals will remain non-compliant (not green or only with 36+ month embargos; not CC-BY) • what does this mean for UK academics whose international standing relies on publishing in such journals?
    12. 12. OA as it affects the 3 types of publication • journal articles • monographs (‘long-form’) • book chapters
    13. 13. Journal articles HEFCE and BA research project investigating discipline by discipline: • ‘half-lives’ of journal articles • effect of embargo periods on library acquisition • involvement in non-UK journal publishing • commitment to OA overseas PI: Prof Chris Wickham
    14. 14. Monographs • • • • tend to be single-authored not captured by usual bibliometric methods international gold standard in some fields difficult boundary between ‘academic’ and ‘trade’ lists for publishers
    15. 15. Status of monographs ‘There is no other medium that allows for the depth of research, analysis and sustained argumentation.’ [British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, 2012]
    16. 16. Options for OA monographs • gold with APC: subventions from the institution or the funding agency BUT costly – cf Austria FWF pays €14,000 and new Wellcome policy • green:with an embargo period BUT how long? • ‘mixed’: self-organizing co-operatives BUT how sustainable?; e-version OA and print version for a payment; etc
    17. 17. HEFCE group on monographs • chaired by Geoff Crossick • aims to explore and understand: – scale/nature of problems for monographs – place/purpose of monographs in the academic context – emerging models that accommodate OA
    18. 18. “The Wellcome Trust today announces that it is to extend its open access policy to include all scholarly monographs and book chapters written by its grantholders as part of their Trust-funded research … The Wellcome Trust will make funds available for the payment of publishers' open access monograph processing charges.” 30 May 2013
    19. 19. “The new policy does not apply to textbooks, 'trade' books, general reference works or works of fiction, or to collections edited but not authored by Trust grantholders. It would not affect, for example, a non-fiction work written by a medical historian aimed at a general audience and published by a commercial publisher.”
    20. 20. Book chapters: contra ‘If you write a chapter for an edited book, you might as well write the paper and then bury it in a hole in the ground.’ Dorothy Bishop http://deevybee.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/howto-bury-your-academic-writing.html
    21. 21. Book chapters: pro • a range of views come together in one volume • benefits of mutual peer review by authors • whole greater than the sum of the parts http://peterwebster.wordpress.com/2013/01/14 /on-the-invisibility-of-edited-collections/
    22. 22. Book chapters and online publishing • chapters can be rescued from ‘invisibility’ • option to access the whole collection or individual chapters • same issues as monographs for access and sustainability
    23. 23. Licence type and text mining • CC-BY preferred by Finch • allows unlimited text and data-mining • BUT text-mining less successful on free prose • AND not guaranteed to detect quotation and text in languages other than English • Bioinformatics publishes under CC-BY-NC
    24. 24. OA and peer review (PR) • • • • • traditional journal and book publishing built on PR PR as the guarantee of quality and reputation PR as the foundation of RAE and REF OA does not necessarily undermine PR BUT some OA ventures also question the value of PR (cf PLOS-ONE and the concept of post-publication review)
    25. 25. Panel One Why OA? Which OA? #HSSOA
    26. 26. Panel 1: Why OA? Which OA? Chair Professor Adam Tickell, Provost and Vice-Principal, University of Birmingham @adamtickell Panellists Jonathan Gray, Director of Policy, Open Knowledge Foundation @jwyg Professor Peter Mandler, President, Royal Historical Society Brian Hole, Founder and CEO, Ubiquity Press @brian_hole Professor Charlotte Waelde, Chair of Intellectual Property Law, University of Exeter
    27. 27. Open access Brian Hole LSE, Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 24 October 2013
    28. 28. Overview  Why publish?  What is open access?  Licenses  Publishing vs. archiving  Benefits vs. disadvantages
    29. 29. The Social Contract of Science • Dissemination • Validation • Further development Scientific Malpractice • Results • Data • Software
    30. 30. What is Open Access?
    31. 31. Most simply: No barriers to access or reuse
    32. 32. By “open access” to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited. Budapest Open Access Initiative OA allows users to “copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship.” Bethsida/Berlin statements ✔ ✗ ✗
    33. 33. OA publishing vs. archiving ‘Gold open access’ (publishing) • Publisher makes content freely available • Content has been through peer review, anti-plagiarism checks, etc. • Publisher may require an article processing charge (APC) ‘Green open access’ (archiving) • Institution makes a pre-publication version of content freely available in own repository, with no charge • Content is released early and immediately
    34. 34. Disadvantages vs. benefits
    35. 35. Often cited CC-BY disadvantages for the humanities • “Humanities research involves reuse of copyright material and therefore can’t use CC-BY” Fair use and fair dealing still permitted. What we really need are copyright exceptions, and to encourage the release of more material as OA. • “I don’t want my work to be translated without my oversight and quality control” CC-BY: “You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).” • “Open access will increase the likelihood of plagiarism” Attribution is still required. Plagiarism is actually easier to detect when the source is openly available. • “I will lose royalties if my book is available for free” It’s early days for OA books, but current indications are that royalties are stable to higher. Publishers like UP don’t aim to profit from royalties.
    36. 36. • “Someone will create a derivative of my work and copyright it” Derivatives are allowed, and if sufficiently original can also be copyright protected. But this does not affect the copyright of the original work. • “Open access means low quality peer review” Peer review is completely independent of the distribution system. This has not happened STM. • “Citation metrics don’t work in the humanities” Why not? Use of citation metrics alone is problematic in all fields. Halflives are longer and therefore metrics need to be looked at in context. • “Open access is a threat to academic freedom” Open access clearly increases freedom in very many areas. Mandates do not have to restrict authors to certain journals only - publishers just need to adapt. • “Open access is too expensive for the humanities” High fees and “double dipping” need to be discouraged. APCs don’t have to be high – many OA journals don’t charge them at all, and publishers can be sustainable at low cost (see next slide).
    37. 37. Questions? For more information: brian.hole@ubiquitypress.com @ubiquitypress http://www.ubiquitypress.com http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions
    38. 38. Afternoon Address David Sweeney Director (Research, Innovation and Skills), HEFCE @uhaa08 #HSSOA
    39. 39. #OAREF IN A POST-2014 REF • David Sweeney • OA in HSS, 24/10/13
    40. 40. Introduction • Funding bodies' proposals for open access in a post-2014 REF • Join the conversation at #OAREF #OAREF
    41. 41. #OAREF Some benefits of open access • Wider and smarter access to more information for research community • Increased visibility, usage and impact for researchers and institutions • Increased economic and social impact of public funding
    42. 42. #OAREF Some issues... • Embargo periods • Learned Societies and Subject Associations • Monographs • Licensing • Academic freedom
    43. 43. #OAREF 2010: estimated 25,400 journals in STEM alone 2009: 1.5 million articles published one every 20 minutes Volume is part of the problem
    44. 44. #OAREF Funders £ Universities Libraries Repositories Green Publishers Researchers £ Advertisers Donors Others Gold
    45. 45. February advice letter
    46. 46. #OAREF
    47. 47. #OAREF Policy proposals Definition Outputs submitted to a post-2014 REF should be open access. Exceptions Criteria
    48. 48. #OAREF Criteria: what do we mean by open access? = • Accessible through a UK HEI repository, immediately upon either acceptance or publication • Available as the final peerreviewed text
    49. 49. Criteria: what do we mean by open access? = • Embargo periods to be respected by the repository • REF panel will follow embargo period set by the appropriate Research Council #OAREF
    50. 50. #OAREF Criteria: what do we mean by open access? = • Allows search and re-use of content (including downloading and text-mining) • Manual and automated re-use • Subject to proper attribution under appropriate licensing
    51. 51. #OAREF Criteria: points for consultation • Appropriateness of criteria? • Role for institutional repositories? • Acceptance or publication? • Embargo periods varying by REF panel? • Licensing requirements?
    52. 52. #OAREF Definition: which outputs will need to meet the criteria? = • Journal articles or conference proceedings only • Published after a two year notice period (i.e. 2016) • UK HEI in address field
    53. 53. #OAREF Exceptions: how should we treat exceptions? = • On a case-by-case basis OR • A percentage approach to compliance ‣ ‣ consistent across all outputs, or varying by main panel
    54. 54. #OAREF Exceptions: a percentage approach to compliance = • Consistent target across all outputs within scope (70%) • Vary by REF main panel Main panel A B C D Percentage target for 75% 75% 70% 60% compliance
    55. 55. #OAREF HSS Tensions (1) • Thinking significantly impacted by monographs • Monographs ‘market’ is simply broken – Missingham 2013 • Journals market is functioning
    56. 56. #OAREF HSS Tensions (2) • All monograph discussions underpinned by OUP/CUP/Yale/Rutgers etc but • Many scholars just can’t get published by those esteemed publishers • OA is an essential element in allowing more work to be published in monograph form
    57. 57. #OAREF HSS Tensions (3) • Funder/researcher relationship is much less settled in HSS than STEM • ‘individualistic concepts of authorship that may do more to advance academic careers than collective public knowledge’ – Barron 2013
    58. 58. #OAREF HSS Tensions (4) • More published in foreign language journals and transition to OA may take longer there • Will international mandates (EU, US, Australia) lead to overseas journals making a transition?
    59. 59. #OAREF HSS Tensions (5) • Academic freedom – freedom of expression doesn’t mean unconstrained freedom where to express – already cost and quality constraints • However highly desirable for choice of dissemination route to be by academics helped by publishers and funders….
    60. 60. #OAREF
    61. 61. Panel Two New Horizons? Open access and the potential for positive change in HSS research communication #HSSOA
    62. 62. Panel 2: New Horizons? Chair Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, LSE @PJDunleavy Panellists Dr. Caroline Edwards, Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature at Birkbeck, University of London @the_blochian Dr. Paul Kirby, Lecturer in International Security at the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex @PabloK Ian Mulvany, Head of Technology, eLife @IanMulvany
    63. 63. What Does Open Access Mean for the Humanities? Dr Caroline Edwards Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature, Birkbeck Director, Open Library of Humanities (OLH) caroline.edwards@bbk.ac.uk @the_blochian www.drcarolineedwards.com
    64. 64. Lessons from the Sciences (2) the GNU project, MIT A.I. Lab, 1980s (1) Hacker culture, California, 1960s (3) arXiv, Cornell University Library, 1991• Founded by physicist Paul Ginsparg in 1991, Los Alamos • Repository for pre-prints in maths, physics, astronomy, computer science • Circulating scientific papers prior to publication • Developed out of informal professional networks (via email)
    65. 65. Alluvium Journal: Open access, short form articles published through WordPress
    66. 66. Innovation in Peer Review? • Artificial scarcity no longer applies in digital environment • Separate the “distinction phase” from “the publishing phase” • Are alternative modes of peer review possible? • Should peer review be “blind” (anonymous) or “open” (public) • How does peer review differ from editorial labour? • Could peer review take place post-publication? • What about peer-to-peer review?
    67. 67. How do we fund open access?  Open access is not free access  Scale of open access publishing (1) free labour & free submission (2) advertising revenue (3) pay on demand (4) Article Processing Charge (APC) (5) Library Consortia Image by 401(k)2012 under a CC BY-SA license
    68. 68. International Challenges  Addressing the problem of access gaps  OA is not universal access  UNESCO’s Global Open Access Portal (GOAP, 2011)  International Conference of African Digital Libraries & Archives (ICADLA, 2009)  Scarcity of expertise and resources  Issue of OA journals not being internationally recognised Image by Ivan McClellan under a CC BY license
    69. 69. The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) Humanities Megajournal & Monograph Pilot
    70. 70. Panel 2: New Horizons? Chair Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, LSE @PJDunleavy Panellists Dr. Caroline Edwards, Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature at Birkbeck, University of London @the_blochian Dr. Paul Kirby, Lecturer in International Security at the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex @PabloK Ian Mulvany, Head of Technology, eLife @IanMulvany
    71. 71. Panel Three What next? Transition mechanisms and next steps in HSS #HSSOA
    72. 72. Panel 3: What next? Chair – Dr. Paul Ayris, Director UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer @ucylpay Professor Steffen Bӧhm, University of Essex and Mayfly Books @SteffenBoehm Ziyad Marar, Global Publishing Director, SAGE @ZiyadMarar Sally Hardy, Chief Executive, Regional Studies Association @Sallyjhardy Simon Kerridge, Director of Research Services at the University of Kent and Chair, ARMA (UK) @SimonRKerridge Professor Ian Walmsley, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and University Collections), University of Oxford
    73. 73. Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences Thursday, 24th October 2013 Senate House, London Sally Hardy Chief Executive Regional Studies Association www.regionalstudies.org sally.hardy@regionalstudies.org
    74. 74. OA Journal Launch  67% of RSA income comes from publishing receipts  Regional Studies, Regional Science responds to the shift in publishing paradigm and is the next step in the Association’s strategic development  RSRS fits RSA’s development planning goals – it will reach into new markets and to younger and/or less traditional group of researchers  The landscape for RSRS includes competitor hybrid journals as well as interdisciplinary titles such as SAGE Open and there are subject specific OA journals
    75. 75. RSA Journals and Magazines
    76. 76. Regional Studies Regional Science Content  Standard academic articles (6-8,000 words)  Review papers  Short briefings (3,000 word max)  Regional policy reviews (3-5,000 words)  Regional graphics  Early career researcher (ECR) contributions Publishing Editorial Structure  Two Editors in Chief, 25 Associate Editors, 50 editorial advisory board members Review Process  average paper turnaround of 28 days  review criteria: quality, relevance, clarity of expression  peer review panel not judging the significance or likely impact of any paper
    77. 77. Article Processing Charges
    78. 78. Key Messages  Open access remains a challenge to many societies  Societies need to rebalance their finances to future proof their research ecosystem contribution  Time scales are important  Issues include: licensing, embargo periods, funding streams and the global roll out of OA BUT  There are opportunities for societies  We need to innovate and experiment, we need to think in the new paradigm not the old
    79. 79. Thank You Sally Hardy Chief Executive Regional Studies Association www.regionalstudies.org sally.hardy@regionalstudies.org
    80. 80. Panel 3: What next? Chair – Dr. Paul Ayris, Director UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer @ucylpay Professor Steffen Bӧhm, University of Essex and Mayfly Books @SteffenBoehm Ziyad Marar, Global Publishing Director, SAGE @ZiyadMarar Sally Hardy, Chief Executive, Regional Studies Association @Sallyjhardy Simon Kerridge, Director of Research Services at the University of Kent and Chair, ARMA (UK) @SimonRKerridge Professor Ian Walmsley, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and University Collections), University of Oxford
    81. 81. What Next? A University Perspective Dr Simon Kerridge Director of Chair of ARMA Research Services The Association of Research University of Kent Managers and Administrators
    82. 82. Research Management and Administration – RMAs manage and support research… – – – – – – – – Information (including about research outputs) Pre-award [proposals] (incl. OA costs) Post-award [projects] (incl. APCs) Development / Planning (incl. pre-payment deals) Strategy / Policy (incl. OA, RDM policies) Assessment (incl. REF) Metrics (incl. Citations, etc.) Research Students (incl. E-theses) Page 91
    83. 83. Typical University Position – Full Support for Open Access • In principle – Worry about… the details, eg: • • • • • • Page 92 How to manage/enforce/comply with it Particular licences (NC, ND) Cost of Gold Who pays / international collaboration Providing support… academic freedom The FUTURE implications of decisions made now…
    84. 84. Planning Ahead – – – – – – – – Reduction / redistribution of library subscriptions Growing importance of IRs Subject Areas repositories, eg SSRN, UKDS Profile/influence/funding (HEI, Subject, UK) Technical underpinnings: ORCID, FundRef, CERIF Developing ideas: Diamond, Monographs, … The next REF International developments… Page 94
    85. 85. A Typical? UK HEI Policy – OA Policy • Support OA (and ‘Open Science’) – prefer Green [libre?] – Institutional Repository • Mandatory meta-data. Full Text where allowable – CRIS – ensure automated links – Single process for Gold APC – – – – Internal ‘top-up’ – how much? Prioritise areas (eg RCUK, ring fenced funding) – how? Prioritise high quality articles – how? Journal lists? Managed by IS/RS? – independent? – Encourage home grown OA Journals? (eg feminists@law) – Central support for Research Data Management?
    86. 86. Kent ‘Simple’ Example
    87. 87. Current Issues – – – – – – – – – – – Is your Policy equitable? How much will/should the institutional top up be? What about institutionally funded research? Who judges the quality? Academic Freedom? Who (which HEI) pays? How is the metadata stored (linked to projects) [CRIS?] What about the underlying research data? Can it be reported on to RCUK ROS? Benchmarking of OA compliance? Other purposes for the information? • GtR, REF2020, RCUK funding, Impact, …?
    88. 88. In Summary… for the HEI – – – – The landscape is changing, we want to: Produce the best research Best support our academic staff to do it ‘Manage’ the processes • Have information (without asking for it… again) • To make strategic decisions about… investment – – – – Engage with all stakeholders Expand eg GtR to include all UK outputs? Developments: Open Peer Review, Social Media, … Open Research – https://www.arma.ac.uk/resources/research-communications-open-accessresearch-data – http://www.researchinfonet.org/finch/quick-links/ – more@jiscmail.ac.uk [Managing Open REsearch]
    89. 89. Panel 3: What next? Chair – Dr. Paul Ayris, Director UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer @ucylpay Professor Steffen Bӧhm, University of Essex and Mayfly Books @SteffenBoehm Ziyad Marar, Global Publishing Director, SAGE @ZiyadMarar Sally Hardy, Chief Executive, Regional Studies Association @Sallyjhardy Simon Kerridge, Director of Research Services at the University of Kent and Chair, ARMA (UK) @SimonRKerridge Professor Ian Walmsley, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and University Collections), University of Oxford
    90. 90. Closing Remarks Jane Tinkler Public Policy Group, LSE @janetinkler #HSSOA

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