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Beyond Built Heritage Documentation: digital applications needs for research and conservation

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by Cristina Gonzalez-Longo (University of Strathclyde, Department of Architecture, ADCRU).
Presentation given at the DEDICATE final seminar (University of Glasgow, 21st October 2013)

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Beyond Built Heritage Documentation: digital applications needs for research and conservation

  1. 1. Beyond Built Heritage Documentation: digital applications needs for research and conservation Cristina Gonzalez-Longo RIBA SCA RIAS AFHE Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU) DEDICATE- Glasgow 21 October 2013
  2. 2. Building capacity in Architectural Research, Design and Conservation: MSc in Architectural Design for the Conservation of Built Heritage (ADCoBH) starting in 2014 Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU) Two fully funded PhD students and Six 4th year dissertations Research-informed practice
  3. 3. ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH Existing and new data
  4. 4. Researchers • Lack of digital literacy- large scale use of architectural and art historical digital data is at the moment severely hindered by generational as well as technical issues: incompatibilities, multiple formats, specifications and a lack of shared vocabularies • “Treasure  hunt’:  some  researchers  place  the  scope  of  the  research   in finding new, unknown, documents rather than to use the documents to bring new knowledge and to use also the buildings as source of information, analysis and interpretation. • There  is  more  search  for  the  “new  unknown”  rather  that   consultation  of  “old  known”  documents  and  the  buildings
  5. 5. Archives • Separation of documents and drawings (different conservation needs) • Ownership
  6. 6. • Impossibility to reproduce and/or high cost • Poor conservation (specially 17th c), documents partially damaged • Geographical location • Poor digital repositories, limited visibility: CANNOT LOOK IN DETAIL / MULTIPLE DOCUMENTS / PARTIAL ACCESS
  7. 7. Owners • Lack understanding about the importance of the material they own • Cost SLIDES!
  8. 8. NEED TO INTERROGATE DATA BASES
  9. 9. Layers Artist, craftsmen, materials
  10. 10. Masons
  11. 11. People
  12. 12. Comparisons Influences
  13. 13. Not just buildings: Landscape,  decoration,  objects,  books,  memorabilia….
  14. 14. Hamilton Palace (1682, 1693-1701) Demolished in 1929
  15. 15. http://hamilton.rcahms.gov.uk/
  16. 16. http://hamilton.rcahms.gov.uk/
  17. 17. http://www.scran.ac.uk/
  18. 18. http://www.scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/
  19. 19. ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE
  20. 20. ARCHITECT’S  NEED  FOR  DIGITAL  CURATION  OF  THEIR  WORK • Publicity, awards, reference for future projects • Architects are legally required to keep project records and drawings as claims can arise many years after the completion of a project . • Most claims occur in the first ten years following completion, but data may need to be kept for as long as 20 years after the date of the certificate of making good defects. If documents are being retained electronically material can be destroyed 10 years after the date of practical completion. • The architect has to conduct a risk assessment against the costs of archiving the material. Any filing system should take the ease of retrieval into account.
  21. 21. CONSERVATION PROJECT
  22. 22. • Preliminary Investigations and Research • Analysis and Diagnosis • Architectural Design Project • Site Works • Maintenance
  23. 23. Preliminary HISTORICAL and ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH should inform interventions on valuable reliminary nvestigations and esearch buildings, including research on construction history P I R
  24. 24. SURVEY, ANALYSIS and identification of the CAUSES OF DECAY
  25. 25. Structural and material investigations Preferably NON-DESTRUCTIVE techniques 3D scan, ultrasonic, X-ray, thermography, etc http://www.irtsurveys.co.uk AOC Archaeology Group
  26. 26.  Keep photographic/scan RECORDS of works and findings, to be kept by building owner and user  These data helps to establish clearly the PROCEDURE and TIMETABLE for regular maintenance.
  27. 27. It relies on the skill of the individual user to pull all the information together, often in a very rudimentary way, which cannot be transferred to others No time and money in projects to comprehensibly record and curate
  28. 28. The construction industry is new-build orientated rather than conservation This must change! 50% of costruction work is in refubishment/conservation 85%  of  today’s  buildings  will  form   70% of the building stock in 2050
  29. 29. http://www.ribaplanofwork.com/
  30. 30. ‘Digital  Built  Britain’  network “products  that  could  talk  digitally  to  each  other” ‘Digital  Conserved  Britain’….? Information about the architecture and construction of existing buildings will also contribute to energy efficiency and carbon reduction.
  31. 31. http://www.riba-insight.com/
  32. 32. http://www.architecture.com/
  33. 33. CREATIVE v STANDARD Concerns about design quality LACK OF DIGITAL TRAINING EARLY ON IN THE EDUCATION SYSTEM COST http://www.gsconnect.co.uk
  34. 34. CIC regional BIM Hubs – Task group Scotland “To  develop  the  use  of  Building  Information  Modelling  (BIM)  in  the  Scottish   built environment and to demonstrate the benefits that can be achieved through  knowledge  sharing,  collaboration  and  best  practice  guidance” COBie CIC Building Information Modelling (BIM) Protocol 2013 requirement for the role of Information Manager engaged by the Employer http://www.bimtaskgroup.org
  35. 35. Outreach http://www.bimtaskgroup.org
  36. 36. http://www.3d-coform.eu/
  37. 37. http://www.3d-coform.eu/
  38. 38. Although we understand now the close relationship between immovable-movable and tangible-intangible built cultural heritage, existing research and conservation practices do not support this theoretical framework
  39. 39. Very positive impact of: “The  Care  and  Conservation  of   Georgian  Houses”  in Edinburgh (or,  internationally,  “Manuale di recupero della Cittá di  Roma”)   They can be updated, considering also modern means to disseminate information, like interactive tools and modelling From  the  ‘Manual’  to  the  handling  of  big   data
  40. 40. NEED TO EASILY SEARCH, LINK AND MANIPULATE DATA
  41. 41. Democratisation of data Common  ‘language’ Digital citizens Integration Interactive Simplicity Clarity
  42. 42.  Design a new accessible digital platform which will allow for an integrated knowledge and analysis of buildings and architectural collections from around the world.  A common digital environment with large 3D and image linking and enhancing capabilities: architectural, artistic, technical and scientific data relating to a single building  Drawn on established research and techniques from a variety of disciplines, with a convergence of Arts and Humanities with Technical disciplines.  Able to document and analyse historical techniques through extremely accurate visual capabilities  This can also lead to new attributions, finding comparative objects/fabrics, which will inform research (dating, traces of previous conservation, etc) and conservation.
  43. 43. “Collaboration, scholarship and sweat” Prof Charles McKean Cristina Gonzalez-Longo c.gonzalez-longo@strath.ac.uk www.cglarchitect.com

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