Neuro Anatomy For Teachers

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Brief neuro anantomy lesson

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Neuro Anatomy For Teachers

  1. 1. Neuro-Anatomy for teachers Thomas B. King, M. Ed. Hospital Education Program VCU Health Care System
  2. 5. Motor Control <ul><li>The right side of the brain controls the left side of the body </li></ul><ul><li>The left side of the brain controls the right side of the body </li></ul>
  3. 9. The Limbic System <ul><li>James Papez (1937) proposed a hypothesis for neural circuitry underlying emotions and emotional responses. </li></ul><ul><li>This was called the Papez Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>Today, we refer to the limbic system, which follows our current understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Disorders that interfere with the limbic system can affect emotions and behavior. </li></ul>
  4. 16. The Basil Ganglia <ul><li>The basil ganglia may play a role in the processing of sensory and motor integrative functions. </li></ul><ul><li>Problems with basal ganglia functioning could adversely affect such things as writing and copying from both near and far point. </li></ul>
  5. 19. Motor and Sensory Strips <ul><li>Across the top of the brain, in a region that separates the frontal from the parietal lobes, are the motor and sensory strips. </li></ul><ul><li>The following slides illustrate how much brain surface is devoted to the corresponding body part. </li></ul>
  6. 22. Homuncolus <ul><li>The humuncolus or “little man” on the next slide is a representation of the amount of brain surface dedicated to the various parts of our bodies. </li></ul><ul><li>Note how much brain surface is needed, for example, to “drive” our hands and fingers. This is one reason why fine motor development is slow, and, for some children, very difficult. </li></ul>
  7. 24. Auditory Processing <ul><li>All academic pursuit requires circuits of interconnecting brain activity, functioning well, for success. </li></ul><ul><li>The following is one example of one small part of brain circuitry needed for successful reading. The following slide represents the auditory pathway. Auditory processing of phonemes start with this circuit. </li></ul><ul><li>Many other such circuits are needed for successful reading. This would be an example of only one. </li></ul>

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