McKinney-Vento Act:   Children and Youth  Experiencing Homelessness   Information on Enrollment  of Homeless Students Rock...
The Scale of Homelessness Source: National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty. (1990).  Out of sight–Out of mind? A re...
These characteristics could be attributed to students with other issues  as well as those students experiencing homelessne...
District Liaison Amanda Makis <ul><li>All local educational agencies must have a district liaison </li></ul><ul><li>The di...
District Liaison Continued… <ul><li>Parents or guardians are informed of  educational opportunities available to their chi...
<ul><li>Any individual who lacks a  fixed ,  regular , and  adequate  nighttime residence , including children and youth w...
How to Notify the District Liaison of a Newly Identified Homeless Student <ul><li>Complete and Send to the District Liaiso...
<ul><ul><li>Proof of residency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guardianship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Birth certificates, scho...
McKinney-Vento Act:  Enrollment <ul><li>•  (Depending on the best interest of the student) </li></ul><ul><li>  School plac...
McKinney-Vento Act: Transportation <ul><li>Requires that the school district ensure transportation is provided, at the req...
Transportation Strategies Continued… <ul><li>Provide passes for public transportation, including passes for caretakers whe...
McKinney-Vento Act:  Student Success Requirements <ul><li>•  Immediate assessment of academic status </li></ul><ul><li>Tit...
<ul><li>School District </li></ul><ul><li>•  Set aside Title I funds.  </li></ul><ul><li>•  Ensure enrollment. </li></ul><...
<ul><li>Teachers  </li></ul><ul><li>•  Make the student feel welcome. </li></ul><ul><li>•  Assign a peer buddy to help the...
•  Reduce school entry stress. •  Promote academic success through encouraging words and actions that recognize the gains ...
<ul><li>•  Encourage supportive relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>•  Establish consistent boundaries. </li></ul><ul><li>•  ...
Education is the key to breaking the cycle of homelessness…and,  all of the previous information also applies to children ...
Congratulations! <ul><li>Thank you for caring about our homeless children and viewing this presentation. </li></ul>
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Homeless Information Presentation

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  • Aside from it being in the best interest of the child, as a school district, we have a legal responsibility to enroll all children residing in our district as homeless students, in addition all children that become homeless while living in our district. Generally speaking, assuming that it is in the best interest of the child, the parent can choose to attend the school of origin in this district, or the school of temporary residence.
  • The descriptions listed here include new items found in the 2001 McKinney-Vento Act reauthorization. Some people may not be familiar with the term doubled-up. Be sure to explain this term when describing shared housing. Doubled-up is the sharing of housing with other families or individuals due to a loss of housing (not due to cultural preference or a desire to save money). Not all persons living in the situations described would be considered homeless. Two major factors to consider when making a determination are the adequacy and permanence of the housing. Notes: The designation children and youth refers to individuals age 21 and younger. Migratory children who are living in the situations described above also may qualify as homeless.
  • The LEA could share what alternatives are available such as: • No proof of residency—an affidavit could be signed stating that one is currently homeless, doubled-up, or staying at other temporary accommodations. • No previous school records—the school can call/fax the previous school and request the records. • No immunization records—the school can enroll the student and provide the parent/guardian with information as to where the public ealth office is located to get the needed immunizations.
  • School of origin—the school the student attended before becoming homeless or where the student was last enrolled. During the chaotic time students are experiencing, having a stable school environment can give students a place to count on with people who know them. Unaccompanied youth—student who, for whatever reason, does not live with a parent/guardian.
  • Attendance is an obvious prerequisite to school success. Ensuring that students can get to school via safe and reliable transportation is critical. The McKinney-Vento Act requires state and local educational agencies to adopt policies and practices to ensure transportation is provided, at the request of the parent or guardian (or in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the liaison) to and from the school of origin if 1) within the same LEA, the LEA shall provide or arrange transportation, and 2) the LEA that remains the school of origin and the LEA in which the student now resides agree on a method to apportion responsibility and costs for providing transportation to the school of origin. If an agreement cannot be reached, the LEAs must share the cost and responsibility equally. The proceedings of the NCHE 2000 Transportation Symposium may provide some creative options for implementation of this requirement.
  • The McKinney-Vento Act requires that: * Homeless students receive services comparable to those available to housed students. * High school or GED completion be promoted. * Liaisons collaborate with social service agencies and school districts serving students. * Parents be fully informed of the enrollment options and educational opportunities available to their children and be involved in decision making regarding enrollment options. Schools/districts provide written explanations of decisions when disputes occur. * Separate schools or programs for students experiencing homelessness be prohibited.
  • Homeless Information Presentation

    1. 1. McKinney-Vento Act: Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Information on Enrollment of Homeless Students Rocklin Unified School District Homeless Liaison – Amanda Makis 916-630-3318 [email_address]
    2. 2. The Scale of Homelessness Source: National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty. (1990). Out of sight–Out of mind? A report on anti-homeless laws, litigations, and alternatives in 50 United States. Washington, DC: Author. <ul><li>Up to two million people will experience homelessness in the United States this year. </li></ul><ul><li>Up to 80,000 public school students will experience homelessness in California this year. </li></ul><ul><li>Each year the Rocklin community has more than 125 students experiencing homelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>Families are the fastest-growing segment of the homeless population. </li></ul>
    3. 3. These characteristics could be attributed to students with other issues as well as those students experiencing homelessness. Possible Signs of Homelessness <ul><li>• Attendance at several schools </li></ul><ul><li>• More than one family at the same address </li></ul><ul><li>• Attention-seeking behavior </li></ul><ul><li>• Hunger and hoarding of food </li></ul><ul><li>• Poor hygiene and grooming </li></ul><ul><li>• Sleeping in class </li></ul><ul><li>Inappropriate dress for the weather </li></ul><ul><li>• Some common statements used by homeless students include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ We've moved a lot.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ We’re staying with relatives/ friends while looking for a place.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ We're going through a bad time now.” </li></ul></ul>We need to identify all homeless students within the district – Please notify your district liaison in regard to all newly identified homeless students
    4. 4. District Liaison Amanda Makis <ul><li>All local educational agencies must have a district liaison </li></ul><ul><li>The district must ensure that: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless children and youth are identified </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless students enroll in, and have full and equal opportunity to succeed in, the schools of the LEA </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless families, children, and youth receive educational services </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. District Liaison Continued… <ul><li>Parents or guardians are informed of educational opportunities available to their children </li></ul><ul><li>Public notice of the educational rights is disseminated </li></ul><ul><li>Enrollment disputes are mediated </li></ul><ul><li>Liaisons are required to assist unaccompanied youth in placement/enrollment decisions </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Any individual who lacks a fixed , regular , and adequate nighttime residence , including children and youth who are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing housing due to loss of housing or economic hardship. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Or, children not living with their parent. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to lack of alternative adequate housing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Living in emergency or transitional housing, respite, or shelters. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Awaiting foster care or in the Children’s Receiving Home. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, or bus or train stations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Children and youth who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, regular sleeping accommodations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Migratory children who qualify as homeless because they are living in the circumstances described above. </li></ul></ul>Who is homeless?
    7. 7. How to Notify the District Liaison of a Newly Identified Homeless Student <ul><li>Complete and Send to the District Liaison: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless Student Referral Form </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless Student Services Checklist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Housing Declaration Form (optional) </li></ul></ul>These forms provide verification of homeless identification and service provision. The forms should be filled out completely prior to submission.
    8. 8. <ul><ul><li>Proof of residency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guardianship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Birth certificates, school records, or other documents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical records, including immunization records </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Required dress code items, including uniforms </li></ul></ul>McKinney-Vento Act: Enrollment <ul><li>Requires public schools to immediately enroll students experiencing homelessness even when lacking: </li></ul>
    9. 9. McKinney-Vento Act: Enrollment <ul><li>• (Depending on the best interest of the student) </li></ul><ul><li> School placement in: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>School of origin, if the parent wishes and it is feasible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ School of origin” is the school the child attended when </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>permanently housed or last enrolled </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>School in area of current (homeless) residency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Educational rights posted in: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All public schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The community </li></ul></ul><ul><li>• Access to school for unaccompanied youth </li></ul>The Act requires Enrollment and Attendance of homeless students immediately upon identification.
    10. 10. McKinney-Vento Act: Transportation <ul><li>Requires that the school district ensure transportation is provided, at the request of the parent or guardian (or in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the liaison) to and from the school of origin </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(At the district’s determination), Transportation may be provided by RUSD, public transportation services, or by the parent with reimbursement from the district </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Upon awareness of transportation needs, the school site should contact RUSD transportation to make arrangements. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Transportation Strategies Continued… <ul><li>Provide passes for public transportation, including passes for caretakers when necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Take advantage of transportation systems used by public assistance agencies </li></ul><ul><li>Reimburse parents, guardians, or unaccompanied youth for gas </li></ul><ul><li>Use approved van or taxi services </li></ul><ul><li>Use local funds for transportation </li></ul>
    12. 12. McKinney-Vento Act: Student Success Requirements <ul><li>• Immediate assessment of academic status </li></ul><ul><li>Title One Comparable services for all homeless students at all schools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless children are by definition automatically eligible for Title I services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Free Lunch </li></ul><ul><li>Free Transportation </li></ul><ul><li>• Liaison collaboration between social service agencies and school districts </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>School District </li></ul><ul><li>• Set aside Title I funds. </li></ul><ul><li>• Ensure enrollment. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools </li></ul><ul><li>• Enroll students in free breakfast and lunch programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Contact transportation and assist with transportation arrangements. </li></ul><ul><li>• Ensure access to appropriate instructional supports/resources. </li></ul><ul><li>• Conduct an educational assessment. </li></ul><ul><li>• Provide homeless awareness training. </li></ul><ul><li>• Alert teachers of a student's living situation (respecting privacy). </li></ul>Addressing Needs of Students Experiencing Homelessness
    14. 14. <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>• Make the student feel welcome. </li></ul><ul><li>• Assign a peer buddy to help the student get acquainted with the school and classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>• Make contact with the parents. </li></ul><ul><li>• Give the child ownership of school space (e.g., cubbie, locker, etc.). </li></ul><ul><li>Assess student in regard to academic needs within the first week of attendance </li></ul><ul><li>Provide intervention to achieve academic proficiency. </li></ul>Addressing Needs of Students Experiencing Homelessness, cont’d.
    15. 15. • Reduce school entry stress. • Promote academic success through encouraging words and actions that recognize the gains made. • Use tutoring and after-school programs to provide academic support. • Increase access to services and activities. Working With Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness
    16. 16. <ul><li>• Encourage supportive relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>• Establish consistent boundaries. </li></ul><ul><li>• Have high expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>• Recognize stressful environments outside of school, and provide accommodations for homework. (For example, the child may not have the means to be able to make a collage or do a science project outside of school.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide needed supplies. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide time and space in the school. </li></ul></ul>Working With Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness, cont’d.
    17. 17. Education is the key to breaking the cycle of homelessness…and, all of the previous information also applies to children in formal and informal foster care placements. Please notify the liaison regarding all foster children in your school.
    18. 18. Congratulations! <ul><li>Thank you for caring about our homeless children and viewing this presentation. </li></ul>

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