Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Behaviour, and communication

4,583 views

Published on

Not only is this a 'how to' change behaviour, but an architecture from social psychology to understand the (sometimes confusing) world of behavioural economics, and behavioural communication

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Penis Enlargement and Enhancement Techniques: What REALLY Works?!? ▲▲▲ https://bit.ly/30G1ZO1
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Controversial method reveals inner psychology of techniques you can use to get your Ex back! See it now! ♣♣♣ http://goo.gl/FXTq7P
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Behaviour, and communication

  1. 1. Behaviour, and communication 4th August 2012 Oliver Payne, founder, The Hunting DynastyAuthor of ‘Inspiring Sustainable Behaviour: 19 ways to ask for change’ oliver@thehuntingdynasty.com | How, do you change behaviour?
  2. 2. What is common to us all? | How do you change behaviour?
  3. 3. | How do you change behaviour?
  4. 4. dark v roads | How do you change behaviour?
  5. 5. | How do you change behaviour?
  6. 6. | How do you change behaviour?
  7. 7. Norms (quasi-stationaryContext equilibria)(situational influences) Construal (subjective influence) | How do you change behaviour?
  8. 8. Norms (quasi-stationaryContext equilibria)(situational influences) Construal (subjective influence) | How do you change behaviour?
  9. 9. Norms (quasi-stationary Context equilibria) (situational influences) Construal (subjective influence)Decision-making isrelative to whatyou can have, notabsolutely aboutwhat you want.Your decision is affected bywhat’s on offer – to the pointwhere the addition or subtractionof things you don’t want stillaffects your decision. | How do you change behaviour?
  10. 10. Norms (quasi-stationary Context equilibria) (situational influences) Construal (subjective influence)Decision-making is Sharedrelative to what understandingyou can have, not about expectationsabsolutely about of behaviour withinwhat you want. a group. We tend to conform to expectations even though weYour decision is affected by like to think of ourselves aswhat’s on offer – to the point making personal andwhere the addition or subtraction principled decisions.of things you don’t want stillaffects your decision. (Social, Injunctive, Descriptive . . . Provincial, Proscr/Pre, etc) | How do you change behaviour?
  11. 11. Norms (quasi-stationary Context equilibria) (situational influences) Construal (subjective influence)Decision-making is Sharedrelative to what understanding Where you thinkyou can have, not about expectationsabout somethingabsolutely about of behaviour withinrelative to yourselfwhat you want. a group. affects what you We tend to conform to think about it expectations even though weYour decision is affected by like to think of ourselves as The closer – or more proximal –what’s on offer – to the point making personal and events are the more we thinkwhere the addition or subtraction principled decisions. about ‘actions’; the further awayof things you don’t want still – or distal – events are the moreaffects your decision. (Social, Injunctive, Descriptive . we think ‘in theory’ .. Provincial, Proscr/Pre, etc) - Here/not here - Me/not me - Now/not now - Clear/Unclear | How do you change behaviour?
  12. 12. Norms (quasi-stationary Context equilibria) (situational influences) Construal (subjective influence)Decision-making isrelative to whatyou can have, notabsolutely aboutwhat you want.Your decision is affected bywhat’s on offer – to the pointwhere the addition or subtractionof things you don’t want stillaffects your decision. | How do you change behaviour?
  13. 13. ContextRolls Royce were having problems selling cars in their regular showrooms. | How do you change behaviour?
  14. 14. Context So they sold them at Yacht fairs,Rolls Royce were having where the items on sale go for problems selling cars in their a few million rather than a few regular showrooms. hundred thousand. | How do you change behaviour?
  15. 15. Context So they sold them at Yacht fairs,Rolls Royce were having where the items on sale go for problems selling cars in their a few million rather than a few regular showrooms. hundred thousand. (Ive saved £8m not buying that yacht… whats £350k for a lovely car?!) | How do you change behaviour?
  16. 16. ContextHuber & Puto beerchoice experiement‘Market boundaries and productchoice’ 1983 | How do you change behaviour?
  17. 17. $1.80 $2.60 Context30% 70% | How do you change behaviour?
  18. 18. $1.80 $2.60$1.60 Context 30% 70% | How do you change behaviour?
  19. 19. $1.80 $2.60$1.60 Context0% 50% 50% | How do you change behaviour?
  20. 20. $1.80 $2.60 Context30% 70% | How do you change behaviour?
  21. 21. $1.80 $2.60 $3.40 Context30% 70% | How do you change behaviour?
  22. 22. $1.80 $2.60 $3.40 Context 10%0% 90% | How do you change behaviour?
  23. 23. $1.80 $2.60 $3.40$1.60 Context Huber & Puto beer choice experiement ‘Market boundaries and product choice’ 19830% 10% 30% 70% Who are we? | How do you change behaviour?
  24. 24. Norms (quasi-stationary Context equilibria) (situational influences) Construal (subjective influence)Decision-making isrelative to whatyou can have, notabsolutely aboutwhat you want.Your decision is affected bywhat’s on offer – to the pointwhere the addition or subtractionof things you don’t want stillaffects your decision. | How do you change behaviour?
  25. 25. Norms (quasi-stationaryContext equilibria)(situational influences) Construal (subjective influence) Shared understanding about expectations of behaviour within a group. We tend to conform to expectations even though we like to think of ourselves as making personal and principled decisions. (Social, Injunctive, Descriptive . . . Provincial, Proscr/Pre, etc) | How do you change behaviour?
  26. 26. NormsIn Australia, tax-payers were informed that normal practice was honesty in tax returns HEADS, YOU DIE: Bad decisions, choice architecture, and how to mitigate predictable irrationality | Jack Fuller | Per Capita research | How do you change behaviour?behaviour? create sustainable
  27. 27. Norms The discrepancy between the average behaviour of people and the perceived behaviour of the average person can be pretty wide. Deductions plunged by 47% (675,000,000 Aus$ extra revenue)HEADS, YOU DIE: Bad decisions, choice architecture, and how to mitigate predictable irrationality | Jack Fuller | Per Capita research | How do you change behaviour?behaviour? create sustainable
  28. 28. NormsYes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion | Goldstein, Martin, Cialdini | 2007 | pp20 | How do you change behaviour?
  29. 29. NormsPeople steal bits of wood from Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park. Many past visitors have Please don’t remove theremoved petrified wood petrified wood from the Park,from the Park, changing [nothing] in order to preserve the natural state the natural state of the Petrified Forest of the Petrified ForestSigns were tested to stop the theft: Some more successful than others… Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion | Goldstein, Martin, Cialdini | 2007 | pp20 | How do you change behaviour?
  30. 30. NormsPeople steal bits of wood from Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park. Many past visitors have Please don’t remove theremoved petrified wood petrified wood from the Park,from the Park, changing [nothing] in order to preserve the natural state the natural state of the Petrified Forest of the Petrified Forest 8% theft Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion | Goldstein, Martin, Cialdini | 2007 | pp20 | How do you change behaviour?
  31. 31. NormsPeople steal bits of wood from Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park. Many past visitors have Please don’t remove theremoved petrified wood petrified wood from the Park,from the Park, changing [nothing] in order to preserve the natural state the natural state of the Petrified Forest of the Petrified Forest 8% theft 3% theft Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion | Goldstein, Martin, Cialdini | 2007 | pp20 | How do you change behaviour?
  32. 32. NormsPeople steal bits of wood from Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park. Many past visitors have Please don’t remove theremoved petrified wood petrified wood from the Park,from the Park, changing [nothing] in order to preserve the natural state the natural state of the Petrified Forest of the Petrified Forest 8% theft 3% theft 1.7% theft Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion | Goldstein, Martin, Cialdini | 2007 | pp20 | How do you change behaviour?
  33. 33. NormsPeople steal bits of wood from Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park. Many past visitors have Please don’t remove theremoved petrified wood petrified wood from the Park,from the Park, changing [nothing] in order to preserve the natural state the natural state of the Petrified Forest of the Petrified Forest 8% theft 3% theft 1.7% theft “…a message that focuses recipients on the injunctive norm will be superior to messages that focus recipients on the descriptive norm.” (Cialdini et al., 2003) Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion | Goldstein, Martin, Cialdini | 2007 | pp20 | How do you change behaviour?
  34. 34. Norms (quasi-stationaryContext equilibria)(situational influences) Construal (subjective influence) Shared understanding about expectations of behaviour within a group. We tend to conform to expectations even though we like to think of ourselves as making personal and principled decisions. (Social, Injunctive, Descriptive . . . Provincial, Proscr/Pre, etc) | How do you change behaviour?
  35. 35. Norms (quasi-stationaryContext equilibria)(situational influences) Construal (subjective influence) Where you think about something relative to yourself affects what you think about it The closer – or more proximal – events are the more we think about ‘actions’; the further away – or distal – events are the more we think ‘in theory’ - Here/not here - Me/not me - Now/not now - Clear/Unclear | How do you change behaviour?
  36. 36. US hybrid sales 2000 –’ 06 Temporal discounting(3,000 to 250,000) 1 1 Sales tax incentive: $1k $1,000 $2,000 Kick-back Kick-back | How do you change behaviour?
  37. 37. US hybrid sales 2000 –’ 06 Temporal(3,000 to 250,000) discounting 1 1 Sales tax incentive: $1k $1,000 $2,000 Sales tax discount Income tax rebate | How do you change behaviour?
  38. 38. US hybrid sales 2000 –’ 06 Temporal(3,000 to 250,000) discounting 1 1 Sales tax incentive: $1k $1,000 $2,000 Sales tax discount Income tax rebate Now Not now | How do you change behaviour?
  39. 39. US hybrid sales 2000 –’ 06 Temporal discounting(3,000 to 250,000) 7 6 5 3 4 1 2 1 $1,000 $2,000 Sales tax discount Income tax rebate Now Not now The tendency for people to have excessively stronger preferences for immediate gains relative to future gains. | How do you change behaviour?
  40. 40. Norms (quasi-stationary Context equilibria) (situational influences) Construal (subjective influence)Decision-making is Sharedrelative to what understanding Where you thinkyou can have, not about expectationsabout somethingabsolutely about of behaviour withinrelative to yourselfwhat you want. a group. affects what you We tend to conform to think about it expectations even though weYour decision is affected by like to think of ourselves as The closer – or more proximal –what’s on offer – to the point making personal and events are the more we thinkwhere the addition or subtraction principled decisions. about ‘actions’; the further awayof things you don’t want still – or distal – events are the moreaffects your decision. (Social, Injunctive, Descriptive . we think ‘in theory’ .. Provincial, Proscr/Pre, etc) - Here/not here - Me/not me - Now/not now - Clear/Unclear | How do you change behaviour?
  41. 41. “Just as no building lacks an architecture, so no choice lacks a context.” Dr. Robert Cialdini, ex-Regents Professor of Psychology and Marketing Arizona State University | How do you change behaviour?
  42. 42. Thank you | How do you change behaviour?

×