Leading Learning Through Teacher-Based Teams -handout

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June 29, 10:45am – noon, Room: Fairfield
This session will focus on the importance of leading Teacher-Based Teams (TBTs). Presenters will discuss new 2012 research on the critical roles and responsibilities that everyone (teachers, principals, coaches, central office and superintendents) must engage in if TBTs are to be successful, including the need for “learning leaders” and the necessary changes in the way that central offices supports this kind of learning leadership.
Main Presenter: Brian McNulty, The Leadership and Learning Center

Published in: Education, Business
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Leading Learning Through Teacher-Based Teams -handout

  1. 1. Leading Learning through Teacher-Based Teams 2012 Research Guidance OLAC Summit 2012 June 29, 2012 Brian McNulty, Ph.D.  
  2. 2. Brian McNulty, Ph.D. Dr. Brian McNulty is Vice President, Leadership Development for The Leadership and Learning Center. Brian brings 30 years of experience as a nationally recognized educator in leadership development to his current position at the Leadership and Learning Center. Prior to this he served as the Vice President for Field Services at the Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL). Before coming to McREL, he was an Assistant Superintendent for Adams County School District 14, and the Assistant Commissioner of Education, for the Colorado Department of Education.Brians work and writing have been featured in books, scholarly journals and periodicalsthroughout the world. An author of more than 40 publications, Brians most recent books include,Leaders Make It Happen with Laura Besser (an AASA member book) and School Leadershipthat Works: from Research to Results, an ASCD best selling publication co-authored withRobert Marzano and Tim Waters.Although Dr. McNulty is well known as a both a researcher and a keynote speaker, his primarywork has focused on long-term intensive partnerships with schools, districts, state educationagencies and educational service agencies in applying the current research to field basedproblems. His recent research has focused on developing continuous improvement frameworksbased on data and inquiry.Brian can be reached at: BMcNulty@LeadandLearn.com. The Leadership and Learning Center 317 Inverness Way South, Suite 150 Englewood, Colorado 80112 Toll Free: 1.866.399.6019 International: +1.303.504.9312 Fax: 303.504.9417 LeadandLearn.com
  3. 3. Leading Learning through Teacher-Based Teams 2012 Research Guidance Outcomes • Explore the challenges, issues, and practices associated with continuous improvement in schools and districts • Make recommendations for specific actions How many of you are satisfied with the results you are getting right now? Discuss with your shoulder partner.© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 1All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  4. 4. How do we get better outcomes? Through better: 1. 1 Teaching and Learning 2. Leadership and Learning 3. Collaborative Learning at all levels 1. Where does more powerful teaching come from? a. Learning and using more p powerful teaching g practices b. Teacher-Based Teams a. What does highly effective instruction, or “best practices” look like?© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 2All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  5. 5. Rosenshine (2012) American Educator AFT1. Begin the lesson with a short review of previous learning.2. Present new material in small steps with student practice after each step ith st dent step.3. Ask a large number of questions and check the responses of all students.4. Provide models.5. Guide student practice. Rosenshine (2012)6. Check for student understanding.7. Obtain a high success rate.8 Provide scaffolds for difficult tasks.8. tasks9. Require and monitor independent practice.10. Engage students in weekly and monthly review. We have known quite a bit about instruction for quite a while• However, we continue to support the idea that all instructional practices are equal ti l• They are not!!!© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 3All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  6. 6. Visible Learning & Visible Learning for Teachers John Hattie Ph.D. (2009, 2012)What is the typical effect across 900+ meta-analyses 50,000+ studies 240+ million students 95% of all the effect sizes in education are positive. The most significant finding from the evidence is that almost any intervention can claim that “it works in terms it works” of making some difference in student learning.© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 4All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  7. 7. Distribution of Effects 25,000.00 Numb of Effects 20,000.00 ber 15,000.00 15 000 00 10,000.00 5,000.00 0.00 Hattie (2009, 2012) So we all profess to using “ “research-based practices ” hb d ti Example of Negative Effect • What is one educational practice that has been studied extensively and consistently y y found to have a negative effect on student performance that we continue to use every year in our schools and districts?© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 5All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  8. 8. Influences on Achievement 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.20 0.60 0.10 0.70 0 Zone of 0.80 desired effects 0.90 1.00 Hattie (2009, 2012) Rank Order the Following Area Rank Order1. Teacher subject matter knowledge2. Teacher / student relationship3. Professional development4. Class size There are many practices that have a significant effect on g student performance.© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 6All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  9. 9. Contributions from the Teacher Area Effect Size1. Goal setting 1. d = 0.562. Mastery learning 2. d = 0.583. Questioning 3. d = 0.434. Reciprocal teaching 4. d = 0.745. Direct instruction 5. d = 0.59 Hattie (2009, 2012) Contributions from the Teacher Area Effect Size1. Spaced practice 1. d = 0.712. Peer tutoring 2. d = 0.553. Study skills (outlines, 3. d = 0.59 notes, reviewing, mnemonics)4. Self-verbalizing and 4. d = 0.64 questioning . Hattie (2009, 2012) Which of the following matters most?• Ability grouping• Teaching to learning style• Whole language• Co-teaching or team teaching© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 7All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  10. 10. The biggest effect on student learning occurs when teachers become learners of their own teaching, and when teaching students become their own teachers. Hattie (2009) What works best for students is similar to what works best for teachers:• Attention to setting challenging learning intentions• Clarity about what success means• Attention to learning strategies for developing conceptual understanding Hattie (2009) If students are not doing enough thinking, something is seriously wrong with the instruction. Hattie, 2009© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 8All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  11. 11. A Caution: The Question of Specificity Providing feedback to teachers regarding effective instruction necessitates articulating a broad array of strategies organized into a comprehensive framework. Marzano, , R. J., (2009) 2. Teacher-Based Teams© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 9All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  12. 12. What Do We Know About Teacher-Based Teams– TBTs?Largest Leadership Study to Date • Nine states • 43 school districts • 180 schools • Data from a total of 8,391 teachers and 471 school administrators Findings© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 10All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  13. 13. Findings• Collective leadership has a stronger influence on student learning than any individual source of leadership• Higher-performing schools award greater influence to teacher teams Leithwood and Seashore-Louis, 2012 Teacher Teams had Positive Effects On: • Teacher knowledge and skills • Teacher motivation • Teacher work setting All of which had positive effects on student achievement. Leithwood and Seashore-Louis, 2012 When professional community focuses on the quality of student learning, teachers adopt instructional practices to enhance student learning. Leithwood and Seashore Louis (2012)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 11All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  14. 14. Higher performing schools award greater influence than lower performing schools to l f i h l t teacher teams. Leithwood and Seashore Louis (2012) A growing body of evidence suggests that when teachers collaborate to pose and answer q questions informed by data from y their own students, their knowledge grows and their practice changes. David (2008, 2009) In a comprehensive five-year study of over 1,500 schools, they found that when teachers formed professional learning communities, achievement increased in math, reading, science, and history and absentee and dropout rates decreased. Darling-Hammond, L., et al. 2009© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 12All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  15. 15. With teachers operating in grade-level teams that meet regularly, the school creates structures for examining student progress, as well as for creating a more coherent curriculum and allowing teachers to learn from one another. Darling-Hammond, L., 2010 Collaborative inquiry is among the most promising strategies forstrengthening teaching and learning. The biggest risk, however, is not providing the necessary leadership and support. David, J. L. (2008, 2009)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 13All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  16. 16. “Time for collaboration by itself, even when administratively supported, was unlikely to improve achievement unless additional conditions were in place to structure its effectiveness.” Saunders, W. M., et al. (2010) Provided the right conditions, leadership, and protocols, teachers will make use of collaborative time in ways that improve achievement. Saunders, W. M., et al. (2010)Protocols that articulate specific inquiry functions are critical:• Jointly and recursively identifying appropriate and worthwhile goals for student learning• Finding or developing appropriate means to assess student progress towards the goals• Bringing to the table the expertise of g g p colleagues• Planning, preparing, and delivering lessons• Using evidence from the classroom to evaluate instruction• Reflecting on the process to determine next steps Gallimore et al. (2009)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 14All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  17. 17. “With a balance of administrative support and pressure, teacher groups are more likely to persist in addressing problems long enough to make a causal g connection between instructional decisions and achievement gains.” Gallimore et. al. (2009) Positive outcomes are unlikely in the absence of building leadership that supports and holds teacher teams accountable for sustaining the inquiry process g q yp until they see tangible results. Gallimore et. al. (2009) Critical Components for Effective TBTs Structures are Essential: – Regular times – Active facilitation – Protocols – Leadership© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 15All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  18. 18. Professional community appears to foster collective learning of new practices provided there is principal leadership. Leithwood and Seashore Louis (2012) 2. 2 Leadership and Learning Principal Leadership© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 16All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  19. 19. When principals serve effectively as instructional leaders, student achievement l d t d t hi t increases. Leithwood and Seashore-Louis (2012) Instructional Leadership includes Two Complementary Approaches that are Both Necessary:1. A focus on classroom practice2.2 Shared leadership (through teacher teams – TBTs and BLT) to create a learning organization Leithwood and Seashore-Louis (2012) Both of these factors were significant in terms of the schools overall achievement. Leithwood and Seashore-Louis (2012)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 17All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  20. 20. A highly significant factor of whether or not professional community exists in the school is strong leadership by the principal. Leithwood and Seashore Louis (2012)Leadership Dimension Average Effect Size4. Promoting and participating in 0.84 teacher learning and development Robinson et al. (2011) The average impact of this leadership practice is 2X the effect of any other other leadership practice!© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 18All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  21. 21. Direct participation in the learning enables principals to more fully understand the challenges, opportunities, and conditions teachers need to be successful. Robinson (2007, 2008, 2011) 3. Collaborative Inquiry and Learning (capacity building) at all levels “By using an inquiry-based team framework, achievement scores rose from the worst to the best in the district.” Gallimore et. al. (2009)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 19All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  22. 22. One thing you should remember Is the concept of collective capacity Fullan, (2010) And the one that ultimately counts is collective, collective collaborative capacity. Fullan, (2010). Only collective action will be strong enough to change the system. s stem Fullan (2010)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 20All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  23. 23. Collaborative Inquiry and Learning• Develop teams at each level of the system (Classroom, Building, and District levels)• Share responsibility and accountability for progress (in actions and outcomes)• Develop capacity by providing differentiated professional development Inquiry and Learning The BIG questions: • Are you making progress and why? • If you are not making progress, why? The centerpiece of action should be based on instruction. learning and instruction Fullan (2011)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 21All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  24. 24. Strong shared and instructional leadership, strong professional community, and strong y, g instruction moderate the effects of concentrated poverty. Leithwood and Seashore Louis (2012) All of the successful school systems have come to trust and respect teachers teachers. Fullan (2010) Improving practice can only be done by teachers, not to teachers. Wurtzel (2007)© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 22All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  25. 25. Leadership is a Balance of Support Pressure Questions and Discussion Brian McNulty, Ph.D. The Leadership and Learning Center 303.504.9312, Ext. 211 BMcNulty@leadandlearn.com leadandlearn.com© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 23All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  26. 26. References   Darling-Hammond, L., and Richardson, N., (2009b). Teacher learning: What matters. Educational Leadership. 66 (5) 46-53. ASCD. Arlington VA. Darling-Hammond, L., (2010). The flat world and education: how Americas commitment to equity will determine our future. Teacher College Press. NY,NY David, J. L. (2008/2009). What the research says about…Collaborative inquiry. Educational Leadership, 66 (4) 87-88. ASCD. Alexandria, VA. Fullan, M., (2010). All systems go: the change imperative for whole system reform. Corwin. Thousand Oaks California Gallimore, R. R., Ermeling, B.A, Saunders, W.M & Goldenberg, C. (2009) "Moving the Learning of Teaching Closer to Practice: Teacher Education Implications of School-Based Inquiry Teams." The Elementary School Journal.Volume 109, Number 5. The University of Chicago. Pp.537-553. Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York: Routledge. Hattie, J. (2012). Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning. New York: Routledge. Leithwood, K. & Seashore Louis, K., (2012) Linking Leadership to Student Learning. Jossey-Bass. San Francisco CA, Marzano, R. J., (2009). Setting the record straight on “high yield” strategies. Phi Delta Kappan. 91 (1), 30-37. Robinson, V., M., J.(2007). School leadership and student outcomes: identifying what works and why. Australian Council of Educational Leadership (ACEL), Winmallee Australia. #41 Robinson, V. M.J., Lloyd, C. A., &. Rowe, K.J., (2008).The Impact of Leadership on Student Outcomes: An Analysis of the Differential Effects of Leadership Types. Educational Administration Quarterly; 44;(5)pp 635-674. Robinson, V., (2011) Student-centered leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Rosenshine, B., (2012)Principles of Instruction: Researched-based strategies that all teachers should know. American Educator. Vol. 36. No.1 Spring. Pp. 12- 39© 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 24All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  27. 27. Saunders, W.M., Goldenberg, C.N., & Gallimore, P. (2009). Increasing achievement by focusing on grade-level teams: A prospective, quasi- experimental study of title I schools. American Educational Research Journal. 44 (4). Pp 10006- 1033. Wurtzel, J. (2007). The professional, personified. Journal of Staff Development, 28 (4).  © 2012 The Leadership and Learning Center Page 25All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. Leadership Keynotewww.leadandlearn.com Columbus, Ohio • June 29, 2012
  28. 28. FEEDBACK FOR FACILITATORSEMINAR TITLE:LOCATION & DATE:FACILITATOR: Your feedback is very important. It fosters continuous improvement for me and for this work. Feel free to make additional comments on the back of this page.What was the most helpful thing you learned as a result of this session?What would have helped you learn more effectively/efficiently?What questions do you still have about the discussion?What else would you like the presenter to know about this session?Please visit our web site at www.LeadAndlearn.com for more information about The Leadership and Learning Center Center seminars, institutes, and conferences Scheduling staff development for my school district, conference, or convention Catalog of books and videos Performance assessments linked to my state’s standardsSCHOOL DISTRICT:NAME:CIRCLE PROPER TITLE: MR. MS. MRS. DR.TELEPHONE: E-MAIL :SCHOOL WEB SITE:SCHOOL NAME/ ORGANIZATION:JOB TITLE:BUSINESS ADDRESS:CITY, STATE, ZIP:FAX #: The Leadership and Learning Center
  29. 29. Facilitator Feedback. p. 2 of 2Burning Questions, Challenges, and Success Stories______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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